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Huntington Central Park

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  • JOSEPH DELUCA
    Hello, My name is Joseph, and I have been living in the Westminster area for 4 years now, and just recently my 20 month old son and I stumbled upon the
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 1, 2004
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      Hello,

      My name is Joseph, and I have been living in the Westminster area for 4 years now, and just recently my 20 month old son and I stumbled upon the Huntington Central Park. He and I love to go there and take walks, and enjoy the mini-getaway from the urban sprawl that is orange county. The reason I am writing is to try to get some infromation on the birds that we see there. Two species in particular. There is a duck-like bird (pardon my bird ignorance) that is mostly black in color, smaller than most ducks in size, and they have these amazing feet that resemble leaves in their appearance. Any idea what kind of bird it is? The second type are the almost regal looking birds. There are two that frequent the park. They have long narrow legs, one is white the other is greyish-white. When you look at them you just kind of think they were kings at one time or antoher. Again, I'm sorry I can't be super descriptive....oh wait I have a picture...that would help, huh? Hope you get a
      chance to help me out. If not, at least point in the direction of resources that would help. Thank you for your time.

      Joseph

      Moderators Note: No attachments are allowed on emails to the group as a precaution against viruses. His picture shows a Great Blue Heron. We have advised Joseph in a separate email to get a good birding book and start learning the birds of the area (as well as checking out American Coot, Great Egret, Snowy Egret, and Great Blue Heron on the Internet).



      ---------------------------------
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      Protect your identity with Yahoo! Mail AddressGuard

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • borodayko
      Greetings, I spent 8:00AM to 11:30AM, today at Huntington Central Park mostly at the pond north of the library hoping the Franklin s Gull would return. But to
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 26, 2005
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        Greetings,

        I spent 8:00AM to 11:30AM, today at Huntington Central Park mostly at
        the pond north of the library hoping the Franklin's Gull would return.
        But to no avail, All that the pond offered today were about 17
        Bonapatre's Gulls in various stages of plummage from full breeding to
        non-breeding. There were several ducks there as well, Mallards, 3
        Gadwall, several Ruddy.

        The fenced garden had Anna's, Allen's, and Black-chinned Hummingbirds.

        Regards, Al Borodayko
        Cypress, CA
      • alfmo2002
        Birded the park late this a.m. and saw the following birds: site #3 - culvert on east side of island area - Plumbeous Vireo site #23 - about 25 feet east of
        Message 3 of 14 , Sep 23, 2005
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          Birded the park late this a.m. and saw the following birds:
          site #3 - culvert on east side of island area - Plumbeous Vireo
          site #23 - about 25 feet east of "wet area crossing" - N. Parula
          site #2 - about 50 feet north of this "crossing" - Juvie Blue Grosbeak
          also saw some Orange crown warblers, (fos) yellow rumped warbler, and
          (sorry Bob) nutmeg mannikens.
          Al Moreno
          L. LeRoy
        • cabepiano
          This morning (Friday) there is a Solitary Sandpiper in the Blackbird Pond in the Shipley Nature Center on the west side of HCP. There is also a Painted
          Message 4 of 14 , Sep 28, 2007
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            This morning (Friday) there is a Solitary Sandpiper in the Blackbird Pond in the Shipley Nature
            Center on the west side of HCP. There is also a Painted Redstart on the east side of the park
            in the Eucs north of the Cafe. I had second hand reports of a Black and White Warbler in the
            Island area and Blackpoll Warblers near the Slater Street parking lot. Dick Cabe
          • bed900hawo
            Birders, The park was jammed today - with people and birds. A Boy Scout Jamboree was on the east side and a track meet was all over the west side of the park.
            Message 5 of 14 , Oct 10, 2009
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              Birders,

              The park was jammed today - with people and birds. A Boy Scout Jamboree was on the east side and a track meet was all over the west side of the park. There was clearly an overnight push of migrants that included a few vagrants. A female Rose-breasted Grosbeak was in the dry basin in the northeast corner of the eastern half of the park (on other side of fence from maintenance yard). No report of the Ovenbird, but the wet spot and island area were completely overun by the boy scouts. Irene Horiuchi reported a Worm-eating Warbler and Chestnut-sided Warbler in eucalyptus trees west of Huntington Lake. Several birders were able to relocate the Chestnut-sided Warbler, but as of about 1230 no one had refound the Worm-eater.

              Good birding,

              Brian Daniels
            • george nash
              Where in HCP is Loren s bench? George Nash -Redlands Ca. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 14 , Sep 27, 2012
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                Where in HCP is Loren's bench?
                George Nash -Redlands Ca.


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • jpike44
                Trish, The Crescent Pond is a fine name for that spot. I vote we add it to the burgeoning glossary of HCP site-names. I further propose that the linear pond
                Message 7 of 14 , Nov 17, 2013
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                  Trish,

                  The "Crescent Pond" is a fine name for that spot. I vote we add it to the burgeoning glossary of HCP site-names. I further propose that the linear pond along the maintenance yard fence, just east of the second crossing be dubbed "Loren's Ditch." For twenty years, Loren was Mr. Central Park, and while he was still with us, we called the surrounding area "The Loren Hays Memorial Trail." If you weren't lucky enough to meet Loren, you can still sit on his bench at the SW corner of the Jack Green Nature Area ("Jack Green") near the Park Bench cafe and see if you can spot any new birds in the surrounding eucalyptus trees to add onto the bench-list.

                  As for the heading of an old post getting attached to your recent one, that is one of the more irksome 'innovations' of this revamping of the website by Yahoo. Who hasn't been confused the first time the title of your post happens to match a previously used title, and an ancient post appears in conjunction with yours?

                  Jim Pike
                  "Pishing Proponent"
                  Huntington Beach



                  "I've had one phone call and 2 emails asking where the crescent pond is
                  since I posted.
                  If you enter the park from the Slater Parking lot, go over the first bridge
                  and go to the left. It is on the right side, halfway to the next bridge
                  overcrossing."

                  Trish Gussler
                  Anaheim
                • jpike44
                  The female Rusty Blackbird (presumably first-cycle, on the basis of brown primary tips) flew up into a willow tree at around 4:30pm, called, gurgled, and
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jan 25, 2014
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                    The female Rusty Blackbird (presumably first-cycle, on the basis of brown primary tips) flew up into a willow tree at around 4:30pm, called, gurgled, and whistled for a few minutes, and then took to the sky, heading far to the southwest.

                    Of lesser note, a Yellow Warbler was in a eucalyptus tree along Golden West Street, about 75yds south of the Park Bench cafe. On the Huntington Lake side of the park, along Inlet Drive off Edwards Street, a White-throated Sparrow was feeding with White-crowneds near the plumbago shrubs. It was briefly joined by a pseudo-red Fox Sparrow, of the 'altivagans' race, with red-toned streaks on the underparts and indistinct streaks on the back. Also present was a drab first-cycle female Black-and-White Warbler in the adjacent eucalyptus trees, first found by Steve Morris on the CBC.

                    Jim Pike
                    HB
                  • alcyonaria
                    We birded Huntington Central Park this morning (Sat 2/22) and found a few of the continuing rarities. The Rusty Blackbird was on the peninsula where it has
                    Message 9 of 14 , Feb 22, 2014
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                      We birded Huntington Central Park this morning (Sat 2/22) and found a few of the continuing rarities.  The Rusty Blackbird was on the peninsula where it has been reported previously.  A Red-breasted Sapsucker was in the same area. The Northern Waterthrush was both heard and seen well at Loren's Ditch. One or two Golden-crowned Kinglets were still in that area as well, as was a Nashville Warbler. We had a Nashville Warbler in that same area two months ago, so maybe this bird has been around all winter?

                      Good birding,
                      Cathy McFadden & Paul Clarke
                      Claremont
                    • alcyonaria
                      I ve been asked to clarify where the Northern Waterthrush was seen yesterday, and simultaneously chastised (offline) for echoing numerous recent reports by
                      Message 10 of 14 , Feb 23, 2014
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                        I've been asked to clarify where the Northern Waterthrush was seen yesterday, and simultaneously chastised (offline) for echoing numerous recent reports by referring to the spot as Loren's Ditch. I'm not an OC birder and don't bird HCP frequently enough to know all of the accepted terminology, but I've been informed that "Loren's Ditch is not known by anyone except apparently a few people now, and therefore of no value to the general birding public."  So, to find the spot where the waterthrush was, enter at Slater St. parking lot, go straight across the first small footbridge and about 100 yds later bear left at the first fork in the path until you reach the second footbridge (aka the spot where the Golden-crowned Kinglets have been seen all winter).  Across the bridge and in to the left is a small pond that backs up against the maintenance yard fence. I assume this is Loren's Ditch.  Whether I'm correct about that or not, it is where the waterthrush was seen yesterday.

                        Cheers,
                        Cathy McFadden
                        Claremont
                      • rogerschoedl
                        While watching the WINTER WREN this morning (seen and heard by many) at Huntington Central Park I heard the yank yank call of a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH come
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jan 1
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                          While watching the WINTER WREN this morning (seen and heard by many) at Huntington Central Park I heard the "yank yank" call of a  RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH come once from the eucs on the east side of the boggy pond. I also heard a PURPLE FINCH toward the Slater lot. The NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH called intermittently from the vicinity of the fallen pepper tree on the north side of the boggy pond but was not as cooperative as the wren. Also saw 1 VARIED THRUSH in a pepper tree at the far west end of the broad lawn west of the Gothard lot. Many of the reed stands around Talbert Lake were mowed down so some of the resident exotics - Orange-cheeked Waxbills, Bronze Mannikins, and Scaly-breasted Munias - are now appearing at the boggy pond where the wren and waterthrush are. It was a productive albeit brisk morning to begin the new year.

                           

                          Roger Schoedl

                          Huntington Beach

                        • jpike44
                          I now understand (not really) that vegetation is being removed during the avian breeding season in an effort to thwart the homeless from camping in the park. I
                          Message 12 of 14 , May 21
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                            I now understand (not really) that vegetation is being removed during the avian breeding season in an effort to thwart the homeless from camping in the park. I can appreciate that this is a problem at the park, as it is in riparian areas throughout southern California. However, current attempts at a solution to this problem are invariably at the cost of habitat to birds, especially those that are secretive in nature and require low, dense foliage. Thus, I'm told that a location that recently harbored a wintering Northern Waterthrush and a Winter Wren, will likely not harbor either in the future. And, given that both the Jack Green nature area and the famed 'island' are also prone to visitations by the homeless, is there any reason to believe that they too won't be denuded by park personnel in the weeks or months ahead? Huntington Central Park has been a premier place to bird in the county because it was once replete with what are now dwindling commodities in the county, healthy native willows and shrubs, and low, rank, weedy undergrowth. I'm sure that park personnel would prefer that all of the park was more like Mile Square Park (or, after the most recent bout of trimming, the western side of the park), with expansive manicured lawns and tall, overly-trimmed trees, and no place for a tent (or bird) to hide. One day I expect they'll achieve their goal.

                            Jim Pike
                            HB
                          • mike7801
                            Too much to lose... West of the island area, 33.70479 -118.00291, 6am, 6-27-2015 Hooded warbler, Least bell s vireo, Yellow warbler, Common yellowthroat,
                            Message 13 of 14 , Jun 27
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                              Too much to lose...

                              West of the "island" area, 33.70479 -118.00291, 6am, 6-27-2015
                              Hooded warbler,
                              Least bell's vireo,
                              Yellow warbler,
                              Common yellowthroat,
                              Pacific-slope Flycatcher,
                              Robin...

                              https://flic.kr/p/ujQWAu

                              https://flic.kr/p/vgNfmM

                              Mike Huang
                              Irvine
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