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Review of the book "Jihad in the West Muslim Conquests...

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  • tallscapes@aol.com
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 6, 2001
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      > Muslim Conquests from the 7th to the 21st Centuries
      >
      > ....
      > Paul Fregosi
      > ....
      > "Jihad," the Muslim holy war against Christians and others, has raged for
      > 1,300 years with bloody conquests in Europe dating from campaigns to
      > convert the infidels in the 7th century to today's random acts of terrorism
      > in the name of Allah. Yet this huge unrecorded "hole" in European history
      > has been censored and stifled by political and literary authorities who
      > have feared reprisals from angry Muslims trying to hide a legacy of
      > brutality vastly more bloody and six times longer in duration than the
      > atrocities of the crusades. This is the engrossing factual account of the
      > immense and little-known Islamic military invasions of Europe, and the
      > major players who led them, beginning around 650 c.e. The Islamic Arabs
      > (and later the Moors) occupied a number of the Mediterranean Islands, and
      > invaded Spain and Portugal in 711 c.e., and ruled over much of the Iberian
      > peninsula for the next 800 years. France was attacked and invaded, as was
      > Italy, and the European coasts all the way to Ireland and Iceland. The
      > Muslims swept over the Balkans, besieged Vienna, and were intermittent
      > masters of Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, and Hungary into the 19th century,
      > destroying the Byzantines, taking Constantinople (turning it into
      > Istanbul). Ambitious and unrelenting, the Muslims also conquered most of
      > Russia. In a bright and brisk narrative, Paul Fregosi's unique and
      > provocative work is the first, and only, general history of the Jihad, the
      > most neglected and disregarded phenomenon in European history. Fregosi
      > faced a wall of opposition as he tried to publish this controversial book.
      > A publisher in Britain abruptly cancelled because of what some believe to
      > be fear of Muslim reprisals. "There's an intention to censor what's going
      > on about Islam, more so than for any other religion," Fregosi recently told
      > the London press. Paul Fregosi (Sydney, Australia), born in Marseilles and
      > educated in Britain, is the author of the widely praised Dreams of Empire:
      > Napoleon and the First World War 1792-1815.
    • Graham Edward Henderson
      I think there are some other holes missing in this review. One of the initial causes of the Islamic jihad against Europe was the Crusades. The
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 7, 2001
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        I think there are some other "holes" missing in this review. One of the initial causes of the Islamic "jihad" against Europe was the Crusades. The Franco-Latinist Crusaders totally pillaged Christian Orthodox and Muslim countries. There is one other interesting account of when the crusaders reached Jerusalem. A crusader envoy met with the Patriarch of Jerusalem, telling him they were there to "liberate" their brother Christians. The Patriarch responded that the Christians and Muslims were living together pretty harmoniously. It was only when the Crusaders marched into Jerusalem that Christians-Muslim relations began to really turn for the worse. Finally, the idea that the Ottoman Turks changed Constantinople to Istambul is totally false. The city of Constantinople was renamed Istambul in the early 1920's during Atta Turks reign. Atta Turk was anything but a devout Muslim. His drive was to totally secluarize Turkey. I can only guess that the pressure for the Ecumenical Patriarchate to change the liturgical calendar and to get more friendly with the Latin Pope was from the secular Turkish government of Atta Turk. Since Atta Turk, the government of Turkey's main objective is to be seen as a European secular state. The Ottoman Empire was a traditional Islamic state and  hostile to Western European culture. As far as the persecuation of Orthodoxy in Turkey, many Orthodox point to the reality that Orthodox clergymen are forbidden to wear their rassons in public. They fail to point out that it is also forbidden for Muslim women to wear the hajab. The force persecuting Orthodox believers in Turkey is not Islam but secularization.
         
        Reader Edward Henderson


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      • Michael Azkoul
        But Orthodoxy is not a Western religion --- nor, for that matter, a Christsian religion of the East . True, most of the mother churches of Orthodoxy are
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 8, 2001
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          But Orthodoxy is not a "Western religion" --- nor, for that matter, a "Christsian religion of the East".   True,  most of the mother churches of Orthodoxy are found in East Europe and Asia Minor, but that is historical circumstance not an ecclesiological attribute.  From a cultural point of view, she belongs as much to the West as she does to the East.  She has not only a Greek, but a Roman heritage; and, let us not forget the Old Testament or Hebrew dimension of Orthodoxy.  She is quite adaptable to any culture and nationality.  She is the Catholic Church.
          Fr Michael Azkoul  
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Sunday, October 07, 2001 2:14 PM
          Subject: [hocna] Review of the book "Jihad in the West Muslim Conquests...



          I think there are some other "holes" missing in this review. One of the initial causes of the Islamic "jihad" against Europe was the Crusades. The Franco-Latinist Crusaders totally pillaged Christian Orthodox and Muslim countries. There is one other interesting account of when the crusaders reached Jerusalem. A crusader envoy met with the Patriarch of Jerusalem, telling him they were there to "liberate" their brother Christians. The Patriarch responded that the Christians and Muslims were living together pretty harmoniously. It was only when the Crusaders marched into Jerusalem that Christians-Muslim relations began to really turn for the worse. Finally, the idea that the Ottoman Turks changed Constantinople to Istambul is totally false. The city of Constantinople was renamed Istambul in the early 1920's during Atta Turks reign. Atta Turk was anything but a devout Muslim. His drive was to totally secluarize Turkey. I can only guess that the pressure for the Ecumenical Patriarchate to change the liturgical calendar and to get more friendly with the Latin Pope was from the secular Turkish government of Atta Turk. Since Atta Turk, the government of Turkey's main objective is to be seen as a European secular state. The Ottoman Empire was a traditional Islamic state and  hostile to Western European culture. As far as the persecuation of Orthodoxy in Turkey, many Orthodox point to the reality that Orthodox clergymen are forbidden to wear their rassons in public. They fail to point out that it is also forbidden for Muslim women to wear the hajab. The force persecuting Orthodox believers in Turkey is not Islam but secularization.
           
          Reader Edward Henderson


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