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9 people detained for violating public order at scandalous exhibition at Vinzavod

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  • Bill Samsonoff
    http://www.interfax-religion.com/?act=news&div=9885 21 September 2012, 10:22 Nine people detained for violating public order at scandalous exhibition at
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 23, 2012
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      http://www.interfax-religion.com/?act=news&div=9885

      21 September 2012, 10:22
      Nine people detained for violating public order at scandalous exhibition
      at Vinzavod

      Moscow, September 21, Interfax - Nine people have been detained for
      public order violations at the Vinzavod gallery of contemporary art in
      the Fourth Syromyatnichesky Passage, a Moscow police spokesperson told
      Interfax.

      "Nine people have been detained near 1, 4th Syromyatnichesky Passage,
      building 9, for public order violations," the spokesperson said.

      The detainees will be taken to a police station for a "prophylactic talk".

      The incident occurred ahead of the opening at Vinzavod's Gelman Gallery
      center of the Spiritual Abuse exhibition inspired by the Pussy Riot case.

      A group of 20 Don Cossacks gathered near the entrance to Gelman Gallery
      on Thursday afternoon but found the door locked from the inside. They
      were later joined by Vinzavod employees, reporters and the first
      visitors, an Interfax correspondent reported from the scene.

      The exhibition consists of four "icons" painted on wooden panels, 160 cm
      by 200 cm, by artist Yevgenia Maltseva and depicting the Pussy Riot punk
      band in color balaclavas in a conventional impressionistic style.

      One of the "icons" has the word "Free" painted on it in large yellow
      letters.

      The Cossacks, chanting "No to Liberal Fascism" and other slogans,
      attempted to force their way into the gallery. There is a heavy police
      presence and several police buses have been brought in.

      Several Orthodox activists and Cossacks were detained and led into the
      buses.

      Later, a group of young people appeared, one of them with a guitar, and
      staged an improvised concert. One of the "performers" was Dmitry Enteo,
      an Orthodox activist, who tore a "Free Pussy Riot" T-shirt off a man at
      the Paveletsky Railway Station and who was among those who later burst
      into the Theater.doc center where a performance about Pussy Riot was
      under way.

      The Cossacks vowed to enter the gallery and said that some 200 more
      Cossacks were coming.

      "We came to see with our own eyes whether this exhibition insults the
      feelings of believers," Oleg Kassin, co-chairman of the People's
      Assembly movement, told Interfax.

      "I intend to record violations that occur at this exhibition. I saw
      photographs of these paintings, they are call icons, on the Internet.
      They incite interethnic enmity, which is particularly inadmissible on
      the eve of the Nativity of the Holy Mother of God," he said.

      Earlier, the Eurasian Youth Union threatened to disrupt the exhibition
      and "destroy the blasphemous works".

      The Moscow Patriarchate described the exhibition as a cynical act of
      terror against Russian culture.

      "What is happening at this exhibition has nothing to do with art. This
      is yet another act of cynical and merciless terrorism against our
      culture," secretary of the Patriarchal Council for Culture Archimandrite
      Tikhon (Shevkunov) told Interfax-Religion.
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