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Greek Orthodox Community Divided Over Metropolitan Isaiah’s Decision

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  • Bill Samsonoff
    http://usa.greekreporter.com/2011/10/29/greek-orthodox-community-divided-over-metropolitan-isaiahs-decision/ Greek Orthodox Community Divided Over Metropolitan
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 1, 2011
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      http://usa.greekreporter.com/2011/10/29/greek-orthodox-community-divided-over-metropolitan-isaiahs-decision/

      Greek Orthodox Community Divided Over Metropolitan Isaiah’s Decision

      Posted on 29 October 2011 by Stella Tsolakidou

      After the October 24 meeting of Greek Orthodox parishioners regarding
      their Church leader’s decision to split the Salt Lake City community
      into two parishes, the outraged parishioners decided to sue Metropolitan
      Isaiah of Denver — the Greek Orthodox leader for a 12-state region
      including Utah — for his decision to disregard both the parishioners
      will and the directive of the Synod.

      Back in 2007, a survey amongst parishioners has shown that 87% were
      against the split of the Greek Orthodox Community into two parishes, the
      Holy Trinity Cathedral located in Salt Lake City downtown and the
      Prophet Elias Church in Holladay.

      In the October 24 meeting, 90 community members discussed ways of
      keeping the 105-year-old community intact, which included possible suing
      and judicial action on behalf of them.

      Holy Trinity Cathedral was the original parish church and then in the
      1960’s the community added a second church, the one of Prophet Elias.
      Today, the combined parish has more than 1,200 families.

      Metropolitan Isaiah claimed that the two churches have been “de facto”
      separate parishes for several years, and he has become convinced that
      most parishioners want them to formally separate.

      “The anger and the animosity between these parishes, involving an
      increasing number of members, have verified the fact that this situation
      could last for many more years,” Metropolitan Isaiah wrote, “and this
      would be a continuing detriment to the teachings and traditions of our
      holy Orthodox faith.”

      Parishioner John Saltas finds no particular reason to undo what the
      community has built over more than a century. “Our community has been
      neighbors, work partners and communes at the holy altar for over 100
      years,” he said. “The majority of us do not want this to happen, and
      that’s by a wide, wide, wide majority.”

      Now, the concerned parishioners are planning to continue with the legal
      actions against The Metropolitan and the Proistameno of Prophet Elias
      Church, since their only wish is to get things back the way they were
      before the arrival of the Proistameno.
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