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[hocna] [Fwd: Article from the globeandmail.com Web Centre]

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  • Fr. Panagiotes Carras
    This e-mail has been sent to you by Peter Pelegris(peter.pelegris@nbpcd.com) from the globeandmail.com Web Centre. Message: And the Anglican church wonders
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 1, 1999
    • Fr Michael Azkoul
      Dear Fr & Orthodox friends, Such are the consequences of innovation. The Fathers warned us that altering the Faith often begins with small changes, little
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 2, 1999
        Dear Fr & Orthodox friends,
        Such are the consequences of innovation. The Fathers warned us that altering the Faith often begins with small changes, little stone are picked from the wall, so to speak, until finally the entire structure is undermined and collapses.
        Innovations sometimes begin not with "theory" but with "practice"; e.g., Anglicans, so anxious to prove the apostolicity of their priesthood, began to welcome non-Anglicans to worship and the Sacraments. Such a practice requires theological justification, which their theologians provided by ingenious reasonings. As St Irenaeus says, doctrine is a theological network, error in one area has ramifications in all others. Little by little the whole structure of Anglican belief begins to unravel. Hence, modern Anglicanism which, in trying to become all things to all men, lost all theological identity. One ceases to wonder in what sense it may be called "Christian."
        Orthodox must guard against the "theological imagination," lest many be led astray and the flock of Christ be scattered.
        Fr Michael Azkoul
        Fr. Panagiotes Carras wrote:

        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > -- Easily schedule meetings and events using the group calendar!
        > -- http://www.egroups.com/cal?listname=hocna&m=1
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        > Subject: Article from the globeandmail.com Web Centre
        > Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 10:17 -0500
        > From: Peter Pelegris <peter.pelegris@...>
        > To: pcarras@...
        >
        > This e-mail has been sent to you by Peter Pelegris(peter.pelegris@...) from the
        > globeandmail.com Web Centre.
        >
        > Message: And the Anglican church wonders where their congregation has gone. Maybe they have gone to Buddha - since there is no difference. (The writer is an Anglican bishop)
        >
        > The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, December 1, 1999
        >
        > And the walls come tumbling down
        > As leaders of the world's religions meet today, a bishop forecasts big changes ahead
        > By Michael Ingham
        >
        > More than 10,000 people are expected to gather in Cape Town today for the Parliament of the World's Religions. The meeting marks the end of a century of increasing global interfaith co-operation and the promise of a new relationship among the world's religions.
        >
        > This is not a universal view. Salman Rushdie, for one, recently offered some stringent opinions on religion in these columns ("Imagine there's no heaven," Oct. 25) with which I found myself surprisingly in sympathy. It is true, for example, that religious passions can become dangerously intolerant. But this is only one side of the picture. The fact is the world is changing. And so too, slowly, are the world's religions.
        >
        > As we come to the close of this millennium, which has seen more than its share of religious wars, it's fascinating to recall how far religion has come, and to think how it might change in the future. Clairvoyance is perilous, of course, but a few things already seem obvious.
        >
        > One is that the kind of religion we have known for the past 1,000 years will not survive. For millions in the Western world traditional faith is already a nostalgia, and the same thing will happen in the developing world as it, too, undergoes intellectual and technological modernization. The strong hope of some in the West that the Third World will keep alive the flame of religious tradition will inevitably turn out to be a spiritual quicksand.
        >
        > The religion of the past millennium has been based on the isolation of religious belief systems from each other and the institutionalization of power among hierarchies and elites. At Y1K there were no world religions, only local religions serving local cultures. The emergence of global faiths -- a relatively recent phenomenon -- was also accompanied by their internal fragmentation. In Christianity we call them denominations, and they have defined our self-understanding since 1054, when the separation of Roman and Eastern churches became permanent. The preservation of denominations has been the role of religious leaders, buttressed by various power structures. But time and social changes are sweeping them all away.
        >
        > The future, at least for Christianity, will be postdenominational. We can see it already. Young people now go wherever their spiritual needs are met, not to the place their parents went. Scholars and theologians are finally resolving centuries-old dogmatic differences, but faithful and dedicated people have long ago decided such differences were meaningless. People frequently find greater companionship with others across the old denominational lines than within them.
        >
        > So too with religions themselves. The big emerging movement of the future -- still young but now unstoppable -- will be global interfaith consciousness. Human nature has not ceased to be spiritual, but human beings have become tired of the relentless and destructive competitiveness of religions, each claiming to be the only way. People by the millions are now crossing religious boundaries, historically patrolled by powerful institutional authorities, and meeting each other as human beings and as fellow seekers after truth. Just as ecumenism has wrought profound changes among the churches, interfaith movements will bring the religions into new self-critical reformulation.
        >
        > Bishop Bill Swing of San Francisco, founder of the United Religions Initiative (inspired by the original vision of the United Nations), says the big question of the next millennium for believers will be "how generous can you stand God to be?" In the past 1,000 years we have fought hard for the belief that God is on our side, a member of our tribe, a sponsor of our interests (whichever "our" side happens to be). The next question is, can we see God -- by whatever name -- in our neighbour's tribe and in our neighbour's interests? Can we believe the God we know to be equally generous in self-disclosure to others as well as to us?
        >
        > I can imagine a world where people of faith finally turn their backs on the old competitive ways and live together in mutual courtesy and respect. I can imagine a time when the founders and saints of all the traditions -- Moses, Jesus, Mohammed, Buddha, Guru Nanak and so on -- are honoured and cherished in all of them. I foresee the day when powerful religious elites will have to become servants again of self-determining religious communities, and the intellectual Berlin Walls, erected by the guardians of various dogmatic orthodoxies, will come tumbling down at the hands of ordinary believers.
        >
        > It won't happen in my lifetime, or yours, nor will it happen without pain. But the signs are all around us and, whatever we think about them, the tides of history will roll on regardless. Many Christians today find this frightening. Yet if we really believe in the sovereignty of God in creation, and the power of the Holy Spirit in human affairs, we will go forward unafraid. If God has brought us thus far through this turbulent millennium, will God not keep faith with us a while longer?
        >
        > Michael Ingham is the Anglican bishop of New Westminster B.C. His most recent book is Mansions of the Spirit: Religion in a Multi-Faith World.
        >
        > Copyright 1999 The Globe and Mail
        >
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        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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      • Fr. Mike Barclay
        Rev. Fathers and members of the List, Glory to Jesus Christ! Fr. Michael Azkoul is totally correct. Our contacts with those of other faiths must be kept free
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 10, 1999
          Rev. Fathers and members of the List,

          Glory to Jesus Christ!

          Fr. Michael Azkoul is totally correct. Our contacts with those of other
          faiths must be kept free of the kind of the wishy-washiness that so often
          characterizes those contact. We are called to love--not to sacrifice to the
          Buddha or Shiva. Our faith should never be compromised by the sort of
          new-ageish pop-psychology that says "I'm okay--you're okay we just worship
          different aspects of the same deity." Well, that just isn't the case.
          There is only one God and we must always witness to the beauty of God's Holy
          Name and what He has done for us.

          Blessing and love in Christ,
          Fr. Mike Barclay
          St. Maximos the Confessor Orthodox Mission
          414 Oak St.
          Indiana, PA 15701
          724.349.2129
          <http://www.iup.edu/~frmikeb> www.iup.edu/~frmikeb
          frmikeb@...
        • Jeffrey G. Elias Dorrance, CPC
          Dear Friends, Speaking as a former Anglican who ought to know and should have known better from the start,Fr. Azkoul has it exactly right. The same phenomenon
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 11, 1999
            Dear Friends,
            Speaking as a former Anglican who ought to know and should have known better
            from the start,Fr. Azkoul has it exactly right. The same phenomenon is also
            true of the Roman Catholic Church, as many present and former Roman
            Catholics will ruefully admit. Could this also be happening now to the the
            Coptic denomination and to the new calendar "Orthodox"? I suspect so.
            Watching a TV program the other night on Ethiopia, I happened to notice that
            Ethiopian icons are now politically correct. They show that the complexion
            of the Holy Theotokos was more of an ebony hue than the usual complexion we
            see in truly Orthodox icons. The Episcopalian commentator was himself
            pleasantly surprised by this.
            Elias Dorrance



            On Thu, 02 Dec 1999 08:02:07 -0600, hocna@egroups.com wrote:

            > Dear Fr & Orthodox friends,
            > Such are the consequences of innovation. The Fathers warned us that
            altering the Faith often begins with small changes, little stone are picked
            from the wall, so to speak, until finally the entire structure is undermined
            and collapses.
            > Innovations sometimes begin not with "theory" but with "practice";
            e.g., Anglicans, so anxious to prove the apostolicity of their priesthood,
            began to welcome non-Anglicans to worship and the Sacraments. Such a
            practice requires theological justification, which their theologians
            provided by ingenious reasonings. As St Irenaeus says, doctrine is a
            theological network, error in one area has ramifications in all others.
            Little by little the whole structure of Anglican belief begins to unravel.
            Hence, modern Anglicanism which, in trying to become all things to all men,
            lost all theological identity. One ceases to wonder in what sense it may be
            called "Christian."
            > Orthodox must guard against the "theological imagination," lest many
            be led astray and the flock of Christ be scattered.
            > Fr Michael Azkoul
            > Fr. Panagiotes Carras wrote:
            >
            > >
            ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > > -- Easily schedule meetings and events using the group calendar!
            > > -- http://www.egroups.com/cal?listname=hocna&m=1
            > >
            > >
            ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > >
            > > Subject: Article from the globeandmail.com Web Centre
            > > Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 10:17 -0500
            > > From: Peter Pelegris <peter.pelegris@...>
            > > To: pcarras@...
            > >
            > > This e-mail has been sent to you by Peter
            Pelegris(peter.pelegris@...) from the
            > > globeandmail.com Web Centre.
            > >
            > > Message: And the Anglican church wonders where their congregation has
            gone. Maybe they have gone to Buddha - since there is no difference. (The
            writer is an Anglican bishop)
            > >
            > > The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, December 1, 1999
            > >
            > > And the walls come tumbling down
            > > As leaders of the world's religions meet today, a bishop forecasts
            big changes ahead
            > > By Michael Ingham
            > >
            > > More than 10,000 people are expected to gather in Cape Town today for
            the Parliament of the World's Religions. The meeting marks the end of a
            century of increasing global interfaith co-operation and the promise of a
            new relationship among the world's religions.
            > >
            > > This is not a universal view. Salman Rushdie, for one, recently offered
            some stringent opinions on religion in these columns ("Imagine there's no
            heaven," Oct. 25) with which I found myself surprisingly in sympathy. It is
            true, for example, that religious passions can become dangerously
            intolerant. But this is only one side of the picture. The fact is the world
            is changing. And so too, slowly, are the world's religions.
            > >
            > > As we come to the close of this millennium, which has seen more than
            its share of religious wars, it's fascinating to recall how far religion has
            come, and to think how it might change in the future. Clairvoyance is
            perilous, of course, but a few things already seem obvious.
            > >
            > > One is that the kind of religion we have known for the past 1,000 years
            will not survive. For millions in the Western world traditional faith is
            already a nostalgia, and the same thing will happen in the developing world
            as it, too, undergoes intellectual and technological modernization. The
            strong hope of some in the West that the Third World will keep alive the
            flame of religious tradition will inevitably turn out to be a spiritual
            quicksand.
            > >
            > > The religion of the past millennium has been based on the isolation of
            religious belief systems from each other and the institutionalization of
            power among hierarchies and elites. At Y1K there were no world religions,
            only local religions serving local cultures. The emergence of global faiths
            -- a relatively recent phenomenon -- was also accompanied by their internal
            fragmentation. In Christianity we call them denominations, and they have
            defined our self-understanding since 1054, when the separation of Roman and
            Eastern churches became permanent. The preservation of denominations has
            been the role of religious leaders, buttressed by various power structures.
            But time and social changes are sweeping them all away.
            > >
            > > The future, at least for Christianity, will be postdenominational. We
            can see it already. Young people now go wherever their spiritual needs are
            met, not to the place their parents went. Scholars and theologians are
            finally resolving centuries-old dogmatic differences, but faithful and
            dedicated people have long ago decided such differences were meaningless.
            People frequently find greater companionship with others across the old
            denominational lines than within them.
            > >
            > > So too with religions themselves. The big emerging movement of the
            future -- still young but now unstoppable -- will be global interfaith
            consciousness. Human nature has not ceased to be spiritual, but human beings
            have become tired of the relentless and destructive competitiveness of
            religions, each claiming to be the only way. People by the millions are now
            crossing religious boundaries, historically patrolled by powerful
            institutional authorities, and meeting each other as human beings and as
            fellow seekers after truth. Just as ecumenism has wrought profound changes
            among the churches, interfaith movements will bring the religions into new
            self-critical reformulation.
            > >
            > > Bishop Bill Swing of San Francisco, founder of the United Religions
            Initiative (inspired by the original vision of the United Nations), says the
            big question of the next millennium for believers will be "how generous can
            you stand God to be?" In the past 1,000 years we have fought hard for the
            belief that God is on our side, a member of our tribe, a sponsor of our
            interests (whichever "our" side happens to be). The next question is, can we
            see God -- by whatever name -- in our neighbour's tribe and in our
            neighbour's interests? Can we believe the God we know to be equally generous
            in self-disclosure to others as well as to us?
            > >
            > > I can imagine a world where people of faith finally turn their backs on
            the old competitive ways and live together in mutual courtesy and respect. I
            can imagine a time when the founders and saints of all the traditions --
            Moses, Jesus, Mohammed, Buddha, Guru Nanak and so on -- are honoured and
            cherished in all of them. I foresee the day when powerful religious elites
            will have to become servants again of self-determining religious
            communities, and the intellectual Berlin Walls, erected by the guardians of
            various dogmatic orthodoxies, will come tumbling down at the hands of
            ordinary believers.
            > >
            > > It won't happen in my lifetime, or yours, nor will it happen without
            pain. But the signs are all around us and, whatever we think about them, the
            tides of history will roll on regardless. Many Christians today find this
            frightening. Yet if we really believe in the sovereignty of God in creation,
            and the power of the Holy Spirit in human affairs, we will go forward
            unafraid. If God has brought us thus far through this turbulent millennium,
            will God not keep faith with us a while longer?
            > >
            > > Michael Ingham is the Anglican bishop of New Westminster B.C. His
            most recent book is Mansions of the Spirit: Religion in a Multi-Faith World.
            > >
            > > Copyright 1999 The Globe and Mail
            > >
            > > Visit the globeandmail.com Web Centre for your competitive edge.
            > >
            > > - News: http://www.globeandmail.com
            > > - Books: http://www.chaptersglobe.com
            > > - Careers: http://www.globecareers.com
            > > - Mutual Funds: http://www.globefund.com
            > > - Stocks: http://www.globeinvestor.com
            > > - ROB Magazine: http://www.robmagazine.com
            > > - Technology: http://www.globetechnology.com
            > >
            > >
            ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > > -- Easily schedule meetings and events using the group calendar!
            > > -- http://www.egroups.com/cal?listname=hocna&m=1
            >
            >
            >
            >
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