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Gibson's Passion, Suffering, and the Dogma of the Redemption

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  • jerinicm
    Well, my good people, we can conclude from all the reviews of The Passion of the Christ that we ve read here and elsewhere that the film is one more sorry
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 9, 2004
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      Well, my good people, we can conclude from all the reviews of "The
      Passion of the Christ" that we've read here and elsewhere that the
      film is one more sorry example of the "Satisfaction Theory:" Christ
      must suffer to assuage the wrath of the Father against the human race,
      which dared insult the Divine Majesty. This film is one with all the
      Late Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque crucifixes and paintings awash
      with blood and gore--disgusting and perverted. I'll skip the show,
      thank you very much!

      I was intrigued by BahCal's linking of Gibson's "Passion" with
      totalitarian ideology: crush Man, make him grovel! Yes, the Orwellian
      dystopia, Stalinism and other Communist tyrannies, and Nazism know
      this well. Alas, they learned it from Western Christianity and the
      Inquisition. "Under torture you say not only what the inquisitor
      wants, but also what you imagine might please him, because a bond
      (this, truly, diabolical) is established between you and him." --From
      "The Name of the Rose."

      So much for the "lust for pain." Let's not forget that Metropolitan
      Anthony, in his book "The Dogma of the Redemption," declared that our
      Savior's spiritual sufferings far outweighed the physical.
      Specifically, he agonized over our fall and the depths to which we had
      all sunk and prepared to storm Hades to free the righteous from the
      jaws of death. But in order to do so, he consented to be betrayed and
      put to death by his own people. In Gesthemane, he grieved for their
      sin; that was the cup he wanted to pass from him. But, as
      Metropolitan Anthony says, he endured this spiritual passion out of
      co-suffering love for us. This is the true passion--not the perverted
      imaginings of the West.

      In Christ, Margaret Jerinic
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