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Re: [OjibweLanguageSocietyMiinawaa] Brief Intro

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  • Zhimmy Kanata
    Boozhoo Here is a good link http://www.anishinaabemdaa.com/language.htm also Youtube Ojibwa and you will get some results there too. Baama Zhimmy
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 1, 2009
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      Boozhoo

      Here is a good link

      http://www.anishinaabemdaa.com/language.htm

      also Youtube Ojibwa and you will get some results there too.

      Baama

      Zhimmy



      ________________________________
      From: jenn <grrlofthemoon@...>
      To: OjibweLanguageSocietyMiinawaa@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2009 3:11:08 PM
      Subject: [OjibweLanguageSocietyMiinawaa] Brief Intro





      Hello,
      my name is Jenn, and I have joined this group in order to learn the language of my ancestors. I feel that it is crucial for me to do so in order to pass the knowledge along to my children so they grow to be proud of their heritage and can speak in the language of their forefathers and foremothers.

      I am finding lessons are in short supply in a face to face setting, so am now searching for online resources to help me along this journey. If anyone in this group knows of some, please pass along the information to me so that I can learn.

      I look forward to learning, sharing, and growing with all of you. Thank you.

      jenn





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    • Zhimmy Kanata
      Boozhoo...   This is a column from a prominent French Canadian Journalist. I think she does a really good job talking about what it really takes to preserve a
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 1, 2009
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        Boozhoo...
         
        This is a column from a prominent French Canadian Journalist.

        I think she does a really good job talking about what it really takes to preserve a language.

        Baama

        Zhimmy


        Vigilance essential for French TheStar.com - Columnist - Vigilance essential for French
        July 01, 2009 Chantal Hébert
        MONTREAL
        Raising young children in Toronto in the early eighties, we hooked them on Passe-Partout, Télé-Québec's popular preschool program, and restricted television access to the length of the half-hour daily episodes.
        The only language spoken at home was French, and both kids were home-schooled to read in their mother tongue long before they could decipher a word of English. That was part and parcel of bulletproofing our kids for the inevitable day when they ventured into the largely English-speaking Ontario world.
        A few years later, a move to Ottawa, a city where French has a greater presence, brought some relaxation to the parental rules, and we mostly let down our guard when Montreal became our home a decade after that.
        Mostly, but not completely. In the age of video games and the Internet, raising children who are as competent as they should be in French is a challenge, even in Canada's French-speaking metropolis.
        Rationing English in favour of French paid off. Our adult sons switch effortlessly from one language to the other, and they have to think twice when they are asked whether the movie they are watching or the book they are reading is in French or English.
        In most regions of Canada, English-speaking parents have to work at ensuring their children acquire and maintain second-language skills in French, but it is a rare francophone who, having set out to master English, has not been up to the task.
        Indeed, English is generally so pervasive that francophone families often have to guard their kids against "franglais," a mix of both languages that does not stand its speakers in good stead on either side of the language divide.
        A recent poll found that 90 per cent of francophone Quebecers worry about the status of the French language in Montreal. The opposite would have been a surprise. The notion that vigilance is essential if French is to continue to be a vibrant presence in North America has been bred in the bone of successive francophone generations. It is also borne out by the demographic realities.
        In many ways, Montreal is a linguistic success story. Home to the highest proportion of trilingual Canadians, its daily life is far more bilingual than Ottawa's, the capital of a country that purports to have two official languages.
        Almost half of Montrealers speak a language other than French at home and the number is growing. But while the power of attraction of English ensures that it is the common language of multicultural Toronto, French would hardly be as dominant as it is in Montreal without some legislative assistance. Over the past three decades, the obligation for newcomers to the province to have their children educated in the French school system has ensured they no longer massively bypass French on the way to adopting English as their sole default official language.
        The federal Official Languages Act has also turned proficiency in French into a professional asset rather than a cultural pursuit. Over that same period, concern over the shrinking place of French in an increasingly English-speaking wired universe had spread to the whole of the Francophonie. The attraction of English has increased while the influence of many other languages has decreased.
        As the debate over the future of the planet's linguistic diversity has become global, the limits of local legislative solutions have become obvious. That is why even as Quebecers fret over the place of French in the Montreal of tomorrow, most do not want to reopen the Pandora's box of the language laws.
        Have a good Canada Day!


        __________________________________________________________________
        Ask a question on any topic and get answers from real people. Go to Yahoo! Answers and share what you know at http://ca.answers.yahoo.com

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • john lagrew
        My two cents worth,I live in the Philippines and the primary language here is Tagalog, my three grandchildren live in the downstairs apt. . and the language
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 1, 2009
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          My two cents worth,I live in the Philippines and the primary language here is Tagalog, my three grandchildren live in the downstairs apt.
          . and the language spoken there is Tagalog, they do however spend a lot of time upstairs with their Grandmother and me.In our household the primary language is English, I say without hesitation that all three Grandchildren are fluent in both languages, my point being that if you expose children to multple languages theywill learn multiple languages, especially if they have no interference  from adults.--- On Wed, 7/1/09, Zhimmy Kanata <kanata_zhimmagish@...> wrote:


          From: Zhimmy Kanata <kanata_zhimmagish@...>
          Subject: [OjibweLanguageSocietyMiinawaa] Column to take note of
          To: OjibweLanguageSocietyMiinawaa@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wednesday, 1 July, 2009, 4:38 AM








          Boozhoo...
           
          This is a column from a prominent French Canadian Journalist.

          I think she does a really good job talking about what it really takes to preserve a language.

          Baama

          Zhimmy

          Vigilance essential for French TheStar.com - Columnist - Vigilance essential for French
          July 01, 2009 Chantal Hébert
          MONTREAL
          Raising young children in Toronto in the early eighties, we hooked them on Passe-Partout, Télé-Québec's popular preschool program, and restricted television access to the length of the half-hour daily episodes.
          The only language spoken at home was French, and both kids were home-schooled to read in their mother tongue long before they could decipher a word of English. That was part and parcel of bulletproofing our kids for the inevitable day when they ventured into the largely English-speaking Ontario world.
          A few years later, a move to Ottawa, a city where French has a greater presence, brought some relaxation to the parental rules, and we mostly let down our guard when Montreal became our home a decade after that.
          Mostly, but not completely. In the age of video games and the Internet, raising children who are as competent as they should be in French is a challenge, even in Canada's French-speaking metropolis.
          Rationing English in favour of French paid off. Our adult sons switch effortlessly from one language to the other, and they have to think twice when they are asked whether the movie they are watching or the book they are reading is in French or English.
          In most regions of Canada, English-speaking parents have to work at ensuring their children acquire and maintain second-language skills in French, but it is a rare francophone who, having set out to master English, has not been up to the task.
          Indeed, English is generally so pervasive that francophone families often have to guard their kids against "franglais," a mix of both languages that does not stand its speakers in good stead on either side of the language divide.
          A recent poll found that 90 per cent of francophone Quebecers worry about the status of the French language in Montreal. The opposite would have been a surprise. The notion that vigilance is essential if French is to continue to be a vibrant presence in North America has been bred in the bone of successive francophone generations. It is also borne out by the demographic realities.
          In many ways, Montreal is a linguistic success story. Home to the highest proportion of trilingual Canadians, its daily life is far more bilingual than Ottawa's, the capital of a country that purports to have two official languages.
          Almost half of Montrealers speak a language other than French at home and the number is growing. But while the power of attraction of English ensures that it is the common language of multicultural Toronto, French would hardly be as dominant as it is in Montreal without some legislative assistance. Over the past three decades, the obligation for newcomers to the province to have their children educated in the French school system has ensured they no longer massively bypass French on the way to adopting English as their sole default official language.
          The federal Official Languages Act has also turned proficiency in French into a professional asset rather than a cultural pursuit. Over that same period, concern over the shrinking place of French in an increasingly English-speaking wired universe had spread to the whole of the Francophonie. The attraction of English has increased while the influence of many other languages has decreased.
          As the debate over the future of the planet's linguistic diversity has become global, the limits of local legislative solutions have become obvious. That is why even as Quebecers fret over the place of French in the Montreal of tomorrow, most do not want to reopen the Pandora's box of the language laws.
          Have a good Canada Day!

          ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
          Ask a question on any topic and get answers from real people. Go to Yahoo! Answers and share what you know at http://ca.answers yahoo.com

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

















          New Email addresses available on Yahoo!
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        • Dario Malovic
          buuzhuu  The article indeed gets close to hitting the nail in the head. However, French language is not an endangered language. Nor in Canada or elsewhere.
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 2, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            buuzhuu  The article indeed gets close to hitting the nail in the head. However, French language is not an endangered language. Nor in Canada or elsewhere. Endangered languages in Canada are indigenous languages spoken before and after the time of Euro-American colonization. I firmly believe that the reason that (most) indigenous languages are dying is primarily that the educators around the country were and still are teaching an educational lie. That educational lie is that if your children grow up speaking their language of heritage as their first language that will interfere with their English language acquisition and it will impede their success in the elementary and high school and so on and consequently they will not be successful in the "real" world. Recent studies of Cherokee speaking students show that these student have better success in the school also because they learned Cherokee as their first language and English as their second language
            (that means later in life)... The second thing is that along with that lie, indigenous peoples faced boarding schools era when educators were teaching them how to assimilate into the dominant society. Very often it was implemented by imposing a culture of shame on Indian children teaching them that their language(s) are of lesser value and civilizational dignity than English language. A lot of transmission from parents to children stopped in the time of boarding school era. However, we can' t undo the past and it is of little use lamenting about it. Indigenous peoples are now in situation where there is no-body to blame anymore. Victim mentality is never a fruitful thing. Among other things, that means taking the business of teaching the children language of heritage into their own hands. Parents and schools and family and community are now responsible for creating an environment where children would feel proud and would want to learn their language. In
            the end, how many children grow up speaking their ancestral tongue, especially in their families, will show up what future indigenous languages face in the future.

            giigawaabamin miinawa, D/

            --- On Wed, 7/1/09, Zhimmy Kanata <kanata_zhimmagish@...> wrote:

            From: Zhimmy Kanata <kanata_zhimmagish@...>
            Subject: [OjibweLanguageSocietyMiinawaa] Column to take note of
            To: OjibweLanguageSocietyMiinawaa@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2009, 4:38 AM

















            Boozhoo...



            This is a column from a prominent French Canadian Journalist.



            I think she does a really good job talking about what it really takes to preserve a language.



            Baama



            Zhimmy



            Vigilance essential for French TheStar.com - Columnist - Vigilance essential for French

            July 01, 2009 Chantal Hébert

            MONTREAL

            Raising young children in Toronto in the early eighties, we hooked them on Passe-Partout, Télé-Québec's popular preschool program, and restricted television access to the length of the half-hour daily episodes.

            The only language spoken at home was French, and both kids were home-schooled to read in their mother tongue long before they could decipher a word of English. That was part and parcel of bulletproofing our kids for the inevitable day when they ventured into the largely English-speaking Ontario world.

            A few years later, a move to Ottawa, a city where French has a greater presence, brought some relaxation to the parental rules, and we mostly let down our guard when Montreal became our home a decade after that.

            Mostly, but not completely. In the age of video games and the Internet, raising children who are as competent as they should be in French is a challenge, even in Canada's French-speaking metropolis.

            Rationing English in favour of French paid off. Our adult sons switch effortlessly from one language to the other, and they have to think twice when they are asked whether the movie they are watching or the book they are reading is in French or English.

            In most regions of Canada, English-speaking parents have to work at ensuring their children acquire and maintain second-language skills in French, but it is a rare francophone who, having set out to master English, has not been up to the task.

            Indeed, English is generally so pervasive that francophone families often have to guard their kids against "franglais," a mix of both languages that does not stand its speakers in good stead on either side of the language divide.

            A recent poll found that 90 per cent of francophone Quebecers worry about the status of the French language in Montreal. The opposite would have been a surprise. The notion that vigilance is essential if French is to continue to be a vibrant presence in North America has been bred in the bone of successive francophone generations. It is also borne out by the demographic realities.

            In many ways, Montreal is a linguistic success story. Home to the highest proportion of trilingual Canadians, its daily life is far more bilingual than Ottawa's, the capital of a country that purports to have two official languages.

            Almost half of Montrealers speak a language other than French at home and the number is growing. But while the power of attraction of English ensures that it is the common language of multicultural Toronto, French would hardly be as dominant as it is in Montreal without some legislative assistance. Over the past three decades, the obligation for newcomers to the province to have their children educated in the French school system has ensured they no longer massively bypass French on the way to adopting English as their sole default official language.

            The federal Official Languages Act has also turned proficiency in French into a professional asset rather than a cultural pursuit. Over that same period, concern over the shrinking place of French in an increasingly English-speaking wired universe had spread to the whole of the Francophonie. The attraction of English has increased while the influence of many other languages has decreased.

            As the debate over the future of the planet's linguistic diversity has become global, the limits of local legislative solutions have become obvious. That is why even as Quebecers fret over the place of French in the Montreal of tomorrow, most do not want to reopen the Pandora's box of the language laws.

            Have a good Canada Day!



            ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _

            Ask a question on any topic and get answers from real people. Go to Yahoo! Answers and share what you know at http://ca.answers yahoo.com



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]































            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Gene Peltier
            This is the most artical I have read in a very long time.It is Great My Brother.I joined the society a short time ago wanting to learn my own language ,before
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 2, 2009
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              This is the most artical I have read in a very long time.It is Great My Brother.I joined the society a short time ago wanting to learn my own language ,before I leavethe world,I found out 38 years ago that I was Ojibway,why  he waited so long to tell me the truth I have no Idea,just befote he passed he told me the whole story,in fact they were some of his last words,he also told me that I was born on the Red Lake Rez in Minnessota,his name is Joseph Peltier.I am Genne Peltier Age 65 and very proud that I am Native American,I was raised in an orphenage tell age 15 and was always told that the Native Language was of the devil,did.nt now from what culture I came back then,but damn sure know now.Thank you My Brother for the artical.And could you please tell me what is the meaning of waajiye,I have beentold that it means goodby My father told me that wordbefore he keft.Thank you for you eye's and ear's my Brother,your artical has been copied,enlarged and put
              in frame on wall by my Pc.............Gene Peltier

              --- On Thu, 7/2/09, Dario Malovic <dariomalovic@...> wrote:


              From: Dario Malovic <dariomalovic@...>
              Subject: Re: [OjibweLanguageSocietyMiinawaa] Column to take note of
              To: OjibweLanguageSocietyMiinawaa@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Thursday, July 2, 2009, 11:56 AM


              buuzhuu  The article indeed gets close to hitting the nail in the head. However, French language is not an endangered language. Nor in Canada or elsewhere. Endangered languages in Canada are indigenous languages spoken before and after the time of Euro-American colonization. I firmly believe that the reason that (most) indigenous languages are dying is primarily that the educators around the country were and still are teaching an educational lie. That educational lie is that if your children grow up speaking their language of heritage as their first language that will interfere with their English language acquisition and it will impede their success in the elementary and high school and so on and consequently they will not be successful in the "real" world. Recent studies of Cherokee speaking students show that these student have better success in the school also because they learned Cherokee as their first language and English as their second language
              (that means later in life)... The second thing is that along with that lie, indigenous peoples faced boarding schools era when educators were teaching them how to assimilate into the dominant society. Very often it was implemented by imposing a culture of shame on Indian children teaching them that their language(s) are of lesser value and civilizational dignity than English language. A lot of transmission from parents to children stopped in the time of boarding school era. However, we can' t undo the past and it is of little use lamenting about it. Indigenous peoples are now in situation where there is no-body to blame anymore. Victim mentality is never a fruitful thing. Among other things, that means taking the business of teaching the children language of heritage into their own hands. Parents and schools and family and community are now responsible for creating an environment where children would feel proud and would want to learn their language. In
              the end, how many children grow up speaking their ancestral tongue, especially in their families, will show up what future indigenous languages face in the future.

              giigawaabamin miinawa, D/

              --- On Wed, 7/1/09, Zhimmy Kanata <kanata_zhimmagish@...> wrote:

              From: Zhimmy Kanata <kanata_zhimmagish@...>
              Subject: [OjibweLanguageSocietyMiinawaa] Column to take note of
              To: OjibweLanguageSocietyMiinawaa@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2009, 4:38 AM











                 
                         
                         


                   
                    Boozhoo...



              This is a column from a prominent French Canadian Journalist.



              I think she does a really good job talking about what it really takes to preserve a language.



              Baama



              Zhimmy



              Vigilance essential for French TheStar.com - Columnist - Vigilance essential for French

              July 01, 2009 Chantal Hébert

              MONTREAL

              Raising young children in Toronto in the early eighties, we hooked them on Passe-Partout, Télé-Québec's popular preschool program, and restricted television access to the length of the half-hour daily episodes.

              The only language spoken at home was French, and both kids were home-schooled to read in their mother tongue long before they could decipher a word of English. That was part and parcel of bulletproofing our kids for the inevitable day when they ventured into the largely English-speaking Ontario world.

              A few years later, a move to Ottawa, a city where French has a greater presence, brought some relaxation to the parental rules, and we mostly let down our guard when Montreal became our home a decade after that.

              Mostly, but not completely. In the age of video games and the Internet, raising children who are as competent as they should be in French is a challenge, even in Canada's French-speaking metropolis.

              Rationing English in favour of French paid off. Our adult sons switch effortlessly from one language to the other, and they have to think twice when they are asked whether the movie they are watching or the book they are reading is in French or English.

              In most regions of Canada, English-speaking parents have to work at ensuring their children acquire and maintain second-language skills in French, but it is a rare francophone who, having set out to master English, has not been up to the task.

              Indeed, English is generally so pervasive that francophone families often have to guard their kids against "franglais," a mix of both languages that does not stand its speakers in good stead on either side of the language divide.

              A recent poll found that 90 per cent of francophone Quebecers worry about the status of the French language in Montreal. The opposite would have been a surprise. The notion that vigilance is essential if French is to continue to be a vibrant presence in North America has been bred in the bone of successive francophone generations. It is also borne out by the demographic realities.

              In many ways, Montreal is a linguistic success story. Home to the highest proportion of trilingual Canadians, its daily life is far more bilingual than Ottawa's, the capital of a country that purports to have two official languages.

              Almost half of Montrealers speak a language other than French at home and the number is growing. But while the power of attraction of English ensures that it is the common language of multicultural Toronto, French would hardly be as dominant as it is in Montreal without some legislative assistance. Over the past three decades, the obligation for newcomers to the province to have their children educated in the French school system has ensured they no longer massively bypass French on the way to adopting English as their sole default official language.

              The federal Official Languages Act has also turned proficiency in French into a professional asset rather than a cultural pursuit. Over that same period, concern over the shrinking place of French in an increasingly English-speaking wired universe had spread to the whole of the Francophonie. The attraction of English has increased while the influence of many other languages has decreased.

              As the debate over the future of the planet's linguistic diversity has become global, the limits of local legislative solutions have become obvious. That is why even as Quebecers fret over the place of French in the Montreal of tomorrow, most do not want to reopen the Pandora's box of the language laws.

              Have a good Canada Day!



              ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _

              Ask a question on any topic and get answers from real people. Go to Yahoo! Answers and share what you know at http://ca.answers yahoo.com



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                   

                 
                 
                 
                   
                 
                 








                 


                 
                 


                   

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              ------------------------------------

              Mii gwech

              Yahoo! Groups Links








              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Dany Riopelle
              Aaniish naa.   Here s what Ojibwe Mekana has to say on this subject.   At the beginning of the manual for the Intermediate Level for their ojibwemowin
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 2, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Aaniish naa.
                 
                Here's what 'Ojibwe Mekana' has to say on this subject.
                 
                At the beginning of the manual for the Intermediate Level for their ojibwemowin course, there are two paragraphs, between which the student is encouraged to choose one to memorize.  It should be noted that the spelling used Ojibwe Mekana does not follow the Fiero Double Vowel system; having mentioned that, the two paragraphs [as they appear in the manual] are:
                 
                1), Giwe weenda mahgoom ayzhichi'gayong omah ayndahzhi anukeyong, inge igohnahn ah'ow bayzhig akiwayzee gah nahganinong, dahni'bimiwidoo'yung oh'ow gidinwaywininahn dabwah wahnitooyung, meenahwah da gikinuamahwungi'dwah in'giw wayschki'bimahdizijig oh'ow aynwayung, neena wind omah chi aynigook ni weekwahji'toomin gay ihzhi waynipanizi'yong oh'ow ayzhichi gayong, nitum ih'iw wah ihzhichi gayong, niwe gikinuamahwah nahnig in'giw wayneejahnisijig da ojibwaymo wahd, meesh gahyay weenahwah gay ihzhi gikinuamahwahwahd oneejahnisiwahn meenahwah inge ihgohnahn ah'ow bayzhig akiwayzee, gaween gidah ahyahzeemin oh'ow gidizhitwah'wininahn eeshpin ojibwaymosi'wung, me'iw waynji weekwahji tooyong we ishkonah'mong oh'ow gidinwaywini'nahn.
                 
                [I'm going to tell you what we are doing (here) where we work.  One old man that left us, told us to carry on our language before we lose it, and to teach the younger generation the language.  We are trying very hard to try and make it easy (what) we are doing here.  The first thing we will do is teach the parents the language; they in turn will teach their children.  The old man told us, without the language we wouldn't have our culture.  That's why we are trying to save our language.]
                 
                2), Neena wind omah akina gikinuamahgayong niwe nitah ojibwaymohmin, eeshpin dush gikayndahmong ih'iw ojibwaymo'win indah gikinuamahwah nahnig in'giw abinoojeeyug gahyay weenahwah da ojibwaymo'wahd, meenahwah ni nundomah nahnig in'giw chi ahya'og da weedokahwi yungidwah oh'ow ayzhichigayong eeshpin weedookohdahdi'yung gigah gushkitoomin da ojibwaymo'yung.
                 
                [All teachers are going to learn the Ojibwe language, if we learn the language we will teach the children the language.  We ask the elders to help us in what we are doing here.  If we all help each other we will learn the language!]
                 
                I guess the last sentence sums it up really well:  geeshpin wiidookodaadiyaang gigagashkitoomin daojibwemoyaang...if we all help each other, we will learn the language!
                 
                Baamaa for now, y'all.
                 
                Dany/Wemitigoozhi
                 


                --- On Thu, 7/2/09, Dario Malovic <dariomalovic@...> wrote:


                From: Dario Malovic <dariomalovic@...>
                Subject: Re: [OjibweLanguageSocietyMiinawaa] Column to take note of
                To: OjibweLanguageSocietyMiinawaa@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Thursday, July 2, 2009, 7:56 AM








                buuzhuu  The article indeed gets close to hitting the nail in the head. However, French language is not an endangered language. Nor in Canada or elsewhere. Endangered languages in Canada are indigenous languages spoken before and after the time of Euro-American colonization. I firmly believe that the reason that (most) indigenous languages are dying is primarily that the educators around the country were and still are teaching an educational lie. That educational lie is that if your children grow up speaking their language of heritage as their first language that will interfere with their English language acquisition and it will impede their success in the elementary and high school and so on and consequently they will not be successful in the "real" world. Recent studies of Cherokee speaking students show that these student have better success in the school also because they learned Cherokee as their first language and English as their second language
                (that means later in life)... The second thing is that along with that lie, indigenous peoples faced boarding schools era when educators were teaching them how to assimilate into the dominant society. Very often it was implemented by imposing a culture of shame on Indian children teaching them that their language(s) are of lesser value and civilizational dignity than English language. A lot of transmission from parents to children stopped in the time of boarding school era. However, we can' t undo the past and it is of little use lamenting about it. Indigenous peoples are now in situation where there is no-body to blame anymore. Victim mentality is never a fruitful thing. Among other things, that means taking the business of teaching the children language of heritage into their own hands. Parents and schools and family and community are now responsible for creating an environment where children would feel proud and would want to learn their language. In
                the end, how many children grow up speaking their ancestral tongue, especially in their families, will show up what future indigenous languages face in the future.

                giigawaabamin miinawa, D/

                --- On Wed, 7/1/09, Zhimmy Kanata <kanata_zhimmagish@ yahoo.ca> wrote:

                From: Zhimmy Kanata <kanata_zhimmagish@ yahoo.ca>
                Subject: [OjibweLanguageSoci etyMiinawaa] Column to take note of
                To: OjibweLanguageSocie tyMiinawaa@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2009, 4:38 AM

                Boozhoo...

                This is a column from a prominent French Canadian Journalist.

                I think she does a really good job talking about what it really takes to preserve a language.

                Baama

                Zhimmy

                Vigilance essential for French TheStar.com - Columnist - Vigilance essential for French

                July 01, 2009 Chantal Hébert

                MONTREAL

                Raising young children in Toronto in the early eighties, we hooked them on Passe-Partout, Télé-Québec's popular preschool program, and restricted television access to the length of the half-hour daily episodes.

                The only language spoken at home was French, and both kids were home-schooled to read in their mother tongue long before they could decipher a word of English. That was part and parcel of bulletproofing our kids for the inevitable day when they ventured into the largely English-speaking Ontario world.

                A few years later, a move to Ottawa, a city where French has a greater presence, brought some relaxation to the parental rules, and we mostly let down our guard when Montreal became our home a decade after that.

                Mostly, but not completely. In the age of video games and the Internet, raising children who are as competent as they should be in French is a challenge, even in Canada's French-speaking metropolis.

                Rationing English in favour of French paid off. Our adult sons switch effortlessly from one language to the other, and they have to think twice when they are asked whether the movie they are watching or the book they are reading is in French or English.

                In most regions of Canada, English-speaking parents have to work at ensuring their children acquire and maintain second-language skills in French, but it is a rare francophone who, having set out to master English, has not been up to the task.

                Indeed, English is generally so pervasive that francophone families often have to guard their kids against "franglais," a mix of both languages that does not stand its speakers in good stead on either side of the language divide.

                A recent poll found that 90 per cent of francophone Quebecers worry about the status of the French language in Montreal. The opposite would have been a surprise. The notion that vigilance is essential if French is to continue to be a vibrant presence in North America has been bred in the bone of successive francophone generations. It is also borne out by the demographic realities.

                In many ways, Montreal is a linguistic success story. Home to the highest proportion of trilingual Canadians, its daily life is far more bilingual than Ottawa's, the capital of a country that purports to have two official languages.

                Almost half of Montrealers speak a language other than French at home and the number is growing. But while the power of attraction of English ensures that it is the common language of multicultural Toronto, French would hardly be as dominant as it is in Montreal without some legislative assistance. Over the past three decades, the obligation for newcomers to the province to have their children educated in the French school system has ensured they no longer massively bypass French on the way to adopting English as their sole default official language.

                The federal Official Languages Act has also turned proficiency in French into a professional asset rather than a cultural pursuit. Over that same period, concern over the shrinking place of French in an increasingly English-speaking wired universe had spread to the whole of the Francophonie. The attraction of English has increased while the influence of many other languages has decreased.

                As the debate over the future of the planet's linguistic diversity has become global, the limits of local legislative solutions have become obvious. That is why even as Quebecers fret over the place of French in the Montreal of tomorrow, most do not want to reopen the Pandora's box of the language laws.

                Have a good Canada Day!

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