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Seminarian expelled before sex abuse charges

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  • msopts@aol.com
    Anchorage Daily News Seminarian expelled before sex abuse charges (Published: July 26, 2004)
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 31, 2004
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      Anchorage Daily News
      Seminarian expelled before sex abuse charges

      (Published: July 26, 2004)

      KODIAK (AP) - A 22-year-old man was expelled from a Russian Orthodox seminary months before being charged with 11 counts of sexual abuse of a minor, a diocese attorney said.

      Jim Gorsky, attorney for the Russian Orthodox Diocese of Alaska, said Terenty Dushkin was removed in December from St. Herman's Theological Seminary in Kodiak for an unrelated matter.

      Alaska diocese Bishop Nikolai said in a statement that Dushkin was expelled because he did not follow certain rules required of all students. He did not specify the rules that were broken.

      "Until he was charged, the Seminary and Diocese had no knowledge of his alleged inappropriate conduct," the bishop said in his statement.

      Dushkin, the stepson of Unalaska Rep. Carl Moses, was charged earlier this month in Unalaska. The allegations against him include exploitation of a minor and child pornography.

      Police said officers seized a tape from Dushkin that shows sex scenes with a 17-year-old girl. The charges also include sex with a 15-year-old.

      He is also charged in Unalaska District Court for allegedly having sexual contact with a 13-year-old girl and 14-year-old girl last summer. Some of the charges go back to 2002.

      Dushkin, the stepson of Unalaska Representative Carl Moses, had not been readmitted to the seminary, contrary to previous news reports, according to the diocese.

      "Mr. Dushkin has applied for re-entry to the seminary, but the application has not yet been acted upon by the admission committee," the statement said.

      St. Herman's, located in Kodiak since 1977, is Alaska's only training school for Russian Orthodox priests. Kodiak's ties to Russian Orthodox missionaries go back more than 200 years, when the island's Three Saints Bay became home to Alaska's first Russian settlement in 1784.

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