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Re: Hummingbird help

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  • Jennifer Gardner
    The allen s and the rufous are very hard to tell apart and your picture is pretty far away. Do you think it s a male? Check his back color. If he is brown
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 24 8:13 AM
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      The allen's and the rufous are very hard to tell apart and your
      picture is pretty far away. Do you think it's a male? Check his back
      color. If he is brown reddish, it's a rufous. If it's green, it
      might be an Allen's. I found this article helpful
      http://www.hummingbirdsplus.org/allens.html

      Jen Gardner - Mission Viejo
    • john small
      Oh yes Allens Hummingbirds do come to feeders. In fact I have an adult male Allens has virtually taken over my own feeder, and has been quite successful at
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 24 4:22 PM
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        Oh yes Allens Hummingbirds do come to feeders. In fact I have an adult male Allens has virtually
        taken over my own feeder, and has been quite successful at keeping other hummingbirds away.

        John Small









        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Doug
        Hi Jim, As Jennifer Gardner stated, identifying females and immatures of the Rufous/Allen s hummer complex in the field is close to impossible. These can only
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 24 5:22 PM
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          Hi Jim,

          As Jennifer Gardner stated, identifying females and immatures of the Rufous/Allen's hummer complex in the field is close to impossible. These can only positively be identified in the hand, or potentially from a close-up photo showing a detailed view of the spread tail. At this time of year either species could be present, as Rufous are migrating back through So Cal on their way to winter grounds. The odds would likely favor Allen's, as they've become common residents in much of the county (especially the lower elevations in the western portion of the county). I certainly have never heard anyone say that Allen's Hummingbirds don't visit feeders. I don't spend a whole lot of time watching hummer feeders (not having one myself), but from what I have seen (or heard from others), I'd say that Allen's spend considerable time at feeders (at least the resident subspecies that breeds in So Cal). The resident Allen's are very common of course in urban/suburban settings throughout the county. Rufous Hummingbirds (adult males at least, due the difficulty in identifying females/immatures) are regular in OC as migrants during early spring, usually in small numbers; however, they are rarely reported in the county during "fall" (which along the coast would typically be July and August). During late summer/fall, Rufous Hummingbirds appear to move south more commonly through the mountains of So Cal.

          Doug Willick
          Orange, CA

          --- In OrangeCountyBirding@yahoogroups.com, "jpreusch" <jpreusch@...> wrote:
          >
          > I have heard that Allen's HB's don't visit feeder's. Yet I think I have had an Allen's visiting our window feeder recently. I posted a photo (number 34) in the Hummingbird Album. Can someone help?
          >
          > Jim Preusch
          > Long Beach
          >
        • J Preusch
          Jen, Rob, Trish, Steve, Joe, Monte, Lori, Barbara, Al, Karen, Jim, Charles, Gillian, John, Donna, and Doug, Many thanks to everyone who responded to my
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 24 7:54 PM
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            Jen, Rob, Trish, Steve, Joe, Monte, Lori, Barbara, Al, Karen, Jim, Charles, Gillian, John, Donna, and Doug,

            Many thanks to everyone who responded to my hummingbird feeder question. The bird has been around regularly for a week, and I have been able to see the bird in more detail than my photo provides. With your guidance, I am incline to think this is a young male Allen's. He has taken ownership from the regular and constant stream of Anna's we have had for several years. I am not sure where I got the idea that Allen's would not use a feeder, but with the wonderful and overwhelming replies I received, I will promptly forget the myth.

            Again my thanks and appreciation to all,

            Jim Preusch
            Long Beach

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Jennifer Gardner
            Sent: Jul 24, 2012 8:13 AM
            To: OrangeCountyBirding@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [OrangeCountyBirding] Re: Hummingbird help

            The allen's and the rufous are very hard to tell apart and your
            picture is pretty far away. Do you think it's a male? Check his back
            color. If he is brown reddish, it's a rufous. If it's green, it
            might be an Allen's. I found this article helpful
            http://www.hummingbirdsplus.org/allens.html

            Jen Gardner - Mission Viejo
          • asekoonce
            I apologize for joining this discussion late, but I did want to correct one statement made in the on-line article cited below. Contrary to what is stated
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 24 8:40 PM
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              I apologize for joining this discussion late, but I did want to correct one statement made in the on-line article cited below. Contrary to what is stated there, it is indeed true that some (unknown) percentage of adult male Rufous Hummingbirds can have a green back. See the following:

              http://fieldguidetohummingbirds.wordpress.com/2010/09/06/rufous-vs-allens/

              See also the excellent guides to hummingbirds by Sheri Williamson and by Steve Howell.

              The takeaway is that while an adult male Rufous Hummingbird with an orange back is unmistakable, any other identification of the Rufous/Allen's complex, including adult male Allen's, can only be made conclusively by careful examination of photographs, especially of the spread tail. (The display dives of the two species' males are similar but distinguishable as well.)

              Of course, as Doug Willick points out, Rufous is extremely unlikely for a good portion of the year, while one subspecies of Allen's is resident on the coastal slope of southern CA. Thus, any Rufous/Allen's encountered outside the established range of dates for Rufous has a very high probability of being an Allen's. But we should all be aware that just because we see an adult male Rufous/Allen's with a green back, we cannot automatically assume with 100% certainty that it is an Allen's.

              Sandy

              Sandy Koonce
              Department of Mathematics
              University of Redlands, Redlands, CA 92373
              sandy_koonce@...

              --- In OrangeCountyBirding@yahoogroups.com, J Preusch <jpreusch@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Jen, Rob, Trish, Steve, Joe, Monte, Lori, Barbara, Al, Karen, Jim, Charles, Gillian, John, Donna, and Doug,
              >
              > Many thanks to everyone who responded to my hummingbird feeder question. The bird has been around regularly for a week, and I have been able to see the bird in more detail than my photo provides. With your guidance, I am incline to think this is a young male Allen's. He has taken ownership from the regular and constant stream of Anna's we have had for several years. I am not sure where I got the idea that Allen's would not use a feeder, but with the wonderful and overwhelming replies I received, I will promptly forget the myth.
              >
              > Again my thanks and appreciation to all,
              >
              > Jim Preusch
              > Long Beach
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: Jennifer Gardner
              > Sent: Jul 24, 2012 8:13 AM
              > To: OrangeCountyBirding@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [OrangeCountyBirding] Re: Hummingbird help
              >
              > The allen's and the rufous are very hard to tell apart and your
              > picture is pretty far away. Do you think it's a male? Check his back
              > color. If he is brown reddish, it's a rufous. If it's green, it
              > might be an Allen's. I found this article helpful
              > http://www.hummingbirdsplus.org/allens.html
              >
              > Jen Gardner - Mission Viejo
              >
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