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Romanian Patriarch Enunciated 5 Principles Of Orthodox Social Philanthropy

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  • Bill Samsonoff
    http://www.basilica.ro/en/news/the_patriarch_of_the_romanian_orthodox_church_enunciated_five_principles_of_christian_orthodox_social_philanthropy_5209.html The
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 5, 2010
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      http://www.basilica.ro/en/news/the_patriarch_of_the_romanian_orthodox_church_enunciated_five_principles_of_christian_orthodox_social_philanthropy_5209.html

      The Patriarch Of The Romanian Orthodox Church
      Enunciated Five Principles Of Christian Orthodox Social Philanthropy

      His Beatitude Patriarch Daniel enunciated five
      principles of Christian Orthodox social
      philanthropy during the Pastoral – Missionary
      Conference with the theme “Social – Philanthropic
      Mission of the Church, Spiritual Vocation and
      Practical Necessity” held on, 3 November 2010, in
      the “Patriarch Teoctist” Aula Magna of the Patriarchal Palace, as follows:

      1. The philanthropic work of the Church is the
      continuation of the philanthropic healing
      deifying and saving work of Jesus Christ, our
      Lord, Son of God, Who was made man due to the
      love of humans and for their salvation, so that
      man should participate in the eternal life and love of the Holy Trinity.

      2. Social philanthropy should not be separated
      from the ecclesiastic Liturgy, because prayer is
      a source of humble sacrificial love. The divine
      philanthropy or divine love for humans is
      celebrated in the Divine Liturgy, while the
      social Philanthropy of the Church is a concrete
      witness of this divine love present in the life
      and work of the Church, of the mysterious Body of Christ.

      3. The social philanthropy of the Church is first
      of all a pastoral philanthropy, namely it should
      take into account the guidance of man on the way
      to salvation. The love of the Church for man
      should be, first of all, the care shown for
      feeding him with the spiritual food of the Holy
      Gospel, his healing with the grace of the Holy
      Sacraments and man’s growth by cultivating
      virtues and good deeds. Together with this
      pastoral or social philanthropy the material
      philanthropy is also developed regarding the
      body’s food and clothes, medical healing, and
      everything necessary for the biological life.
      This attitude of the Church is inspired by the
      work of Jesus Christ, our Lord, Who spiritually
      feeds the crowds with the annunciation of the
      Gospel of salvation, heals the sick and
      multiplies the loaves of bread. Obeying Christ,
      the Church gives priority to prayer or social
      life as a source of light and of holy love for
      her social work. This fact accounts for the
      presence of the charity priests in hospitals,
      military units, prisons, etc. Yet, if social
      philanthropy is separated from spirituality, it
      becomes secularised, and the man who is suffering
      is no longer looked upon as the mysterious image
      of Christ, but as a simple social person.

      4. The Orthodox social-philanthropic work has the
      parochial and monastic life as source of
      inspiration, because the purpose of the social
      philanthropy is, first of all, to promote the
      brotherly communion in the Church and society,
      not only to meet some immediate material needs.
      So, both the solidarity with those in need and
      the gratitude for the well doers must be
      cultivated, in order to strengthen the communion among people.

      5. The co-operation of the Church with various
      humanitarian associations, foundations and
      organisations is beneficial if it looks upon good
      health as a present of God and the life of man on
      the earth as time of preparation for the heavenly
      eternal life. In this sense, the love for one’s
      neighbour is the main criterion of man’s
      salvation, while the final judgement concerns
      especially the good that we could have done to our neighbour, but we have not.
      So, no matter how big our social philanthropy may
      be, we must humbly admit that we have not done everything necessary.
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