Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Genetically engineered trees coming to Louisiana

Expand Messages
  • John Clark
    I thought you might be interested in this alarming and potentially ecologically disastrous development. Just last week, the USDA issued an Environmental
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 10, 2009
    • 0 Attachment

      I thought you might be interested in this alarming and potentially ecologically disastrous development.

       

      Just last week, the USDA issued an Environmental Assessment anticipating approval of 29 new field trials of a genetically engineered Eucalyptus variety that the Arborgen company is ultimately seeking to grow in plantations throughout the southern US.  One of the proposed test sites is in Louisiana , along with 2 in Alabama , 1 in Georgia , 2 in Mississippi , 5 in S. Carolina, 8 in Texas , and 10 in Florida .  As the attached alert explains further, this represents a serious threat to southern forests, and is one of the last regulatory hurdles before the company is approved (technically, 'deregulated') for unlimited commercial growing of these trees.  GE varieties of pine and poplar are also in the pipeline.

       

      There is a need for support in La. and other southern states for an ongoing effort to 1) oppose these field trials, and 2) get ready to oppose USDA deregulation of GE Eucalyptus, something Arborgen has already applied for. The trees are genetically engineered for several traits simultaneously: Cold tolerance, altered lignin (presumably reduced expression), reduced fertility (via barnase, an RNA-digesting enzyme), plus a kanamycin resistance marker gene.

       

      Here’s information on how to help:

       

      Please Forward Widely! 

       

      Dangerous Genetically Engineered (GE) Eucalyptus Trees on Fast-Track to Large-Scale Release in the U.S.

       

      ACTION NEEDED BY 6 JULY!  Tell the USDA NO WAY to ArborGen's Eucalyptus Frankentrees

       

      In an unprecedented move toward commercial large-scale release of GE forest trees in the United States, GE tree giant ArborGen is petitioning the U.S. government to be allowed to plant an estimated 260,000 flowering GE eucalyptus trees [1] across seven southern U.S. states on 330 acres in so-called "field trials."[2]

       

      The mass-planting of 260,000 flowering GE eucalyptus trees is a major step toward the unregulated development of large-scale GE eucalyptus plantations in the U.S.    ArborGen has already requested permission for the commercial planting of GE cold tolerant eucalyptus clones across the U.S. South.   The government is expected to issue their decision on this later this year. 

       

      Government approval of GE eucalyptus trees will set a dangerous precedent to allow other experimental GE forest trees, including poplar and pine, that would inevitably and irreversibly contaminate native trees with destructive GE traits, devastating forest ecosystems and wildlife.  Once GE trees escape, there is no way to call them back.

       

      The only way to stop genetic contamination of native forests is to ban the commercial release of GE trees before it is too late.

       

      Tell the USDA that GE cold-tolerant eucalyptus plantations pose an unprecedented threat to U.S. forests and wildlife.   Tell them to reject ArborGen's request to plant more than a quarter of a million dangerous alien GE trees on nearly 30 sites across the Southern U.S.   Since these field trials are a concrete step toward unregulated commercial growing of dangerous GE eucalyptus, they must be rejected.

       

       

      and

       

      Have your organization become a STOP GE Trees Campaign partner and endorse our goal of a global ban on GE trees!  For more information about the STOP GE Trees Campaign, click here

       

      Background:

      According to ArborGen, eucalyptus is a "fast-growing hardwood tree that is a favorite of the international forest products industry"[3]  Globally, forests in tropical and subtropical regions have been decimated for the development of eucalyptus plantations, with devastating results for communities and biodiversity.  ArborGen now wants to spread this disaster to new regions with their GE cold-tolerant eucalyptus.

       

      Some of the impacts caused by eucalyptus plantations that now threaten the U.S. include:

       

      * Widespread destruction of native forests: Australian Eucalyptus were introduced to California in the 1850s and these invasive aliens now grow throughout the state; more than 200 species have been introduced into the U.S.   The cold-tolerance trait will allow the disaster of eucalyptus plantations to be expanded into regions that are too cold for conventional eucalyptus--including the U.S. South.

       

      * Uncontrollable wildfires: Raging wildfires in Australia this year, made worse by drought, traveled over 60 miles an hour, devastating wildlife and killing 173 people.  The1991 Oakland, CA firestorm, exacerbated by eucalyptus, cost $1.5 billion in damages.

       

      * Loss of fresh water: Eucalyptus trees are fast-growing "water-suckers." They require tremendous amounts of water, threatening to worsen the drought already being experienced in areas of the Southern United States . 

       

      * Vast clearcutting of biodiverse forests to grow monoculture plantations of GE Eucalyptus clones;

       

      * Silent forests: Wildlife that cannot use the Eucalyptus for habitat nor food will be lost.  Endangered species will be threatened.

       

      * Contamination of soils and groundwater with toxic pesticides used on the plantations, often aerially sprayed;

       

      * Worsening of climate change through the destruction of carbon-rich native forests for carbon-poor plantations.

       

      * Eucalyptus is a known host for the deadly pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus Gattii. Originally a tropical fungus, it was recently found around Pacific Northwest Eucalyptus groves, and can kill both humans and wildlife.

       

       

       

      NOTES:

      [1] These GE eucalyptus, a hybrid of Eucalyptus grandis X Eucalyptus urophylla, are engineered to tolerate colder temperatuves, produce less of the structural polymer lignin, and digest some of their own RNA in the hope of reducing fertility (a Terminator-type genetic technology).  The permits, if granted, would also allow the GE trees to flower. Eucalyptus thrives in tropical to sub-tropical conditions, but ArborGen's cold-tolerant Eucalyptus would allow growth in the Southern United States , which experience occasional winter freezes. The states targeted for field trials are  Alabama , Florida , Georgia , Louisiana , Mississippi , South Carolina and Texas .  Note: in 2007 ArborGen was given permission to allow 1.1 acres of GE eucalyptus to flower.  This was expanded to 7.6 acres with no public input.  This means ArborGen could receive permission to expand these 330 acres of field trials after the fact.

       

      [2] The number 260,000 is based on the number of trees ArborGen reported to the USDA, which was recorded in the USDA's Environmental Assessment.

       

       

       

    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.