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What does it mean?

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  • Shawn St.Germaine
    Can anyone tell me what this Name means?? Way-Ge-maw-wa-be
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 1, 2007
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      Can anyone tell me what this Name means??
      Way-Ge-maw-wa-be
    • Qorach ben Dan
      Aaniin, Could it be Wegimaawebi to mean Chief-feather ?
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 1, 2007
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        Aaniin,
        Could it be "Wegimaawebi" to mean "Chief-feather"?

        --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn
        St.Germaine" <chippewa64@...> wrote:
        >
        > Can anyone tell me what this Name means??
        > Way-Ge-maw-wa-be
        >
      • Kees van Kolmeschate
        Aaniin Charlie, I miss the syllable GWAN which normally bears the meaning of feather , albeit indeed often in the combination gwanebi as in baw om be guon
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 2, 2007
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          Aaniin Charlie,

          I miss the syllable GWAN which normally bears the meaning
          of "feather", albeit indeed often in the combination "gwanebi"
          as in "baw om be guon abe" , translation given as "rising feather"
          and "kay ge she quon abe", translation given as "the fast feather".

          In general the meaning of -ebi is vague, at least in proper names,
          ex.:
          "ah be taw ge shig wabe" (aabita-giizhigwebi) translated as "half sky"
          "ay se ne waw ge wabe" (esiniiwajiwebi) translated as "rocky mountain"
          "may sko ge gish wabe" (meshkogiizhigwebi) translated as "red sky"
          "o ge mah waw ge wabe" (ogimaawajiwebi) translated as "chief of the
          mountain"

          Of course there VAI verbs ending in -ebi which adds to the meaning of
          the preceding part "while sitting"; the "e" of -ebi seems in most (if
          not all) cases belong to the first part, which causes the short "a"
          of "abi" (sit) to drop.
          Ex: "zaagitigwaanebi" one's head is visible while sitting,
          from "zaagitigwaane" one's head sticks out (with medial -tigwaan-
          head)
          "ishkwebi" sit at the end, from root "ishkwe-"

          It would seem to me that this "e" of these VAI verbs does not apply
          in the proper names.

          gr, Kees.




          --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Qorach ben
          Dan" <cjlippert@...> wrote:
          >
          > Aaniin,
          > Could it be "Wegimaawebi" to mean "Chief-feather"?
          >
          > --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn
          > St.Germaine" <chippewa64@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Can anyone tell me what this Name means??
          > > Way-Ge-maw-wa-be
          > >
          >
        • April Saint
          Ahneen Shawn Where are u from? My last name is St.Germaine too. Waabmin April St. Germaine Mountainlionspirit Qorach ben Dan wrote:
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 2, 2007
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            Ahneen Shawn

            Where are u from? My last name is St.Germaine too.

            Waabmin

            April St. Germaine
            Mountainlionspirit

            Qorach ben Dan <cjlippert@...> wrote:
            Aaniin,
            Could it be "Wegimaawebi" to mean "Chief-feather"?

            --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn
            St.Germaine" <chippewa64@...> wrote:
            >
            > Can anyone tell me what this Name means??
            > Way-Ge-maw-wa-be
            >






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          • Shawn St.Germaine
            Meegwetch,Iam not sure of the correct spelling I got this name while searching my family tree. It was the name of my gr gr grandfather also known as Mike
            Message 5 of 13 , Mar 2, 2007
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              Meegwetch,Iam not sure of the correct spelling I got this name while
              searching my family tree. It was the name of my gr gr grandfather also
              known as Mike StGermain(e). So it is possible the spelling could be off
              and was written the way it sounds in English.


              --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Qorach ben Dan"
              <cjlippert@...> wrote:
              >
              > Aaniin,
              > Could it be "Wegimaawebi" to mean "Chief-feather"?
              >
              > --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn
              > St.Germaine" <chippewa64@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Can anyone tell me what this Name means??
              > > Way-Ge-maw-wa-be
              > >
              >
            • Scott Coleman
              Kee, what does wabe mean. those 4 all end in it.
              Message 6 of 13 , Mar 2, 2007
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                Kee, what does "wabe" mean. those 4 all end in it.

                On Mar 2, 2007, at 10:26 AM, Kees van Kolmeschate wrote:

                > Aaniin Charlie,
                >
                > I miss the syllable GWAN which normally bears the meaning
                > of "feather", albeit indeed often in the combination "gwanebi"
                > as in "baw om be guon abe" , translation given as "rising feather"
                > and "kay ge she quon abe", translation given as "the fast feather".
                >
                > In general the meaning of -ebi is vague, at least in proper names,
                > ex.:
                > "ah be taw ge shig wabe" (aabita-giizhigwebi) translated as "half sky"
                > "ay se ne waw ge wabe" (esiniiwajiwebi) translated as "rocky mountain"
                > "may sko ge gish wabe" (meshkogiizhigwebi) translated as "red sky"
                > "o ge mah waw ge wabe" (ogimaawajiwebi) translated as "chief of the
                > mountain"
                >
                > Of course there VAI verbs ending in -ebi which adds to the meaning of
                > the preceding part "while sitting"; the "e" of -ebi seems in most (if
                > not all) cases belong to the first part, which causes the short "a"
                > of "abi" (sit) to drop.
                > Ex: "zaagitigwaanebi" one's head is visible while sitting,
                > from "zaagitigwaane" one's head sticks out (with medial -tigwaan-
                > head)
                > "ishkwebi" sit at the end, from root "ishkwe-"
                >
                > It would seem to me that this "e" of these VAI verbs does not apply
                > in the proper names.
                >
                > gr, Kees.
                >
                > --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Qorach ben
                > Dan" <cjlippert@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > Aaniin,
                > > Could it be "Wegimaawebi" to mean "Chief-feather"?
                > >
                > > --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn
                > > St.Germaine" <chippewa64@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Can anyone tell me what this Name means??
                > > > Way-Ge-maw-wa-be
                > > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
              • aim_baby
                In names, is it abe as in male?
                Message 7 of 13 , Mar 3, 2007
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                  In names, is it "abe" as in male?


                  --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Kees van Kolmeschate"
                  <kolmeschate_sr@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Aaniin Charlie,
                  >
                  > I miss the syllable GWAN which normally bears the meaning
                  > of "feather", albeit indeed often in the combination "gwanebi"
                  > as in "baw om be guon abe" , translation given as "rising feather"
                  > and "kay ge she quon abe", translation given as "the fast feather".
                  >
                  > In general the meaning of -ebi is vague, at least in proper names,
                  > ex.:
                  > "ah be taw ge shig wabe" (aabita-giizhigwebi) translated as "half sky"
                  > "ay se ne waw ge wabe" (esiniiwajiwebi) translated as "rocky mountain"
                  > "may sko ge gish wabe" (meshkogiizhigwebi) translated as "red sky"
                  > "o ge mah waw ge wabe" (ogimaawajiwebi) translated as "chief of the
                  > mountain"
                  >
                  > Of course there VAI verbs ending in -ebi which adds to the meaning of
                  > the preceding part "while sitting"; the "e" of -ebi seems in most (if
                  > not all) cases belong to the first part, which causes the short "a"
                  > of "abi" (sit) to drop.
                  > Ex: "zaagitigwaanebi" one's head is visible while sitting,
                  > from "zaagitigwaane" one's head sticks out (with medial -tigwaan-
                  > head)
                  > "ishkwebi" sit at the end, from root "ishkwe-"
                  >
                  > It would seem to me that this "e" of these VAI verbs does not apply
                  > in the proper names.
                  >
                  > gr, Kees.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Qorach ben
                  > Dan" <cjlippert@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Aaniin,
                  > > Could it be "Wegimaawebi" to mean "Chief-feather"?
                  > >
                  > > --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn
                  > > St.Germaine" <chippewa64@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Can anyone tell me what this Name means??
                  > > > Way-Ge-maw-wa-be
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • Shawn St.Germaine
                  We live in Michigan and You? ... email the boot with the All-new Yahoo! Mail
                  Message 8 of 13 , Mar 3, 2007
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                    We live in Michigan and You?


                    --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, April Saint
                    <mountainlionspirit@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Ahneen Shawn
                    >
                    > Where are u from? My last name is St.Germaine too.
                    >
                    > Waabmin
                    >
                    > April St. Germaine
                    > Mountainlionspirit
                    >
                    > Qorach ben Dan <cjlippert@...> wrote:
                    > Aaniin,
                    > Could it be "Wegimaawebi" to mean "Chief-feather"?
                    >
                    > --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn
                    > St.Germaine" <chippewa64@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Can anyone tell me what this Name means??
                    > > Way-Ge-maw-wa-be
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Be smarter than spam. See how smart SpamGuard is at giving junk
                    email the boot with the All-new Yahoo! Mail
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • Qorach ben Dan
                    Aaniin niijii. You re right. /gwanebi/ would be a wing-edge, feather but /ebi/ by itself is not. So, our choices are: * wegimaawebi = leader/chief (lit: sit
                    Message 9 of 13 , Mar 3, 2007
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                      Aaniin niijii.
                      You're right. /gwanebi/ would be a "wing-edge, feather" but /ebi/ by
                      itself is not.

                      So, our choices are:
                      * wegimaawebi = leader/chief (lit: sit as a leader/chief)
                      * wegimaawabi = enthroned/council-seat

                      Any other possibilities?

                      CJL

                      --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Kees van
                      Kolmeschate" <kolmeschate_sr@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Aaniin Charlie,
                      >
                      > I miss the syllable GWAN which normally bears the meaning
                      > of "feather", albeit indeed often in the combination "gwanebi"
                      > as in "baw om be guon abe" , translation given as "rising feather"
                      > and "kay ge she quon abe", translation given as "the fast feather".
                      >
                      > In general the meaning of -ebi is vague, at least in proper names,
                      > ex.: "ah be taw ge shig wabe" (aabita-giizhigwebi) translated
                      > as "half sky", "ay se ne waw ge wabe" (esiniiwajiwebi) translated
                      > as "rocky mountain", "may sko ge gish wabe" (meshkogiizhigwebi)
                      > translated as "red sky", "o ge mah waw ge wabe" (ogimaawajiwebi)
                      > translated as "chief of the mountain"
                      >
                      > Of course there VAI verbs ending in -ebi which adds to the meaning
                      > of the preceding part "while sitting"; the "e" of -ebi seems in
                      > most (if not all) cases belong to the first part, which causes the
                      > short "a" of "abi" (sit) to drop.
                      > Ex: "zaagitigwaanebi" one's head is visible while sitting,
                      > from "zaagitigwaane" one's head sticks out (with medial -tigwaan-
                      > head) "ishkwebi" sit at the end, from root "ishkwe-"
                      >
                      > It would seem to me that this "e" of these VAI verbs does not apply
                      > in the proper names.
                      >
                      > gr, Kees.
                    • Shawn St.Germaine
                      Is it true that the Ojibways from the Soo spellings of words are somewhat different to that of say those from say Minnesota. I know they are very close
                      Message 10 of 13 , Mar 4, 2007
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                        Is it true that the Ojibways from the Soo spellings of words are
                        somewhat different to that of say those from say Minnesota. I know
                        they are very close together?




                        --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Qorach ben
                        Dan" <cjlippert@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Aaniin niijii.
                        > You're right. /gwanebi/ would be a "wing-edge, feather" but /ebi/
                        by
                        > itself is not.
                        >
                        > So, our choices are:
                        > * wegimaawebi = leader/chief (lit: sit as a leader/chief)
                        > * wegimaawabi = enthroned/council-seat
                        >
                        > Any other possibilities?
                        >
                        > CJL
                        >
                        > --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Kees van
                        > Kolmeschate" <kolmeschate_sr@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Aaniin Charlie,
                        > >
                        > > I miss the syllable GWAN which normally bears the meaning
                        > > of "feather", albeit indeed often in the combination "gwanebi"
                        > > as in "baw om be guon abe" , translation given as "rising feather"
                        > > and "kay ge she quon abe", translation given as "the fast
                        feather".
                        > >
                        > > In general the meaning of -ebi is vague, at least in proper
                        names,
                        > > ex.: "ah be taw ge shig wabe" (aabita-giizhigwebi) translated
                        > > as "half sky", "ay se ne waw ge wabe" (esiniiwajiwebi) translated
                        > > as "rocky mountain", "may sko ge gish wabe" (meshkogiizhigwebi)
                        > > translated as "red sky", "o ge mah waw ge wabe" (ogimaawajiwebi)
                        > > translated as "chief of the mountain"
                        > >
                        > > Of course there VAI verbs ending in -ebi which adds to the
                        meaning
                        > > of the preceding part "while sitting"; the "e" of -ebi seems in
                        > > most (if not all) cases belong to the first part, which causes
                        the
                        > > short "a" of "abi" (sit) to drop.
                        > > Ex: "zaagitigwaanebi" one's head is visible while sitting,
                        > > from "zaagitigwaane" one's head sticks out (with medial -tigwaan-
                        > > head) "ishkwebi" sit at the end, from root "ishkwe-"
                        > >
                        > > It would seem to me that this "e" of these VAI verbs does not
                        apply
                        > > in the proper names.
                        > >
                        > > gr, Kees.
                        >
                      • Mashkaawiziibines
                        ... by ... feather ... feather . ... names, ... translated ... meaning ... the ... apply ... because they re extremely special. Not all names will be
                        Message 11 of 13 , Mar 4, 2007
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                          --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Qorach ben
                          Dan" <cjlippert@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Aaniin niijii.
                          > You're right. /gwanebi/ would be a "wing-edge, feather" but /ebi/
                          by
                          > itself is not.
                          >
                          > So, our choices are:
                          > * wegimaawebi = leader/chief (lit: sit as a leader/chief)
                          > * wegimaawabi = enthroned/council-seat
                          >
                          > Any other possibilities?
                          >
                          > CJL
                          >
                          > --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Kees van
                          > Kolmeschate" <kolmeschate_sr@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Aaniin Charlie,
                          > >
                          > > I miss the syllable GWAN which normally bears the meaning
                          > > of "feather", albeit indeed often in the combination "gwanebi"
                          > > as in "baw om be guon abe" , translation given as "rising
                          feather"
                          > > and "kay ge she quon abe", translation given as "the fast
                          feather".
                          > >
                          > > In general the meaning of -ebi is vague, at least in proper
                          names,
                          > > ex.: "ah be taw ge shig wabe" (aabita-giizhigwebi) translated
                          > > as "half sky", "ay se ne waw ge wabe" (esiniiwajiwebi)
                          translated
                          > > as "rocky mountain", "may sko ge gish wabe" (meshkogiizhigwebi)
                          > > translated as "red sky", "o ge mah waw ge wabe" (ogimaawajiwebi)
                          > > translated as "chief of the mountain"
                          > >
                          > > Of course there VAI verbs ending in -ebi which adds to the
                          meaning
                          > > of the preceding part "while sitting"; the "e" of -ebi seems in
                          > > most (if not all) cases belong to the first part, which causes
                          the
                          > > short "a" of "abi" (sit) to drop.
                          > > Ex: "zaagitigwaanebi" one's head is visible while sitting,
                          > > from "zaagitigwaane" one's head sticks out (with medial -tigwaan-

                          > > head) "ishkwebi" sit at the end, from root "ishkwe-"
                          > >
                          > > It would seem to me that this "e" of these VAI verbs does not
                          apply
                          > > in the proper names.
                          > >
                          > > gr, Kees.
                          >I'm only offering an opinion here but. Names are the way they are
                          because they're extremely special. Not all names will be translated
                          from a book. Manytimes one letter can change the whole meaning.
                          If ever I were to here a name like that. I would have translated
                          chief whos voise is heard in the water... I hope this helps I may
                          also be way off... Only your we'eh knows the true dream and
                          meaning that came with that name
                        • Kees van Kolmeschate
                          Please do not get confused by the different styles of spelling Anishinaabemowin. In general Charlie, Weshki and many teachers and researchers, use Fiero,
                          Message 12 of 13 , Mar 5, 2007
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                            Please do not get confused by the different styles of spelling
                            Anishinaabemowin. In general Charlie, Weshki' and many teachers and
                            researchers, use Fiero, a.k.a. double vowel, spelling of
                            Anishinaabemowin, designed around 1950.
                            The names that are shown written in separated syllables (now between
                            <<..>>)are in their original spelling in documents 90-170 years old,
                            and written informally as if they were English words.
                            So <<wabe>> represents what is now written in Fiero spelling "webi"
                            or "webii".
                            The "w" in the examples given actually belongs to the preceding part
                            of the word,
                            viz. "wajiw(an)" 'mountain(s)' and "giizhig(oon)" 'sky/skies', 'heaven
                            (s)' the underlying stem for sky is /giizhigw-/.

                            I do not think, as someone else supposed, that this "-ebi" (<<(w)
                            abe>>)has anything to do with "-aabe" 'male' as in
                            "ayaabe" 'male of quadruped animal',
                            "anishinaabe", 'man',
                            "misaabe", 'giant',
                            "ninaabem" 'my husband'.

                            gr, Kees.





                            --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, Scott Coleman
                            <scott@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Kee, what does "wabe" mean. those 4 all end in it.
                            >
                            > On Mar 2, 2007, at 10:26 AM, Kees van Kolmeschate wrote:
                            >
                            > > Aaniin Charlie,
                            > >
                            > > I miss the syllable GWAN which normally bears the meaning
                            > > of "feather", albeit indeed often in the combination "gwanebi"
                            > > as in <<baw om be guon abe>> , translation given as "rising
                            feather"
                            > > and <<kay ge she quon abe>>, translation given as "the fast
                            feather".
                            > >
                            > > In general the meaning of -ebi is vague, at least in proper names,
                            > > ex.:
                            > > <<ah be taw ge shig wabe>> (aabita-giizhigwebi) translated
                            as "half sky"
                            > > <<ay se ne waw ge wabe>> (esiniiwajiwebi) translated as "rocky
                            mountain"
                            > > <<may sko ge gish wabe>> (meshkogiizhigwebi) translated as "red
                            sky"
                            > > <<o ge mah waw ge wabe>> (ogimaawajiwebi) translated as "chief of
                            the
                            > > mountain"
                            > >
                          • April Saint
                            I live in on the Rama Mnjikaning First Nation in Rama Ontario Canada. My husbands family broke off and some went to Michigan. Our famlies are probably kin.
                            Message 13 of 13 , Mar 5, 2007
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                              I live in on the Rama Mnjikaning First Nation in Rama Ontario Canada. My husbands family broke off and some went to Michigan. Our famlies are probably kin. My husbands grandpa's name was Barney St. Germain (e). Its spelled either way. Barney had a brother named Oscar and several other siblings. See if that rings any bell with your family.

                              April

                              "Shawn St.Germaine" <chippewa64@...> wrote:
                              We live in Michigan and You?

                              --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, April Saint
                              <mountainlionspirit@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Ahneen Shawn
                              >
                              > Where are u from? My last name is St.Germaine too.
                              >
                              > Waabmin
                              >
                              > April St. Germaine
                              > Mountainlionspirit
                              >
                              > Qorach ben Dan <cjlippert@...> wrote:
                              > Aaniin,
                              > Could it be "Wegimaawebi" to mean "Chief-feather"?
                              >
                              > --- In ojibwelanguagesocietymiinawaa@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn
                              > St.Germaine" <chippewa64@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Can anyone tell me what this Name means??
                              > > Way-Ge-maw-wa-be
                              > >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > ---------------------------------
                              > Be smarter than spam. See how smart SpamGuard is at giving junk
                              email the boot with the All-new Yahoo! Mail
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >






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