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Re: [OldRockets] Semrocs?

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  • charles russell
    That was my catalog posted on the ninfinger site. I received a nice thank you and a heads up that Sven was shipping all of the catalogs back. He is the one
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 1, 2002
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      That was my catalog posted on the ninfinger site. I received a nice thank
      you and a heads up that Sven was shipping all of the catalogs back. He is
      the one who deserves all of the thanks and praise. Some of the catalogs
      are, uh - different, but it shows that there have always been small
      companies trying to make a go of it.
      I do not know if Semrocs produced all of the motors in the catalog. That
      was a long time ago and all I can remember is that I did purchase a pak of
      A8-3s to see what they were like before committing the big bucks for the
      other motors. Flew one A, but don't recall the results. The other two are
      in my collection. A while back the owner chined in on this forum or rol.
      Later AVI produced 18mm D6.1's in their Gold Series. When they worked they
      were neat. There was also the Cox D8 that was only 11-12 nt-sec in a
      standard 18mm case. D8-3 was nifty in a heavy model.
      Hope this helps some.

      Chas


      >From: sej@...
      >Reply-To: OldRockets@yahoogroups.com
      >To: OldRockets@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: [OldRockets] Semrocs?
      >Date: Mon, 30 Sep 2002 21:57:24 EDT
      >
      >The Ninfinger site has a catalog up for Semrocs. (It's actually disguised
      >as
      >a sort of magazine.)
      >
      >They have a whole bunch of odd motors, including what appears to be a 18mm
      >D
      >motor. Two, actually; a "3/4D6" and a "D6". (They also have 3/4C6...). Plus
      >short and micro motors.
      >
      >Were these produced, or vaporware?
      >
      >Stefan




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    • doug holverson
      Can anybody tell me the history behind Semroc? Or Foxmitter? Did they go on to become the Transroc or the Altair 8800? BTW- It s scary about how many of these
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 14, 2002
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        Can anybody tell me the history behind Semroc?

        Or Foxmitter? Did they go on to become the Transroc or the Altair 8800?

        BTW- It's scary about how many of these model rocket companies have come and
        gone. Especially when you're one that's flirting with gone.

        DGH
        (But I am toying with plans for a came back (cf: "Balsa is back!"))
      • Laird D Kelly
        ... Apparently, the Transroc *was* based on the Foxmitter (according to r.m.r Model Rocketry Payloads FAQ) and one of the Stine handbooks
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 14, 2002
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          On Mon Oct 14, 2002 1:20 pm doug holverson <dholverson@c...> writes:

          >
          > Or Foxmitter? Did they go on to become the Transroc or the Altair 8800?
          >

          <checking my notes>
          Apparently, the Transroc *was* based on the Foxmitter (according to r.m.r
          Model Rocketry Payloads FAQ) and one of the Stine handbooks referred to a
          commercial version of the Foxmitter sold by Competition Model Rockets and
          stated that the Transroc was designed by Earl Estes (Vern's brother).

          Altair 8800? Close, but no cigar 8-) M.I.T.S. (Micro Instrumentation and
          Telemetry Systems) *did* start out with a rocketry beacon however (a) it
          was a flashing light instead of a radio transmitter , and, (b) the
          creator was Forrest M. Mims III rather than Richard Fox >;->

          Now, if I could just lay my hands on copies of the Transroc accessory
          module assembly instructions (I have a copie of the instructions for the
          basic Transroc but not the telemetry modules) and/or the original
          Foxmitter plans (version 1 May-Dec 1969, v. 2 June 1970-Jan 1971, v. 3
          Sept 1971 Model Rocketry I believe) to do a little cloning 8-)

          > BTW- It's scary about how many of these model rocket companies have
          come and
          > gone. Especially when you're one that's flirting with gone.
          >


          Indeed 8-) 8-(


          now let's see if Yahoogroups will let me back on the list (one of Juno's
          servers was slow last week so Yahoo cut me off last night &^^$%%)

          ._, INET laird.kelly@...
          C(O-O)@ Sholem aleichem FIDO 1:138/255, 1:123/140
          --o00-(_)-00o---------------------------------------------
          WSU Master Gardener, GOA, NAR #77280, UPCHUG, *Team AMiGA*
        • Carl McLawhorn
          ... Semroc was incorporated in 1968 as Southeastern Model Rocket Corporation in Raleigh, North Carolina while I was a student at North Carolina State
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 14, 2002
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            doug holverson [mailto:dholverson@...] wrote:


            >> Can anybody tell me the history behind Semroc?



            Semroc was incorporated in 1968 as Southeastern Model Rocket Corporation
            in Raleigh, North Carolina while I was a student at North Carolina State
            University. Convincing a small group of investors in my home town of
            Ayden, North Carolina to invest in a small corporation, the company was
            re-incorporated as Semroc Astronautics Corporation on December 31,
            1969. At the same time we added over 200 stockholders in the new
            corporation.

            Originally, we planned on producing kits and buying engines from Estes
            as Centuri was doing at the time. On June 6, 1968, we received our
            answer. Estes Industries would not supply engines to our company. Work
            began on our own "Mabel" to produce our engines. Many long hours later
            we had a machine that would produce a complete A engine in about 12
            seconds, a C in about 17 seconds.

            At the peak, we had twenty five employees working at two facilities. One
            was R&D, printing, shipping, and general office and the other was
            outside town and handled all production and engine manufacturing. In
            early 1971, we attempted to recapitalize to ramp up to keep up with
            demand, but a bad local and national economy prevented us from being
            able to keep the company solvent.

            We had some very innovative products in prototype and limited production
            stages. We had an 18mm D engine with a 3.8 second burn, 3/4C and 3/4D
            engines for future contest certification, a DECAP (Delay-ejection charge
            auxiliary package), a dual-burn D engine, and several new kits. The
            DECAP was a 13mm diameter by 25mm long package that consisted only of a
            delay and ejection charge, with delays from 2 to 10 seconds. It was
            glued in a standard zero-delay (booster) engine to convert it into a
            timed engine so you could get any delay time from any engine. The
            dual-burn D burned normally for 2 seconds, delayed with no thrust for 2
            seconds, and then finished the burn at just under 2 seconds. Very
            impressive with much higher altitudes.

            After 31 years of dreaming, Semroc Astronautics Corporation was
            reincorporated last April 2, 2002 and will be producing kits in the near
            future.

            Carl McLawhorn
            NAR #4717





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Wolfram v.Kiparski
            ... That s an awesome story, Carl. What ever happened to your motor-making machine? Wolfram
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 14, 2002
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              At 09:36 PM 10/14/2002 -0400, Carl wrote:

              >After 31 years of dreaming, Semroc Astronautics Corporation was
              >reincorporated last April 2, 2002 and will be producing kits in the near
              >future.

              That's an awesome story, Carl. What ever happened to your motor-making
              machine?

              Wolfram
            • doug holverson
              ... I will contact your company for a job if I ever get the message from Fishman that Fun Rockets has officially jumped the shark. In fact, I have an unused
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 7, 2002
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                > From: "Carl McLawhorn" <carl@...>
                > Reply-To: OldRockets@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Mon, 14 Oct 2002 21:36:11 -0400
                > To: <OldRockets@yahoogroups.com>
                > Subject: RE: [OldRockets] Semrocs?
                >
                > doug holverson [mailto:dholverson@...] wrote:
                >
                >
                >>> Can anybody tell me the history behind Semroc?
                >
                >
                >
                > Semroc was incorporated in 1968 as Southeastern Model Rocket Corporation
                > in Raleigh, North Carolina while I was a student at North Carolina State
                > University. Convincing a small group of investors in my home town of
                > Ayden, North Carolina to invest in a small corporation, the company was
                > re-incorporated as Semroc Astronautics Corporation on December 31,
                > 1969. At the same time we added over 200 stockholders in the new
                > corporation.
                >
                > Originally, we planned on producing kits and buying engines from Estes
                > as Centuri was doing at the time. On June 6, 1968, we received our
                > answer. Estes Industries would not supply engines to our company. Work
                > began on our own "Mabel" to produce our engines. Many long hours later
                > we had a machine that would produce a complete A engine in about 12
                > seconds, a C in about 17 seconds.
                >
                > At the peak, we had twenty five employees working at two facilities. One
                > was R&D, printing, shipping, and general office and the other was
                > outside town and handled all production and engine manufacturing. In
                > early 1971, we attempted to recapitalize to ramp up to keep up with
                > demand, but a bad local and national economy prevented us from being
                > able to keep the company solvent.
                >
                > We had some very innovative products in prototype and limited production
                > stages. We had an 18mm D engine with a 3.8 second burn, 3/4C and 3/4D
                > engines for future contest certification, a DECAP (Delay-ejection charge
                > auxiliary package), a dual-burn D engine, and several new kits. The
                > DECAP was a 13mm diameter by 25mm long package that consisted only of a
                > delay and ejection charge, with delays from 2 to 10 seconds. It was
                > glued in a standard zero-delay (booster) engine to convert it into a
                > timed engine so you could get any delay time from any engine. The
                > dual-burn D burned normally for 2 seconds, delayed with no thrust for 2
                > seconds, and then finished the burn at just under 2 seconds. Very
                > impressive with much higher altitudes.
                >
                > After 31 years of dreaming, Semroc Astronautics Corporation was
                > reincorporated last April 2, 2002 and will be producing kits in the near
                > future.
                >
                > Carl McLawhorn
                > NAR #4717
                >
                I will contact your company for a job if I ever get the message from Fishman
                that Fun Rockets has officially jumped the shark. In fact, I have an unused
                injection molded launch pad design that I'd sell the rights to you right
                now.

                DGH
              • sej@aol.com
                In a message dated 11/7/02 5:34:05 PM Pacific Standard Time, ... Fascinating! I really wish you could produce motors again. Probably prohibitive, regulation
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 7, 2002
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                  In a message dated 11/7/02 5:34:05 PM Pacific Standard Time,
                  dholverson@... writes:


                  > > After 31 years of dreaming, Semroc Astronautics Corporation was
                  > > reincorporated last April 2, 2002 and will be producing kits in the near
                  > > future.
                  >

                  Fascinating!

                  I really wish you could produce motors again. Probably prohibitive,
                  regulation wise, but one can dream.


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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