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Lathe

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  • Aaron Ramsey
    Howdy, I ve been kicking around the idea of picking up a lathe for a while now to make small parts for my robots (and possible other things). Its gotten to the
    Message 1 of 27 , Sep 1 3:50 AM
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      Howdy,

      I've been kicking around the idea of picking up a lathe for a while now
      to make small parts for my robots (and possible other things). Its
      gotten to the point where it is a bit of a pain in the *ss not actually
      having it. I don't neeeeed it, but I really want it. ;-)

      I've narrowed my choices down to the following:

      Taig Microlathe : http://www.taigtools.com/mlathe.html
      Sherline 4000 : http://www.sherline.com/4000pg.htm
      Grizzly G8688 7x12 :
      http://www.grizzly.com/products/7-x-12-Mini-Metal-Lathe/G8688
      Harborfreight mini 7x10 :
      http://www.harborfreight.com/7-inch-x-10-inch-precision-mini-lathe-93212.html
      BusyBee 7x8 :
      http://www.busybeetools.com/products/LATHE-METAL-CUTTING-MINI-METRIC-7IN.-X-8IN..html

      I figure that there must be someone out there on the list with some
      experience with these smaller lathes.

      I like the Taig because the quality of my Taig mill is really nice and I
      can get the Taig in town at Lee Valley. The Sherline basically matches
      the Taig in capabilities but had an endless supply of goodies and
      add-ons from Sherline... plus can be gotten from Solarbotics.

      The Busybee appears to be the same machine as the Harborfreight but with
      a smaller motor for some reason. From what I've read, the 7x10 lathes
      are actually overstating their bed length and 7x8 is actually the real
      length. I don't need a long bed so that doesn't really matter, but I
      can't figure out why BusyBee would downrate the motor. The BusyBee is
      available in town, so that's a plus. The harborfreight could be shipped,
      or I could drive down to Syracuse to pick it up.

      The Grizzly looks like a nice machine and comes with a bunch of extras
      that the others don't. The only way to get it is to ship it though,
      which means dealing with UPS. I'm actually leaning towards this one in
      spite of the shipping hassles. Its easy to get replacement parts from
      Grizzly, has the highest capacity of them all and has pretty decent reviews.

      Anyone done any work with a microlathe?

      Aaron
    • pic1832
      Hi Aaron, I bought a 7X10 from MicroMark in USA about 6 years ago (with all the options available). I converted it to CNC right away cause I am not a machinist
      Message 2 of 27 , Sep 1 5:27 AM
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        Hi Aaron,

        I bought a 7X10 from MicroMark in USA about 6 years ago (with all the options available). I converted it to CNC right away cause I am not a machinist and a very impatient perfectionist.
        They have a new one now;
        http://www.micromark.com/MICROLUX-7x14-MINI-LATHE,8176.html

        This one is longer and looks nicer with the silver paint job instead of the ugly red I have.
        The reasons why I chose this one, that I can think of right now;

        The digital spindle speed indicator, metal gears at the output stage, heavy cast Iron bed and oh yeh, they shipped to Canada.

        Grizzly, harbor freights and micromark machines are made by the same company in China so the quality is the same. If you tune it right, you might be able to get +/- 0.001" if you creep up to the final dimension and do about 4 to 10 passes at the end (depending on tool deflection and the length of the part).

        I don't know about the busy bee or the taig stuff. I had a sherline mill and didn't like it because it was too flimsy. I had to make real light cuts (0.010" max) on 6061T6 Alum. I sold it and bought the MicroMark mini Mill and converted that one to CNC as well.
        The most important selection criteria should be the stiffness of the machine. The heavier the Cast Iron bed, the more stable it will be when cutting and the heavier the cut can be.
        If I had to buy them over again, I'd pick the same setup.
        Then again, in 6 years, the quality could've gone up or down...
        good luck


        Mark


        --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Ramsey <aaronsmaillistaccount@...> wrote:
        >
        > Howdy,
        >
        > I've been kicking around the idea of picking up a lathe for a while now
        > to make small parts for my robots (and possible other things). Its
        > gotten to the point where it is a bit of a pain in the *ss not actually
        > having it. I don't neeeeed it, but I really want it. ;-)
        >
        > I've narrowed my choices down to the following:
        >
        > Taig Microlathe : http://www.taigtools.com/mlathe.html
        > Sherline 4000 : http://www.sherline.com/4000pg.htm
        > Grizzly G8688 7x12 :
        > http://www.grizzly.com/products/7-x-12-Mini-Metal-Lathe/G8688
        > Harborfreight mini 7x10 :
        > http://www.harborfreight.com/7-inch-x-10-inch-precision-mini-lathe-93212.html
        > BusyBee 7x8 :
        > http://www.busybeetools.com/products/LATHE-METAL-CUTTING-MINI-METRIC-7IN.-X-8IN..html
        >
        > I figure that there must be someone out there on the list with some
        > experience with these smaller lathes.
        >
        > I like the Taig because the quality of my Taig mill is really nice and I
        > can get the Taig in town at Lee Valley. The Sherline basically matches
        > the Taig in capabilities but had an endless supply of goodies and
        > add-ons from Sherline... plus can be gotten from Solarbotics.
        >
        > The Busybee appears to be the same machine as the Harborfreight but with
        > a smaller motor for some reason. From what I've read, the 7x10 lathes
        > are actually overstating their bed length and 7x8 is actually the real
        > length. I don't need a long bed so that doesn't really matter, but I
        > can't figure out why BusyBee would downrate the motor. The BusyBee is
        > available in town, so that's a plus. The harborfreight could be shipped,
        > or I could drive down to Syracuse to pick it up.
        >
        > The Grizzly looks like a nice machine and comes with a bunch of extras
        > that the others don't. The only way to get it is to ship it though,
        > which means dealing with UPS. I'm actually leaning towards this one in
        > spite of the shipping hassles. Its easy to get replacement parts from
        > Grizzly, has the highest capacity of them all and has pretty decent reviews.
        >
        > Anyone done any work with a microlathe?
        >
        > Aaron
        >
      • Aaron
        The Microlux 7x14 looks pretty good. Out of stock though. 8( The spindle speed indicator seems like a nice feature to have. How hard was the CNC conversion on
        Message 3 of 27 , Sep 1 6:14 AM
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          The Microlux 7x14 looks pretty good. Out of stock though. 8( The spindle speed indicator seems like a nice feature to have.

          How hard was the CNC conversion on your machine? Interested in doing a show-and-tell with me one day? I'll supply the beer. <grin>

          Aaron


          --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, "pic1832" <pic1832@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Aaron,
          >
          > I bought a 7X10 from MicroMark in USA about 6 years ago (with all the options available). I converted it to CNC right away cause I am not a machinist and a very impatient perfectionist.
          > They have a new one now;
          > http://www.micromark.com/MICROLUX-7x14-MINI-LATHE,8176.html
          >
          > This one is longer and looks nicer with the silver paint job instead of the ugly red I have.
          > The reasons why I chose this one, that I can think of right now;
          >
          > The digital spindle speed indicator, metal gears at the output stage, heavy cast Iron bed and oh yeh, they shipped to Canada.
          >
          > Grizzly, harbor freights and micromark machines are made by the same company in China so the quality is the same. If you tune it right, you might be able to get +/- 0.001" if you creep up to the final dimension and do about 4 to 10 passes at the end (depending on tool deflection and the length of the part).
          >
          > I don't know about the busy bee or the taig stuff. I had a sherline mill and didn't like it because it was too flimsy. I had to make real light cuts (0.010" max) on 6061T6 Alum. I sold it and bought the MicroMark mini Mill and converted that one to CNC as well.
          > The most important selection criteria should be the stiffness of the machine. The heavier the Cast Iron bed, the more stable it will be when cutting and the heavier the cut can be.
          > If I had to buy them over again, I'd pick the same setup.
          > Then again, in 6 years, the quality could've gone up or down...
          > good luck
          >
          >
          > Mark
          >
          >
          > --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Ramsey <aaronsmaillistaccount@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Howdy,
          > >
          > > I've been kicking around the idea of picking up a lathe for a while now
          > > to make small parts for my robots (and possible other things). Its
          > > gotten to the point where it is a bit of a pain in the *ss not actually
          > > having it. I don't neeeeed it, but I really want it. ;-)
          > >
          > > I've narrowed my choices down to the following:
          > >
          > > Taig Microlathe : http://www.taigtools.com/mlathe.html
          > > Sherline 4000 : http://www.sherline.com/4000pg.htm
          > > Grizzly G8688 7x12 :
          > > http://www.grizzly.com/products/7-x-12-Mini-Metal-Lathe/G8688
          > > Harborfreight mini 7x10 :
          > > http://www.harborfreight.com/7-inch-x-10-inch-precision-mini-lathe-93212.html
          > > BusyBee 7x8 :
          > > http://www.busybeetools.com/products/LATHE-METAL-CUTTING-MINI-METRIC-7IN.-X-8IN..html
          > >
          > > I figure that there must be someone out there on the list with some
          > > experience with these smaller lathes.
          > >
          > > I like the Taig because the quality of my Taig mill is really nice and I
          > > can get the Taig in town at Lee Valley. The Sherline basically matches
          > > the Taig in capabilities but had an endless supply of goodies and
          > > add-ons from Sherline... plus can be gotten from Solarbotics.
          > >
          > > The Busybee appears to be the same machine as the Harborfreight but with
          > > a smaller motor for some reason. From what I've read, the 7x10 lathes
          > > are actually overstating their bed length and 7x8 is actually the real
          > > length. I don't need a long bed so that doesn't really matter, but I
          > > can't figure out why BusyBee would downrate the motor. The BusyBee is
          > > available in town, so that's a plus. The harborfreight could be shipped,
          > > or I could drive down to Syracuse to pick it up.
          > >
          > > The Grizzly looks like a nice machine and comes with a bunch of extras
          > > that the others don't. The only way to get it is to ship it though,
          > > which means dealing with UPS. I'm actually leaning towards this one in
          > > spite of the shipping hassles. Its easy to get replacement parts from
          > > Grizzly, has the highest capacity of them all and has pretty decent reviews.
          > >
          > > Anyone done any work with a microlathe?
          > >
          > > Aaron
          > >
          >
        • krazatchu Grant
          I ve also been keeping my eyes open for a lathe to CNC... As I found with my CNC mill (SX3), there are alot of things I want to use it for that are just a bit
          Message 4 of 27 , Sep 1 6:39 AM
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            I've also been keeping my eyes open for a lathe to CNC...
            As I found with my CNC mill (SX3), there are alot of things I want to use it for that are just a bit too big...

            If you have the space, consider a 9x20 or larger....
            As well as the size limit, micro-lathes are limited in power and rigidity...
            I have heard it's easy to exceed the cutting capacity well before the size limit on small machines...

            With a CNC conversion, you don't want alot of options like powered cross feed, etc...
            It's nice to have a backlash free(timing belt) drive system as well, for indexing the spindle and live tooling...
            If I could find a decent headstock for cheap I'd consider casting the bed from epoxy-granite and using rails for the linear...

            My 2 cents,
            Michael


            To: ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com
            From: aaronsmaillistaccount@...
            Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 13:14:44 +0000
            Subject: [ORE_bits] Re: Lathe

             
            The Microlux 7x14 looks pretty good. Out of stock though. 8( The spindle speed indicator seems like a nice feature to have.

            How hard was the CNC conversion on your machine? Interested in doing a show-and-tell with me one day? I'll supply the beer. <grin>

            Aaron

            --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, "pic1832" <pic1832@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Aaron,
            >
            > I bought a 7X10 from MicroMark in USA about 6 years ago (with all the options available). I converted it to CNC right away cause I am not a machinist and a very impatient perfectionist.
            > They have a new one now;
            > http://www.micromark.com/MICROLUX-7x14-MINI-LATHE,8176.html
            >
            > This one is longer and looks nicer with the silver paint job instead of the ugly red I have.
            > The reasons why I chose this one, that I can think of right now;
            >
            > The digital spindle speed indicator, metal gears at the output stage, heavy cast Iron bed and oh yeh, they shipped to Canada.
            >
            > Grizzly, harbor freights and micromark machines are made by the same company in China so the quality is the same. If you tune it right, you might be able to get +/- 0.001" if you creep up to the final dimension and do about 4 to 10 passes at the end (depending on tool deflection and the length of the part).
            >
            > I don't know about the busy bee or the taig stuff. I had a sherline mill and didn't like it because it was too flimsy. I had to make real light cuts (0.010" max) on 6061T6 Alum. I sold it and bought the MicroMark mini Mill and converted that one to CNC as well.
            > The most important selection criteria should be the stiffness of the machine. The heavier the Cast Iron bed, the more stable it will be when cutting and the heavier the cut can be.
            > If I had to buy them over again, I'd pick the same setup.
            > Then again, in 6 years, the quality could've gone up or down...
            > good luck
            >
            >
            > Mark
            >
            >
            > --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Ramsey <aaronsmaillistaccount@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Howdy,
            > >
            > > I've been kicking around the idea of picking up a lathe for a while now
            > > to make small parts for my robots (and possible other things). Its
            > > gotten to the point where it is a bit of a pain in the *ss not actually
            > > having it. I don't neeeeed it, but I really want it. ;-)
            > >
            > > I've narrowed my choices down to the following:
            > >
            > > Taig Microlathe : http://www.taigtools.com/mlathe.html
            > > Sherline 4000 : http://www.sherline.com/4000pg.htm
            > > Grizzly G8688 7x12 :
            > > http://www.grizzly.com/products/7-x-12-Mini-Metal-Lathe/G8688
            > > Harborfreight mini 7x10 :
            > > http://www.harborfreight.com/7-inch-x-10-inch-precision-mini-lathe-93212.html
            > > BusyBee 7x8 :
            > > http://www.busybeetools.com/products/LATHE-METAL-CUTTING-MINI-METRIC-7IN.-X-8IN..html
            > >
            > > I figure that there must be someone out there on the list with some
            > > experience with these smaller lathes.
            > >
            > > I like the Taig because the quality of my Taig mill is really nice and I
            > > can get the Taig in town at Lee Valley. The Sherline basically matches
            > > the Taig in capabilities but had an endless supply of goodies and
            > > add-ons from Sherline... plus can be gotten from Solarbotics.
            > >
            > > The Busybee appears to be the same machine as the Harborfreight but with
            > > a smaller motor for some reason. From what I've read, the 7x10 lathes
            > > are actually overstating their bed length and 7x8 is actually the real
            > > length. I don't need a long bed so that doesn't really matter, but I
            > > can't figure out why BusyBee would downrate the motor. The BusyBee is
            > > available in town, so that's a plus. The harborfreight could be shipped,
            > > or I could drive down to Syracuse to pick it up.
            > >
            > > The Grizzly looks like a nice machine and comes with a bunch of extras
            > > that the others don't. The only way to get it is to ship it though,
            > > which means dealing with UPS. I'm actually leaning towards this one in
            > > spite of the shipping hassles. Its easy to get replacement parts from
            > > Grizzly, has the highest capacity of them all and has pretty decent reviews.
            > >
            > > Anyone done any work with a microlathe?
            > >
            > > Aaron
            > >
            >


          • Darcy Whyte
            I want a lathe some day too. I don t actually know how to use one. I vaguely remember doing stuff with a lathe in 2nd or 3rd year physics. It was part of a
            Message 5 of 27 , Sep 1 6:47 AM
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              I want a lathe some day too. I don't actually know how to use one. I vaguely remember doing stuff with a lathe in 2nd or 3rd year physics. It was part of a course but I think I completed the project in one or two afternoons so that wasn't long enough to count. 

              My reflex would to just get that Taig since it's like 500.00  (their largest kit). Just because it's cheaper and it would get me started. It will need to wait till I have some stronger need for it though. At that point, I'd reassess what to get (based on actual need). 


              On Wed, Sep 1, 2010 at 9:39 AM, krazatchu Grant <krazatchu@...> wrote:
               

              I've also been keeping my eyes open for a lathe to CNC...
              As I found with my CNC mill (SX3), there are alot of things I want to use it for that are just a bit too big...

              If you have the space, consider a 9x20 or larger....
              As well as the size limit, micro-lathes are limited in power and rigidity...
              I have heard it's easy to exceed the cutting capacity well before the size limit on small machines...

              With a CNC conversion, you don't want alot of options like powered cross feed, etc...
              It's nice to have a backlash free(timing belt) drive system as well, for indexing the spindle and live tooling...
              If I could find a decent headstock for cheap I'd consider casting the bed from epoxy-granite and using rails for the linear...

              My 2 cents,
              Michael


              To: ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com
              From: aaronsmaillistaccount@...
              Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 13:14:44 +0000
              Subject: [ORE_bits] Re: Lathe


               
              The Microlux 7x14 looks pretty good. Out of stock though. 8( The spindle speed indicator seems like a nice feature to have.

              How hard was the CNC conversion on your machine? Interested in doing a show-and-tell with me one day? I'll supply the beer. <grin>

              Aaron

              --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, "pic1832" <pic1832@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Aaron,
              >
              > I bought a 7X10 from MicroMark in USA about 6 years ago (with all the options available). I converted it to CNC right away cause I am not a machinist and a very impatient perfectionist.
              > They have a new one now;
              > http://www.micromark.com/MICROLUX-7x14-MINI-LATHE,8176.html
              >
              > This one is longer and looks nicer with the silver paint job instead of the ugly red I have.
              > The reasons why I chose this one, that I can think of right now;
              >
              > The digital spindle speed indicator, metal gears at the output stage, heavy cast Iron bed and oh yeh, they shipped to Canada.
              >
              > Grizzly, harbor freights and micromark machines are made by the same company in China so the quality is the same. If you tune it right, you might be able to get +/- 0.001" if you creep up to the final dimension and do about 4 to 10 passes at the end (depending on tool deflection and the length of the part).
              >
              > I don't know about the busy bee or the taig stuff. I had a sherline mill and didn't like it because it was too flimsy. I had to make real light cuts (0.010" max) on 6061T6 Alum. I sold it and bought the MicroMark mini Mill and converted that one to CNC as well.
              > The most important selection criteria should be the stiffness of the machine. The heavier the Cast Iron bed, the more stable it will be when cutting and the heavier the cut can be.
              > If I had to buy them over again, I'd pick the same setup.
              > Then again, in 6 years, the quality could've gone up or down...
              > good luck
              >
              >
              > Mark
              >
              >
              > --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Ramsey <aaronsmaillistaccount@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Howdy,
              > >
              > > I've been kicking around the idea of picking up a lathe for a while now
              > > to make small parts for my robots (and possible other things). Its
              > > gotten to the point where it is a bit of a pain in the *ss not actually
              > > having it. I don't neeeeed it, but I really want it. ;-)
              > >
              > > I've narrowed my choices down to the following:
              > >
              > > Taig Microlathe : http://www.taigtools.com/mlathe.html
              > > Sherline 4000 : http://www.sherline.com/4000pg.htm
              > > Grizzly G8688 7x12 :
              > > http://www.grizzly.com/products/7-x-12-Mini-Metal-Lathe/G8688
              > > Harborfreight mini 7x10 :
              > > http://www.harborfreight.com/7-inch-x-10-inch-precision-mini-lathe-93212.html
              > > BusyBee 7x8 :
              > > http://www.busybeetools.com/products/LATHE-METAL-CUTTING-MINI-METRIC-7IN.-X-8IN..html
              > >
              > > I figure that there must be someone out there on the list with some
              > > experience with these smaller lathes.
              > >
              > > I like the Taig because the quality of my Taig mill is really nice and I
              > > can get the Taig in town at Lee Valley. The Sherline basically matches
              > > the Taig in capabilities but had an endless supply of goodies and
              > > add-ons from Sherline... plus can be gotten from Solarbotics.
              > >
              > > The Busybee appears to be the same machine as the Harborfreight but with
              > > a smaller motor for some reason. From what I've read, the 7x10 lathes
              > > are actually overstating their bed length and 7x8 is actually the real
              > > length. I don't need a long bed so that doesn't really matter, but I
              > > can't figure out why BusyBee would downrate the motor. The BusyBee is
              > > available in town, so that's a plus. The harborfreight could be shipped,
              > > or I could drive down to Syracuse to pick it up.
              > >
              > > The Grizzly looks like a nice machine and comes with a bunch of extras
              > > that the others don't. The only way to get it is to ship it though,
              > > which means dealing with UPS. I'm actually leaning towards this one in
              > > spite of the shipping hassles. Its easy to get replacement parts from
              > > Grizzly, has the highest capacity of them all and has pretty decent reviews.
              > >
              > > Anyone done any work with a microlathe?
              > >
              > > Aaron
              > >
              >



            • pic1832
              The conversion was a snap. I bartered with the guy (Ron Steele), who made the conversion kits. His kits (lathe and mill, plus belt drive conversion) for 2 of
              Message 6 of 27 , Sep 1 7:39 AM
              • 0 Attachment
                The conversion was a snap. I bartered with the guy (Ron Steele), who made the conversion kits. His kits (lathe and mill, plus belt drive conversion) for 2 of my 4-axis CNC controllers I was selling at the time.
                see his site
                http://www.stirlingsteele.com/Index.html

                Also check out http://www.littlemachineshop.com, I'll bet you'll buy something from them if you are working with these lathes and mills!

                I bought a lot of stuff from them. excellent service and cheapest around at the time.
                You can build the conversion kit parts yourself by getting the plans, but you better be good at machining.

                I seem to remember, people who bought taigs, were frugal and good in making their own accessories. I never saw one that was CNC converted though.

                I'll take some close-up pictures this weekend and post them if you guys want.

                Mark

                --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, "Aaron" <aaronsmaillistaccount@...> wrote:
                >
                > The Microlux 7x14 looks pretty good. Out of stock though. 8( The spindle speed indicator seems like a nice feature to have.
                >
                > How hard was the CNC conversion on your machine? Interested in doing a show-and-tell with me one day? I'll supply the beer. <grin>
                >
                > Aaron
                >
                >
                > --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, "pic1832" <pic1832@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Hi Aaron,
                > >
                > > I bought a 7X10 from MicroMark in USA about 6 years ago (with all the options available). I converted it to CNC right away cause I am not a machinist and a very impatient perfectionist.
                > > They have a new one now;
                > > http://www.micromark.com/MICROLUX-7x14-MINI-LATHE,8176.html
                > >
                > > This one is longer and looks nicer with the silver paint job instead of the ugly red I have.
                > > The reasons why I chose this one, that I can think of right now;
                > >
                > > The digital spindle speed indicator, metal gears at the output stage, heavy cast Iron bed and oh yeh, they shipped to Canada.
                > >
                > > Grizzly, harbor freights and micromark machines are made by the same company in China so the quality is the same. If you tune it right, you might be able to get +/- 0.001" if you creep up to the final dimension and do about 4 to 10 passes at the end (depending on tool deflection and the length of the part).
                > >
                > > I don't know about the busy bee or the taig stuff. I had a sherline mill and didn't like it because it was too flimsy. I had to make real light cuts (0.010" max) on 6061T6 Alum. I sold it and bought the MicroMark mini Mill and converted that one to CNC as well.
                > > The most important selection criteria should be the stiffness of the machine. The heavier the Cast Iron bed, the more stable it will be when cutting and the heavier the cut can be.
                > > If I had to buy them over again, I'd pick the same setup.
                > > Then again, in 6 years, the quality could've gone up or down...
                > > good luck
                > >
                > >
                > > Mark
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Ramsey <aaronsmaillistaccount@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Howdy,
                > > >
                > > > I've been kicking around the idea of picking up a lathe for a while now
                > > > to make small parts for my robots (and possible other things). Its
                > > > gotten to the point where it is a bit of a pain in the *ss not actually
                > > > having it. I don't neeeeed it, but I really want it. ;-)
                > > >
                > > > I've narrowed my choices down to the following:
                > > >
                > > > Taig Microlathe : http://www.taigtools.com/mlathe.html
                > > > Sherline 4000 : http://www.sherline.com/4000pg.htm
                > > > Grizzly G8688 7x12 :
                > > > http://www.grizzly.com/products/7-x-12-Mini-Metal-Lathe/G8688
                > > > Harborfreight mini 7x10 :
                > > > http://www.harborfreight.com/7-inch-x-10-inch-precision-mini-lathe-93212.html
                > > > BusyBee 7x8 :
                > > > http://www.busybeetools.com/products/LATHE-METAL-CUTTING-MINI-METRIC-7IN.-X-8IN..html
                > > >
                > > > I figure that there must be someone out there on the list with some
                > > > experience with these smaller lathes.
                > > >
                > > > I like the Taig because the quality of my Taig mill is really nice and I
                > > > can get the Taig in town at Lee Valley. The Sherline basically matches
                > > > the Taig in capabilities but had an endless supply of goodies and
                > > > add-ons from Sherline... plus can be gotten from Solarbotics.
                > > >
                > > > The Busybee appears to be the same machine as the Harborfreight but with
                > > > a smaller motor for some reason. From what I've read, the 7x10 lathes
                > > > are actually overstating their bed length and 7x8 is actually the real
                > > > length. I don't need a long bed so that doesn't really matter, but I
                > > > can't figure out why BusyBee would downrate the motor. The BusyBee is
                > > > available in town, so that's a plus. The harborfreight could be shipped,
                > > > or I could drive down to Syracuse to pick it up.
                > > >
                > > > The Grizzly looks like a nice machine and comes with a bunch of extras
                > > > that the others don't. The only way to get it is to ship it though,
                > > > which means dealing with UPS. I'm actually leaning towards this one in
                > > > spite of the shipping hassles. Its easy to get replacement parts from
                > > > Grizzly, has the highest capacity of them all and has pretty decent reviews.
                > > >
                > > > Anyone done any work with a microlathe?
                > > >
                > > > Aaron
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • Aaron
                Dang, both the Grizzly and Microlux machines are backordered. Which ever one comes available first will be making its way to my shop I guess. Grizzly is
                Message 7 of 27 , Sep 1 1:00 PM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Dang, both the Grizzly and Microlux machines are backordered. Which ever one comes available first will be making its way to my shop I guess. Grizzly is telling me that the G8688 should be available the week of the 14th. MicroMark won't give me a date but I've got an email alert set up for when it finally shows up. <grin>

                  Aaron


                  --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, "pic1832" <pic1832@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Aaron,
                  >
                  > I bought a 7X10 from MicroMark in USA about 6 years ago (with all the options available). I converted it to CNC right away cause I am not a machinist and a very impatient perfectionist.
                  > They have a new one now;
                  > http://www.micromark.com/MICROLUX-7x14-MINI-LATHE,8176.html
                  >
                  > This one is longer and looks nicer with the silver paint job instead of the ugly red I have.
                  > The reasons why I chose this one, that I can think of right now;
                  >
                  > The digital spindle speed indicator, metal gears at the output stage, heavy cast Iron bed and oh yeh, they shipped to Canada.
                  >
                  > Grizzly, harbor freights and micromark machines are made by the same company in China so the quality is the same. If you tune it right, you might be able to get +/- 0.001" if you creep up to the final dimension and do about 4 to 10 passes at the end (depending on tool deflection and the length of the part).
                  >
                  > I don't know about the busy bee or the taig stuff. I had a sherline mill and didn't like it because it was too flimsy. I had to make real light cuts (0.010" max) on 6061T6 Alum. I sold it and bought the MicroMark mini Mill and converted that one to CNC as well.
                  > The most important selection criteria should be the stiffness of the machine. The heavier the Cast Iron bed, the more stable it will be when cutting and the heavier the cut can be.
                  > If I had to buy them over again, I'd pick the same setup.
                  > Then again, in 6 years, the quality could've gone up or down...
                  > good luck
                  >
                  >
                  > Mark
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Ramsey <aaronsmaillistaccount@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Howdy,
                  > >
                  > > I've been kicking around the idea of picking up a lathe for a while now
                  > > to make small parts for my robots (and possible other things). Its
                  > > gotten to the point where it is a bit of a pain in the *ss not actually
                  > > having it. I don't neeeeed it, but I really want it. ;-)
                  > >
                  > > I've narrowed my choices down to the following:
                  > >
                  > > Taig Microlathe : http://www.taigtools.com/mlathe.html
                  > > Sherline 4000 : http://www.sherline.com/4000pg.htm
                  > > Grizzly G8688 7x12 :
                  > > http://www.grizzly.com/products/7-x-12-Mini-Metal-Lathe/G8688
                  > > Harborfreight mini 7x10 :
                  > > http://www.harborfreight.com/7-inch-x-10-inch-precision-mini-lathe-93212.html
                  > > BusyBee 7x8 :
                  > > http://www.busybeetools.com/products/LATHE-METAL-CUTTING-MINI-METRIC-7IN.-X-8IN..html
                  > >
                  > > I figure that there must be someone out there on the list with some
                  > > experience with these smaller lathes.
                  > >
                  > > I like the Taig because the quality of my Taig mill is really nice and I
                  > > can get the Taig in town at Lee Valley. The Sherline basically matches
                  > > the Taig in capabilities but had an endless supply of goodies and
                  > > add-ons from Sherline... plus can be gotten from Solarbotics.
                  > >
                  > > The Busybee appears to be the same machine as the Harborfreight but with
                  > > a smaller motor for some reason. From what I've read, the 7x10 lathes
                  > > are actually overstating their bed length and 7x8 is actually the real
                  > > length. I don't need a long bed so that doesn't really matter, but I
                  > > can't figure out why BusyBee would downrate the motor. The BusyBee is
                  > > available in town, so that's a plus. The harborfreight could be shipped,
                  > > or I could drive down to Syracuse to pick it up.
                  > >
                  > > The Grizzly looks like a nice machine and comes with a bunch of extras
                  > > that the others don't. The only way to get it is to ship it though,
                  > > which means dealing with UPS. I'm actually leaning towards this one in
                  > > spite of the shipping hassles. Its easy to get replacement parts from
                  > > Grizzly, has the highest capacity of them all and has pretty decent reviews.
                  > >
                  > > Anyone done any work with a microlathe?
                  > >
                  > > Aaron
                  > >
                  >
                • Aaron
                  ... I looked at them, but the size and $$$ makes them a non-starter for me at this point. One thing I like about the mini lathes is that I can pack them down
                  Message 8 of 27 , Sep 1 1:05 PM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, krazatchu Grant <krazatchu@...> wrote:

                    > If you have the space, consider a 9x20 or larger....
                    > As well as the size limit, micro-lathes are limited in power and rigidity...

                    I looked at them, but the size and $$$ makes them a non-starter for me at this point. One thing I like about the mini lathes is that I can pack them down into my basement by myself. Double or triple the weight would make it a real mess to move around. My requirements for a lathe are pretty minimal.... the wheels that I'll be making for my robots aren't going to be larger than 4 or 5cm at most and I don't mind take a little longer to do the cutting if need be.

                    Aaron
                  • Aaron Ramsey
                    Well, just to bookend this thread, I have a lathe! I ended up going with the Taig microlathe, primarily because I can convert it to CNC just by mounting the
                    Message 9 of 27 , Sep 10 8:24 PM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Well, just to bookend this thread, I have a lathe! I ended up going
                      with the Taig microlathe, primarily because I can convert it to CNC just
                      by mounting the lathe headstock on my Taig mill. All the other solutions
                      were going to cost me some coin to move up to CNC.

                      I was on the verge of buying a big machine... I was offered up a 10x18
                      off-list but would have to wait for a while (and carry a 350 pound
                      machine into my basement!). I found a guy selling a 7x12 locally (never
                      used) but he wanted to sell a mill and the lathe together so that didn't
                      pan out. I actually walked into BusyBee with a credit card ready to buy
                      a 9x19 but managed to make it out alive.

                      Going to a bigger machine was pretty tempting... most advice I've seen
                      out there is that you'll end up regretting a small machine when you
                      could have gone bigger. The cost difference between the smaller ones and
                      the bigger ones isn't that significant.

                      In the end though I really wanted a more mobile machine, don't have an
                      immediate need for bigger capabilities and the ability to CNC for no $$$
                      later on was what tipped me over the edge.

                      Now, need to get my hands on some aluminum bars and start turning
                      minisumo wheels! Metal Supermarket had better be open on saturdays!!!!! ;-)

                      Aaron


                      On 10-09-01 4:00 PM, Aaron wrote:
                      > Dang, both the Grizzly and Microlux machines are backordered. Which ever one comes available first will be making its way to my shop I guess. Grizzly is telling me that the G8688 should be available the week of the 14th. MicroMark won't give me a date but I've got an email alert set up for when it finally shows up.<grin>
                      >
                      > Aaron
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, "pic1832"<pic1832@...> wrote:
                      >> Hi Aaron,
                      >>
                      >> I bought a 7X10 from MicroMark in USA about 6 years ago (with all the options available). I converted it to CNC right away cause I am not a machinist and a very impatient perfectionist.
                      >> They have a new one now;
                      >> http://www.micromark.com/MICROLUX-7x14-MINI-LATHE,8176.html
                      >>
                      >> This one is longer and looks nicer with the silver paint job instead of the ugly red I have.
                      >> The reasons why I chose this one, that I can think of right now;
                      >>
                      >> The digital spindle speed indicator, metal gears at the output stage, heavy cast Iron bed and oh yeh, they shipped to Canada.
                      >>
                      >> Grizzly, harbor freights and micromark machines are made by the same company in China so the quality is the same. If you tune it right, you might be able to get +/- 0.001" if you creep up to the final dimension and do about 4 to 10 passes at the end (depending on tool deflection and the length of the part).
                      >>
                      >> I don't know about the busy bee or the taig stuff. I had a sherline mill and didn't like it because it was too flimsy. I had to make real light cuts (0.010" max) on 6061T6 Alum. I sold it and bought the MicroMark mini Mill and converted that one to CNC as well.
                      >> The most important selection criteria should be the stiffness of the machine. The heavier the Cast Iron bed, the more stable it will be when cutting and the heavier the cut can be.
                      >> If I had to buy them over again, I'd pick the same setup.
                      >> Then again, in 6 years, the quality could've gone up or down...
                      >> good luck
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> Mark
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Ramsey<aaronsmaillistaccount@> wrote:
                      >>> Howdy,
                      >>>
                      >>> I've been kicking around the idea of picking up a lathe for a while now
                      >>> to make small parts for my robots (and possible other things). Its
                      >>> gotten to the point where it is a bit of a pain in the *ss not actually
                      >>> having it. I don't neeeeed it, but I really want it. ;-)
                      >>>
                      >>> I've narrowed my choices down to the following:
                      >>>
                      >>> Taig Microlathe : http://www.taigtools.com/mlathe.html
                      >>> Sherline 4000 : http://www.sherline.com/4000pg.htm
                      >>> Grizzly G8688 7x12 :
                      >>> http://www.grizzly.com/products/7-x-12-Mini-Metal-Lathe/G8688
                      >>> Harborfreight mini 7x10 :
                      >>> http://www.harborfreight.com/7-inch-x-10-inch-precision-mini-lathe-93212.html
                      >>> BusyBee 7x8 :
                      >>> http://www.busybeetools.com/products/LATHE-METAL-CUTTING-MINI-METRIC-7IN.-X-8IN..html
                      >>>
                      >>> I figure that there must be someone out there on the list with some
                      >>> experience with these smaller lathes.
                      >>>
                      >>> I like the Taig because the quality of my Taig mill is really nice and I
                      >>> can get the Taig in town at Lee Valley. The Sherline basically matches
                      >>> the Taig in capabilities but had an endless supply of goodies and
                      >>> add-ons from Sherline... plus can be gotten from Solarbotics.
                      >>>
                      >>> The Busybee appears to be the same machine as the Harborfreight but with
                      >>> a smaller motor for some reason. From what I've read, the 7x10 lathes
                      >>> are actually overstating their bed length and 7x8 is actually the real
                      >>> length. I don't need a long bed so that doesn't really matter, but I
                      >>> can't figure out why BusyBee would downrate the motor. The BusyBee is
                      >>> available in town, so that's a plus. The harborfreight could be shipped,
                      >>> or I could drive down to Syracuse to pick it up.
                      >>>
                      >>> The Grizzly looks like a nice machine and comes with a bunch of extras
                      >>> that the others don't. The only way to get it is to ship it though,
                      >>> which means dealing with UPS. I'm actually leaning towards this one in
                      >>> spite of the shipping hassles. Its easy to get replacement parts from
                      >>> Grizzly, has the highest capacity of them all and has pretty decent reviews.
                      >>>
                      >>> Anyone done any work with a microlathe?
                      >>>
                      >>> Aaron
                    • krazatchu Grant
                      Good to hear you ve got a lathe... What about the 10x18... is it still available? Michael To: ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com From: aaronsmaillistaccount@gmail.com
                      Message 10 of 27 , Sep 11 8:06 PM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Good to hear you've got a lathe...
                        What about the 10x18... is it still available?

                        Michael


                        To: ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com
                        From: aaronsmaillistaccount@...
                        Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2010 23:24:51 -0400
                        Subject: Re: [ORE_bits] Re: Lathe

                         
                        Well, just to bookend this thread, I have a lathe! I ended up going
                        with the Taig microlathe, primarily because I can convert it to CNC just
                        by mounting the lathe headstock on my Taig mill. All the other solutions
                        were going to cost me some coin to move up to CNC.

                        I was on the verge of buying a big machine... I was offered up a 10x18
                        off-list but would have to wait for a while (and carry a 350 pound
                        machine into my basement!). I found a guy selling a 7x12 locally (never
                        used) but he wanted to sell a mill and the lathe together so that didn't
                        pan out. I actually walked into BusyBee with a credit card ready to buy
                        a 9x19 but managed to make it out alive.

                        Going to a bigger machine was pretty tempting... most advice I've seen
                        out there is that you'll end up regretting a small machine when you
                        could have gone bigger. The cost difference between the smaller ones and
                        the bigger ones isn't that significant.

                        In the end though I really wanted a more mobile machine, don't have an
                        immediate need for bigger capabilities and the ability to CNC for no $$$
                        later on was what tipped me over the edge.

                        Now, need to get my hands on some aluminum bars and start turning
                        minisumo wheels! Metal Supermarket had better be open on saturdays!!!!! ;-)

                        Aaron

                        On 10-09-01 4:00 PM, Aaron wrote:
                        > Dang, both the Grizzly and Microlux machines are backordered. Which ever one comes available first will be making its way to my shop I guess. Grizzly is telling me that the G8688 should be available the week of the 14th. MicroMark won't give me a date but I've got an email alert set up for when it finally shows up.<grin>
                        >
                        > Aaron
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, "pic1832"<pic1832@...> wrote:
                        >> Hi Aaron,
                        >>
                        >> I bought a 7X10 from MicroMark in USA about 6 years ago (with all the options available). I converted it to CNC right away cause I am not a machinist and a very impatient perfectionist.
                        >> They have a new one now;
                        >> http://www.micromark.com/MICROLUX-7x14-MINI-LATHE,8176.html
                        >>
                        >> This one is longer and looks nicer with the silver paint job instead of the ugly red I have.
                        >> The reasons why I chose this one, that I can think of right now;
                        >>
                        >> The digital spindle speed indicator, metal gears at the output stage, heavy cast Iron bed and oh yeh, they shipped to Canada.
                        >>
                        >> Grizzly, harbor freights and micromark machines are made by the same company in China so the quality is the same. If you tune it right, you might be able to get +/- 0.001" if you creep up to the final dimension and do about 4 to 10 passes at the end (depending on tool deflection and the length of the part).
                        >>
                        >> I don't know about the busy bee or the taig stuff. I had a sherline mill and didn't like it because it was too flimsy. I had to make real light cuts (0.010" max) on 6061T6 Alum. I sold it and bought the MicroMark mini Mill and converted that one to CNC as well.
                        >> The most important selection criteria should be the stiffness of the machine. The heavier the Cast Iron bed, the more stable it will be when cutting and the heavier the cut can be.
                        >> If I had to buy them over again, I'd pick the same setup.
                        >> Then again, in 6 years, the quality could've gone up or down...
                        >> good luck
                        >>
                        >>
                        >> Mark
                        >>
                        >>
                        >> --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Ramsey<aaronsmaillistaccount@> wrote:
                        >>> Howdy,
                        >>>
                        >>> I've been kicking around the idea of picking up a lathe for a while now
                        >>> to make small parts for my robots (and possible other things). Its
                        >>> gotten to the point where it is a bit of a pain in the *ss not actually
                        >>> having it. I don't neeeeed it, but I really want it. ;-)
                        >>>
                        >>> I've narrowed my choices down to the following:
                        >>>
                        >>> Taig Microlathe : http://www.taigtools.com/mlathe.html
                        >>> Sherline 4000 : http://www.sherline.com/4000pg.htm
                        >>> Grizzly G8688 7x12 :
                        >>> http://www.grizzly.com/products/7-x-12-Mini-Metal-Lathe/G8688
                        >>> Harborfreight mini 7x10 :
                        >>> http://www.harborfreight.com/7-inch-x-10-inch-precision-mini-lathe-93212.html
                        >>> BusyBee 7x8 :
                        >>> http://www.busybeetools.com/products/LATHE-METAL-CUTTING-MINI-METRIC-7IN.-X-8IN..html
                        >>>
                        >>> I figure that there must be someone out there on the list with some
                        >>> experience with these smaller lathes.
                        >>>
                        >>> I like the Taig because the quality of my Taig mill is really nice and I
                        >>> can get the Taig in town at Lee Valley. The Sherline basically matches
                        >>> the Taig in capabilities but had an endless supply of goodies and
                        >>> add-ons from Sherline... plus can be gotten from Solarbotics.
                        >>>
                        >>> The Busybee appears to be the same machine as the Harborfreight but with
                        >>> a smaller motor for some reason. From what I've read, the 7x10 lathes
                        >>> are actually overstating their bed length and 7x8 is actually the real
                        >>> length. I don't need a long bed so that doesn't really matter, but I
                        >>> can't figure out why BusyBee would downrate the motor. The BusyBee is
                        >>> available in town, so that's a plus. The harborfreight could be shipped,
                        >>> or I could drive down to Syracuse to pick it up.
                        >>>
                        >>> The Grizzly looks like a nice machine and comes with a bunch of extras
                        >>> that the others don't. The only way to get it is to ship it though,
                        >>> which means dealing with UPS. I'm actually leaning towards this one in
                        >>> spite of the shipping hassles. Its easy to get replacement parts from
                        >>> Grizzly, has the highest capacity of them all and has pretty decent reviews.
                        >>>
                        >>> Anyone done any work with a microlathe?
                        >>>
                        >>> Aaron


                      • Aaron Ramsey
                        I think so. The guy who owns it is one of the ORE members, so hopefully he will see your post and contact you. Aaron On 10-09-11 11:06 PM, krazatchu Grant
                        Message 11 of 27 , Sep 12 3:46 AM
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I think so. The guy who owns it is one of the ORE members, so hopefully he will see your post and contact you.

                          Aaron


                          On 10-09-11 11:06 PM, krazatchu Grant wrote:
                          Good to hear you've got a lathe...
                          What about the 10x18... is it still available?

                          Michael


                          To: ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com
                          From: aaronsmaillistaccount@...
                          Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2010 23:24:51 -0400
                          Subject: Re: [ORE_bits] Re: Lathe

                           
                          Well, just to bookend this thread, I have a lathe! I ended up going
                          with the Taig microlathe, primarily because I can convert it to CNC just
                          by mounting the lathe headstock on my Taig mill. All the other solutions
                          were going to cost me some coin to move up to CNC.

                          I was on the verge of buying a big machine... I was offered up a 10x18
                          off-list but would have to wait for a while (and carry a 350 pound
                          machine into my basement!). I found a guy selling a 7x12 locally (never
                          used) but he wanted to sell a mill and the lathe together so that didn't
                          pan out. I actually walked into BusyBee with a credit card ready to buy
                          a 9x19 but managed to make it out alive.

                          Going to a bigger machine was pretty tempting... most advice I've seen
                          out there is that you'll end up regretting a small machine when you
                          could have gone bigger. The cost difference between the smaller ones and
                          the bigger ones isn't that significant.

                          In the end though I really wanted a more mobile machine, don't have an
                          immediate need for bigger capabilities and the ability to CNC for no $$$
                          later on was what tipped me over the edge.

                          Now, need to get my hands on some aluminum bars and start turning
                          minisumo wheels! Metal Supermarket had better be open on saturdays!!!!! ;-)

                          Aaron

                          On 10-09-01 4:00 PM, Aaron wrote:
                          > Dang, both the Grizzly and Microlux machines are backordered. Which ever one comes available first will be making its way to my shop I guess. Grizzly is telling me that the G8688 should be available the week of the 14th. MicroMark won't give me a date but I've got an email alert set up for when it finally shows up.<grin>
                          >
                          > Aaron
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, "pic1832"<pic1832@...> wrote:
                          >> Hi Aaron,
                          >>
                          >> I bought a 7X10 from MicroMark in USA about 6 years ago (with all the options available). I converted it to CNC right away cause I am not a machinist and a very impatient perfectionist.
                          >> They have a new one now;
                          >> http://www.micromark.com/MICROLUX-7x14-MINI-LATHE,8176.html
                          >>
                          >> This one is longer and looks nicer with the silver paint job instead of the ugly red I have.
                          >> The reasons why I chose this one, that I can think of right now;
                          >>
                          >> The digital spindle speed indicator, metal gears at the output stage, heavy cast Iron bed and oh yeh, they shipped to Canada.
                          >>
                          >> Grizzly, harbor freights and micromark machines are made by the same company in China so the quality is the same. If you tune it right, you might be able to get +/- 0.001" if you creep up to the final dimension and do about 4 to 10 passes at the end (depending on tool deflection and the length of the part).
                          >>
                          >> I don't know about the busy bee or the taig stuff. I had a sherline mill and didn't like it because it was too flimsy. I had to make real light cuts (0.010" max) on 6061T6 Alum. I sold it and bought the MicroMark mini Mill and converted that one to CNC as well.
                          >> The most important selection criteria should be the stiffness of the machine. The heavier the Cast Iron bed, the more stable it will be when cutting and the heavier the cut can be.
                          >> If I had to buy them over again, I'd pick the same setup.
                          >> Then again, in 6 years, the quality could've gone up or down...
                          >> good luck
                          >>
                          >>
                          >> Mark
                          >>
                          >>
                          >> --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Ramsey<aaronsmaillistaccount@> wrote:
                          >>> Howdy,
                          >>>
                          >>> I've been kicking around the idea of picking up a lathe for a while now
                          >>> to make small parts for my robots (and possible other things). Its
                          >>> gotten to the point where it is a bit of a pain in the *ss not actually
                          >>> having it. I don't neeeeed it, but I really want it. ;-)
                          >>>
                          >>> I've narrowed my choices down to the following:
                          >>>
                          >>> Taig Microlathe : http://www.taigtools.com/mlathe.html
                          >>> Sherline 4000 : http://www.sherline.com/4000pg.htm
                          >>> Grizzly G8688 7x12 :
                          >>> http://www.grizzly.com/products/7-x-12-Mini-Metal-Lathe/G8688
                          >>> Harborfreight mini 7x10 :
                          >>> http://www.harborfreight.com/7-inch-x-10-inch-precision-mini-lathe-93212.html
                          >>> BusyBee 7x8 :
                          >>> http://www.busybeetools.com/products/LATHE-METAL-CUTTING-MINI-METRIC-7IN.-X-8IN..html
                          >>>
                          >>> I figure that there must be someone out there on the list with some
                          >>> experience with these smaller lathes.
                          >>>
                          >>> I like the Taig because the quality of my Taig mill is really nice and I
                          >>> can get the Taig in town at Lee Valley. The Sherline basically matches
                          >>> the Taig in capabilities but had an endless supply of goodies and
                          >>> add-ons from Sherline... plus can be gotten from Solarbotics.
                          >>>
                          >>> The Busybee appears to be the same machine as the Harborfreight but with
                          >>> a smaller motor for some reason. From what I've read, the 7x10 lathes
                          >>> are actually overstating their bed length and 7x8 is actually the real
                          >>> length. I don't need a long bed so that doesn't really matter, but I
                          >>> can't figure out why BusyBee would downrate the motor. The BusyBee is
                          >>> available in town, so that's a plus. The harborfreight could be shipped,
                          >>> or I could drive down to Syracuse to pick it up.
                          >>>
                          >>> The Grizzly looks like a nice machine and comes with a bunch of extras
                          >>> that the others don't. The only way to get it is to ship it though,
                          >>> which means dealing with UPS. I'm actually leaning towards this one in
                          >>> spite of the shipping hassles. Its easy to get replacement parts from
                          >>> Grizzly, has the highest capacity of them all and has pretty decent reviews.
                          >>>
                          >>> Anyone done any work with a microlathe?
                          >>>
                          >>> Aaron

                        • Aaron Ramsey
                          ... Well, Metal Supermarket is open Saturdays, but the better choice is Superior Metal : http://superiormetal.ca/ as many of you know I think. I picked up 2
                          Message 12 of 27 , Sep 19 6:37 PM
                          • 0 Attachment
                            On 10-09-10 11:24 PM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                            > Now, need to get my hands on some aluminum bars and start turning
                            > minisumo wheels! Metal Supermarket had better be open on saturdays!!!!! ;-)
                            Well, Metal Supermarket is open Saturdays, but the better choice is
                            Superior Metal : http://superiormetal.ca/ as many of you know I think.

                            I picked up 2 feet of 1-3/8 inch 6061 aluminum round bar and 2 feet of 1
                            inch 6061 aluminum round bar for $23 bucks. It spun nice on my lathe...
                            couldn't decide if I needed cutting fluid or not. WD40 didn't seem to
                            make any difference so I might not bother. ;-)

                            Turned one of the rods down to the outside diameter needed on my 4-wheel
                            drive minisumo. Just need to figure out how to bore the inside of the
                            rod next and I'm good to go. Weeeeeeeeee

                            Aaron
                          • pic1832
                            You don t need any cutting fluid for 6061-T6. However, if your cut is very aggressive @ high rpm, the heat generated, will melt the aluminum and weld some to
                            Message 13 of 27 , Sep 20 4:03 AM
                            • 0 Attachment
                              You don't need any cutting fluid for 6061-T6.
                              However, if your cut is very aggressive @ high rpm, the heat generated, will melt the aluminum and weld some to the tip of the cutter. In that case, WD40 will work wonders.
                              If you plan to cut aluminum bought from hardware stores, they are soft and gummy and WILL stick to your cutter and you will need to constantly spray shots of WD40.

                              Mark

                              --- In ORE_bits@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Ramsey <aaronsmaillistaccount@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > On 10-09-10 11:24 PM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                              > > Now, need to get my hands on some aluminum bars and start turning
                              > > minisumo wheels! Metal Supermarket had better be open on saturdays!!!!! ;-)
                              > Well, Metal Supermarket is open Saturdays, but the better choice is
                              > Superior Metal : http://superiormetal.ca/ as many of you know I think.
                              >
                              > I picked up 2 feet of 1-3/8 inch 6061 aluminum round bar and 2 feet of 1
                              > inch 6061 aluminum round bar for $23 bucks. It spun nice on my lathe...
                              > couldn't decide if I needed cutting fluid or not. WD40 didn't seem to
                              > make any difference so I might not bother. ;-)
                              >
                              > Turned one of the rods down to the outside diameter needed on my 4-wheel
                              > drive minisumo. Just need to figure out how to bore the inside of the
                              > rod next and I'm good to go. Weeeeeeeeee
                              >
                              > Aaron
                              >
                            • Richard Cook
                              ... Another tool to buy ... there are drill bits that fit into the non-moving part of the lathe that you then push into the turning piece. Also a drill press
                              Message 14 of 27 , Sep 20 7:24 AM
                              • 0 Attachment
                                On 10-09-19 09:37 PM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:

                                > Turned one of the rods down to the outside diameter needed on my 4-wheel
                                > drive minisumo. Just need to figure out how to bore the inside of the
                                > rod next and I'm good to go. Weeeeeeeeee

                                Another tool to buy ... there are drill bits that fit into the
                                non-moving part of the lathe that you then push into the turning piece.

                                Also a drill press (have not tried this):

                                http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2010/02/use_your_drill_press_in_reverse_to.html

                                --
                                Richard Cook, 613-591-1456
                              • Aaron Ramsey
                                ... I ve got a boring bar for the lathe. I ll drill a 1/2 inch hole into the piece using my tailstock and then bore out the inside to the right diameter. I
                                Message 15 of 27 , Sep 20 7:44 AM
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  On 2010-09-20, at 10:24 AM, Richard Cook <rpcook@...> wrote:

                                  > On 10-09-19 09:37 PM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                  >
                                  >> Turned one of the rods down to the outside diameter needed on my 4-wheel
                                  >> drive minisumo. Just need to figure out how to bore the inside of the
                                  >> rod next and I'm good to go. Weeeeeeeeee
                                  >
                                  > Another tool to buy ... there are drill bits that fit into the
                                  > non-moving part of the lathe that you then push into the turning piece.
                                  >

                                  I've got a boring bar for the lathe. I'll drill a 1/2 inch hole into the piece using my tailstock and then bore out the inside to the right diameter. I haven't figured how to finish the inside end though. The drill leaves a mark at the end which I need to make into a nice face. I guess some carefully positioning with the tool I use for facing the end will also work inside the hole maybe.

                                  Aaron
                                  >
                                • Richard Cook
                                  ... You seem to have it well in hand. Challenges. :) -- Richard Cook, 613-591-1456
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Sep 20 8:07 AM
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    On 10-09-20 10:44 AM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                    > The
                                    > drill leaves a mark at the end which I need to make into a nice face. I
                                    > guess some carefully positioning with the tool I use for facing the end
                                    > will also work inside the hole maybe.

                                    You seem to have it well in hand.
                                    Challenges. :)

                                    --
                                    Richard Cook, 613-591-1456
                                  • Aaron Ramsey
                                    ... Ha ha. Well in hand might be a stretch. I have a plan and that s about it. Skill and knowledge are sadly lacking at this point. ;-) Aaron
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Sep 20 8:11 AM
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      On 2010-09-20, at 11:07 AM, Richard Cook <rpcook@...> wrote:

                                      > On 10-09-20 10:44 AM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                      >> The
                                      >> drill leaves a mark at the end which I need to make into a nice face. I
                                      >> guess some carefully positioning with the tool I use for facing the end
                                      >> will also work inside the hole maybe.
                                      >
                                      > You seem to have it well in hand.
                                      > Challenges. :)
                                      >

                                      Ha ha. Well in hand might be a stretch. I have a plan and that's about it. Skill and knowledge are sadly lacking at this point. ;-)

                                      Aaron
                                    • Graham
                                      According to their website Superior Metal is also open Saturday morning. I had a look at their web site. The really interesting thing is that Superior Metal
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Sep 20 3:36 PM
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        According to their website Superior Metal is also open Saturday morning.

                                        I had a look at their web site. The really interesting thing is that
                                        Superior Metal used to be Metal Supermarket!

                                        I don't know when the moved and / or split, I guess I just blinked and
                                        missed it.

                                        In any case, if you are using carbide inserts to turn the aluminium then
                                        cutting fluid or coolant is not really necessary at the feeds and speed
                                        you are likely to put it under on your small lathe (Taig I think you
                                        said). A bit of cutting fluid is preferable however if you are using HSS
                                        cutting bits. WD40 works just fine but I also use A9 cutting fluid
                                        (Brafasco, Ottawa Fastener supply has it as might Fastenal). Definitely
                                        use a cutting fluid when tapping or threading even if it doesn't seem to
                                        make a difference, your taps and dies will last much longer.

                                        If you think 6061 turns nice, you should try some 7075. A bit more
                                        expensive and you can't anodize. As light as aluminium should be but as
                                        strong as mild steel.

                                        cheers, Graham



                                        On Sun, 2010-09-19 at 21:37 -0400, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                        > On 10-09-10 11:24 PM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                        > > Now, need to get my hands on some aluminum bars and start turning
                                        > > minisumo wheels! Metal Supermarket had better be open on saturdays!!!!! ;-)
                                        > Well, Metal Supermarket is open Saturdays, but the better choice is
                                        > Superior Metal : http://superiormetal.ca/ as many of you know I think.
                                        >
                                        > I picked up 2 feet of 1-3/8 inch 6061 aluminum round bar and 2 feet of 1
                                        > inch 6061 aluminum round bar for $23 bucks. It spun nice on my lathe...
                                        > couldn't decide if I needed cutting fluid or not. WD40 didn't seem to
                                        > make any difference so I might not bother. ;-)
                                        >
                                        > Turned one of the rods down to the outside diameter needed on my 4-wheel
                                        > drive minisumo. Just need to figure out how to bore the inside of the
                                        > rod next and I'm good to go. Weeeeeeeeee
                                        >
                                        > Aaron
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                      • Aaron Ramsey
                                        ... The story I heard is that the guy who owned the original Metal Supermarket decided to branch off on his own rather than being part of the franchise,
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Sep 20 5:11 PM
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          On 10-09-20 6:36 PM, Graham wrote:
                                          > According to their website Superior Metal is also open Saturday morning.
                                          >
                                          > I had a look at their web site. The really interesting thing is that
                                          > Superior Metal used to be Metal Supermarket!
                                          >
                                          > I don't know when the moved and / or split, I guess I just blinked and
                                          > missed it.
                                          >
                                          The story I heard is that the guy who owned the original Metal
                                          Supermarket decided to branch off on his own rather than being part of
                                          the franchise, becoming Superior Metal. A former employee then picked up
                                          the Metal Supermarket franchise and burnt a bridge or two along the way. ;-)

                                          Anyhow, the prices seem better at Superior and the guys are friendly so
                                          I'm going to stick with them for the time being.
                                          > In any case, if you are using carbide inserts to turn the aluminium then
                                          > cutting fluid or coolant is not really necessary at the feeds and speed
                                          > you are likely to put it under on your small lathe (Taig I think you
                                          > said). A bit of cutting fluid is preferable however if you are using HSS
                                          > cutting bits. WD40 works just fine but I also use A9 cutting fluid
                                          > (Brafasco, Ottawa Fastener supply has it as might Fastenal). Definitely
                                          > use a cutting fluid when tapping or threading even if it doesn't seem to
                                          > make a difference, your taps and dies will last much longer.
                                          >
                                          I'm using HSS tools so I was squirting WD40 on everything today as I
                                          cut. Definitely made a difference. I'm going to have to stop by OFS and
                                          pick up some real cutting fluid I think.

                                          > If you think 6061 turns nice, you should try some 7075. A bit more
                                          > expensive and you can't anodize. As light as aluminium should be but as
                                          > strong as mild steel.
                                          I'll have to get my hands on that and try it out. I also want to try my
                                          hands at brass. The sumo wheel that I cut out of aluminum today is
                                          mighty light... It came out to 14 grams after I bored it out (28mm long,
                                          24mm diameter). Even once I get the sticky silicon wrapped around it, it
                                          will be way less than 20 grams. Maybe I'm going to have to spin them out
                                          of lead. ;-)

                                          Aaron
                                        • Normand Fisher
                                          I just bough some aluminium at Metal Supermarket. Service was excellent. I was told by the new franchise owner that the previous owner (now Superior Metal)
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Sep 20 6:48 PM
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            I just bough some aluminium at Metal Supermarket.  Service was excellent.
                                            I was told by the new franchise "owner" that the previous owner (now Superior Metal)
                                            let go of the franchise that was picked up by one of it's former employee (hence the new location on Stevenage.

                                            Guess that gives us two sources for material.

                                            Normand

                                            On Mon, Sep 20, 2010 at 6:36 PM, Graham <planophore@...> wrote:
                                            According to their website Superior Metal is also open Saturday morning.

                                            I had a look at their web site. The really interesting thing is that
                                            Superior Metal used to be Metal Supermarket!

                                            I don't know when the moved and / or split, I guess I just blinked and
                                            missed it.

                                            In any case, if you are using carbide inserts to turn the aluminium then
                                            cutting fluid or coolant is not really necessary at the feeds and speed
                                            you are likely to put it under on your small lathe (Taig I think you
                                            said). A bit of cutting fluid is preferable however if you are using HSS
                                            cutting bits. WD40 works just fine but I also use A9 cutting fluid
                                            (Brafasco, Ottawa Fastener supply has it as might Fastenal). Definitely
                                            use a cutting fluid when tapping or threading even if it doesn't seem to
                                            make a difference, your taps and dies will last much longer.

                                            If you think 6061 turns nice, you should try some 7075. A bit more
                                            expensive and you can't anodize. As light as aluminium should be but as
                                            strong as mild steel.

                                            cheers, Graham



                                            On Sun, 2010-09-19 at 21:37 -0400, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                            > On 10-09-10 11:24 PM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                            > > Now, need to get my hands on some aluminum bars and start turning
                                            > > minisumo wheels! Metal Supermarket had better be open on saturdays!!!!! ;-)
                                            > Well, Metal Supermarket is open Saturdays, but the better choice is
                                            > Superior Metal : http://superiormetal.ca/ as many of you know I think.
                                            >
                                            > I picked up 2 feet of 1-3/8 inch 6061 aluminum round bar and 2 feet of 1
                                            > inch 6061 aluminum round bar for $23 bucks. It spun nice on my lathe...
                                            > couldn't decide if I needed cutting fluid or not. WD40 didn't seem to
                                            > make any difference so I might not bother. ;-)
                                            >
                                            > Turned one of the rods down to the outside diameter needed on my 4-wheel
                                            > drive minisumo. Just need to figure out how to bore the inside of the
                                            > rod next and I'm good to go. Weeeeeeeeee
                                            >
                                            > Aaron
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >




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                                          • va3tjp
                                            Well, that s a normal drill chuck with an M2 or M3 tapered collet fitting into the tailstock. Keep the taper clean, watch out for the drill chuck spinning
                                            Message 21 of 27 , Sep 21 7:10 AM
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              Well, that's a normal drill chuck with an M2 or M3 tapered collet fitting into the tailstock. Keep the taper clean, watch out for the drill chuck spinning which is not good for the taper finish, always use a centre drill bit for the pilot hole and make sure your work is properly centred.

                                              Not trying to teach you how to suck eggs but I hate to think of someone trying to "use a drill press in reverse" !!!

                                              > Another tool to buy ... there are drill bits that fit into the
                                              > non-moving part of the lathe that you then push into the turning piece.
                                              >
                                              > Also a drill press (have not tried this):
                                              >
                                              > http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2010/02/use_your_drill_press_in_reverse_to.html
                                              >
                                              > --
                                              > Richard Cook, 613-591-1456
                                              >
                                            • Richard Cook
                                              ... No problem! It is always a trade-off between cost and frequency of use. I someone has an inventive way of using what they have I am always interested in
                                              Message 22 of 27 , Sep 21 8:49 AM
                                              • 0 Attachment
                                                On 10-09-21 10:10 AM, va3tjp wrote:
                                                > Not trying to teach you how to suck eggs but I hate to think of someone
                                                > trying to "use a drill press in reverse" !!!

                                                No problem! It is always a trade-off between cost and frequency of use.
                                                I someone has an inventive way of using what they have I am always
                                                interested in learning.

                                                --
                                                Richard Cook, 613-591-1456
                                              • Graham
                                                Aaron, thanks for the info re Superior VS Metal Supermarkets. I will keep going to Superior myself. As to real cutting fluid, whatever works is usually good
                                                Message 23 of 27 , Sep 21 1:45 PM
                                                • 0 Attachment
                                                  Aaron,

                                                  thanks for the info re Superior VS Metal Supermarkets. I will keep going
                                                  to Superior myself.

                                                  As to real cutting fluid, whatever works is usually good enough. Some
                                                  use nothing but WD40 on aluminium. Some use kerosene.

                                                  Copper is an interesting metal to turn, very gummy. Believe it or not
                                                  whole milk works very well as a cutting fluid for turning copper.

                                                  A few quick online searches will get you much info on cutting fluids.

                                                  If you go to Busy Bee tools they have a product on the shelf called (I
                                                  think) Safe-T-Tap. It is water based. I tried it and didn't like it all.
                                                  I found it stained just about any metal I used it on.

                                                  Bashing metal, lots of fun. It is nice to be able to make or modify what
                                                  you want and adds a whole new dimension to building from scratch.

                                                  cheers, Graham


                                                  On Mon, 2010-09-20 at 20:11 -0400, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                                  > On 10-09-20 6:36 PM, Graham wrote:
                                                  > > According to their website Superior Metal is also open Saturday morning.
                                                  > >
                                                  > > I had a look at their web site. The really interesting thing is that
                                                  > > Superior Metal used to be Metal Supermarket!
                                                  > >
                                                  > > I don't know when the moved and / or split, I guess I just blinked and
                                                  > > missed it.
                                                  > >
                                                  > The story I heard is that the guy who owned the original Metal
                                                  > Supermarket decided to branch off on his own rather than being part of
                                                  > the franchise, becoming Superior Metal. A former employee then picked up
                                                  > the Metal Supermarket franchise and burnt a bridge or two along the way. ;-)
                                                  >
                                                  > Anyhow, the prices seem better at Superior and the guys are friendly so
                                                  > I'm going to stick with them for the time being.
                                                  > > In any case, if you are using carbide inserts to turn the aluminium then
                                                  > > cutting fluid or coolant is not really necessary at the feeds and speed
                                                  > > you are likely to put it under on your small lathe (Taig I think you
                                                  > > said). A bit of cutting fluid is preferable however if you are using HSS
                                                  > > cutting bits. WD40 works just fine but I also use A9 cutting fluid
                                                  > > (Brafasco, Ottawa Fastener supply has it as might Fastenal). Definitely
                                                  > > use a cutting fluid when tapping or threading even if it doesn't seem to
                                                  > > make a difference, your taps and dies will last much longer.
                                                  > >
                                                  > I'm using HSS tools so I was squirting WD40 on everything today as I
                                                  > cut. Definitely made a difference. I'm going to have to stop by OFS and
                                                  > pick up some real cutting fluid I think.
                                                  >
                                                  > > If you think 6061 turns nice, you should try some 7075. A bit more
                                                  > > expensive and you can't anodize. As light as aluminium should be but as
                                                  > > strong as mild steel.
                                                  > I'll have to get my hands on that and try it out. I also want to try my
                                                  > hands at brass. The sumo wheel that I cut out of aluminum today is
                                                  > mighty light... It came out to 14 grams after I bored it out (28mm long,
                                                  > 24mm diameter). Even once I get the sticky silicon wrapped around it, it
                                                  > will be way less than 20 grams. Maybe I'm going to have to spin them out
                                                  > of lead. ;-)
                                                  >
                                                  > Aaron
                                                  >
                                                • Graham
                                                  There are others. For example, another one I go to is Lucon Metal http://www.louconmetal.com/ off of the south end of Merivale, South of Hunt Club, on Grenfell
                                                  Message 24 of 27 , Sep 21 1:49 PM
                                                  • 0 Attachment
                                                    There are others.

                                                    For example, another one I go to is Lucon Metal

                                                    http://www.louconmetal.com/

                                                    off of the south end of Merivale, South of Hunt Club, on Grenfell
                                                    crescent. Only open Mon through Friday however. Also, very
                                                    knowledgeable, and helpful.

                                                    cheers, Graham




                                                    On Mon, 2010-09-20 at 21:48 -0400, Normand Fisher wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > I just bough some aluminium at Metal Supermarket. Service was
                                                    > excellent.
                                                    > I was told by the new franchise "owner" that the previous owner (now
                                                    > Superior Metal)
                                                    > let go of the franchise that was picked up by one of it's former
                                                    > employee (hence the new location on Stevenage.
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > Guess that gives us two sources for material.
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > Normand
                                                    >
                                                  • Darcy Whyte
                                                    I m jealous because I hardly have any tools for working with metal. Every time I need a part I wind up researching and waiting for mail order or making the
                                                    Message 25 of 27 , Sep 21 1:52 PM
                                                    • 0 Attachment

                                                      I'm jealous because I hardly have any tools for working with metal. Every time I need a part I wind up researching and waiting for mail order or making the part out of chicken wire and mud and stuff.

                                                      After I finish my laser cutter and bending system (and some other odds and ends), I'm going to get a lathe and some sort of small milling machine I think. I guess I need to figure out what I need but I suspect a lathe could be a lot of fun. 


                                                      On Tue, Sep 21, 2010 at 4:45 PM, Graham <planophore@...> wrote:
                                                       

                                                      Aaron,

                                                      thanks for the info re Superior VS Metal Supermarkets. I will keep going
                                                      to Superior myself.

                                                      As to real cutting fluid, whatever works is usually good enough. Some
                                                      use nothing but WD40 on aluminium. Some use kerosene.

                                                      Copper is an interesting metal to turn, very gummy. Believe it or not
                                                      whole milk works very well as a cutting fluid for turning copper.

                                                      A few quick online searches will get you much info on cutting fluids.

                                                      If you go to Busy Bee tools they have a product on the shelf called (I
                                                      think) Safe-T-Tap. It is water based. I tried it and didn't like it all.
                                                      I found it stained just about any metal I used it on.

                                                      Bashing metal, lots of fun. It is nice to be able to make or modify what
                                                      you want and adds a whole new dimension to building from scratch.

                                                      cheers, Graham



                                                      On Mon, 2010-09-20 at 20:11 -0400, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                                      > On 10-09-20 6:36 PM, Graham wrote:
                                                      > > According to their website Superior Metal is also open Saturday morning.
                                                      > >
                                                      > > I had a look at their web site. The really interesting thing is that
                                                      > > Superior Metal used to be Metal Supermarket!
                                                      > >
                                                      > > I don't know when the moved and / or split, I guess I just blinked and
                                                      > > missed it.
                                                      > >
                                                      > The story I heard is that the guy who owned the original Metal
                                                      > Supermarket decided to branch off on his own rather than being part of
                                                      > the franchise, becoming Superior Metal. A former employee then picked up
                                                      > the Metal Supermarket franchise and burnt a bridge or two along the way. ;-)
                                                      >
                                                      > Anyhow, the prices seem better at Superior and the guys are friendly so
                                                      > I'm going to stick with them for the time being.
                                                      > > In any case, if you are using carbide inserts to turn the aluminium then
                                                      > > cutting fluid or coolant is not really necessary at the feeds and speed
                                                      > > you are likely to put it under on your small lathe (Taig I think you
                                                      > > said). A bit of cutting fluid is preferable however if you are using HSS
                                                      > > cutting bits. WD40 works just fine but I also use A9 cutting fluid
                                                      > > (Brafasco, Ottawa Fastener supply has it as might Fastenal). Definitely
                                                      > > use a cutting fluid when tapping or threading even if it doesn't seem to
                                                      > > make a difference, your taps and dies will last much longer.
                                                      > >
                                                      > I'm using HSS tools so I was squirting WD40 on everything today as I
                                                      > cut. Definitely made a difference. I'm going to have to stop by OFS and
                                                      > pick up some real cutting fluid I think.
                                                      >
                                                      > > If you think 6061 turns nice, you should try some 7075. A bit more
                                                      > > expensive and you can't anodize. As light as aluminium should be but as
                                                      > > strong as mild steel.
                                                      > I'll have to get my hands on that and try it out. I also want to try my
                                                      > hands at brass. The sumo wheel that I cut out of aluminum today is
                                                      > mighty light... It came out to 14 grams after I bored it out (28mm long,
                                                      > 24mm diameter). Even once I get the sticky silicon wrapped around it, it
                                                      > will be way less than 20 grams. Maybe I'm going to have to spin them out
                                                      > of lead. ;-)
                                                      >
                                                      > Aaron
                                                      >


                                                    • Graham
                                                      Darcy, If you are seriously considering a lathe, I have a Taig that is currently surplus to my needs that I am sure we could make a deal on. I likely even have
                                                      Message 26 of 27 , Sep 21 2:06 PM
                                                      • 0 Attachment
                                                        Darcy,

                                                        If you are seriously considering a lathe, I have a Taig that is
                                                        currently surplus to my needs that I am sure we could make a deal on. I
                                                        likely even have a fractional HP motor to go along with it and some
                                                        other bits and pieces.

                                                        Think about it and when you get back from your trip we can discuss.

                                                        you can contact off list later on planophore@... or
                                                        colling@...

                                                        cheers, Graham



                                                        On Tue, 2010-09-21 at 16:52 -0400, Darcy Whyte wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        > I'm jealous because I hardly have any tools for working with metal.
                                                        > Every time I need a part I wind up researching and waiting for mail
                                                        > order or making the part out of chicken wire and mud and stuff.
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        > After I finish my laser cutter and bending system (and some other odds
                                                        > and ends), I'm going to get a lathe and some sort of small milling
                                                        > machine I think. I guess I need to figure out what I need but I
                                                        > suspect a lathe could be a lot of fun.
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        > On Tue, Sep 21, 2010 at 4:45 PM, Graham <planophore@...> wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        > Aaron,
                                                        >
                                                        > thanks for the info re Superior VS Metal Supermarkets. I will
                                                        > keep going
                                                        > to Superior myself.
                                                        >
                                                        > As to real cutting fluid, whatever works is usually good
                                                        > enough. Some
                                                        > use nothing but WD40 on aluminium. Some use kerosene.
                                                        >
                                                        > Copper is an interesting metal to turn, very gummy. Believe it
                                                        > or not
                                                        > whole milk works very well as a cutting fluid for turning
                                                        > copper.
                                                        >
                                                        > A few quick online searches will get you much info on cutting
                                                        > fluids.
                                                        >
                                                        > If you go to Busy Bee tools they have a product on the shelf
                                                        > called (I
                                                        > think) Safe-T-Tap. It is water based. I tried it and didn't
                                                        > like it all.
                                                        > I found it stained just about any metal I used it on.
                                                        >
                                                        > Bashing metal, lots of fun. It is nice to be able to make or
                                                        > modify what
                                                        > you want and adds a whole new dimension to building from
                                                        > scratch.
                                                        >
                                                        > cheers, Graham
                                                        >
                                                      • Darcy Whyte
                                                        how much money we talking?
                                                        Message 27 of 27 , Sep 21 2:07 PM
                                                        • 0 Attachment
                                                          how much money we talking?


                                                          On Tue, Sep 21, 2010 at 5:06 PM, Graham <planophore@...> wrote:
                                                           

                                                          Darcy,

                                                          If you are seriously considering a lathe, I have a Taig that is
                                                          currently surplus to my needs that I am sure we could make a deal on. I
                                                          likely even have a fractional HP motor to go along with it and some
                                                          other bits and pieces.

                                                          Think about it and when you get back from your trip we can discuss.

                                                          you can contact off list later on planophore@... or
                                                          colling@...

                                                          cheers, Graham



                                                          On Tue, 2010-09-21 at 16:52 -0400, Darcy Whyte wrote:
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          > I'm jealous because I hardly have any tools for working with metal.
                                                          > Every time I need a part I wind up researching and waiting for mail
                                                          > order or making the part out of chicken wire and mud and stuff.
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          > After I finish my laser cutter and bending system (and some other odds
                                                          > and ends), I'm going to get a lathe and some sort of small milling
                                                          > machine I think. I guess I need to figure out what I need but I
                                                          > suspect a lathe could be a lot of fun.
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          > On Tue, Sep 21, 2010 at 4:45 PM, Graham <planophore@...> wrote:
                                                          >
                                                          > Aaron,
                                                          >
                                                          > thanks for the info re Superior VS Metal Supermarkets. I will
                                                          > keep going
                                                          > to Superior myself.
                                                          >
                                                          > As to real cutting fluid, whatever works is usually good
                                                          > enough. Some
                                                          > use nothing but WD40 on aluminium. Some use kerosene.
                                                          >
                                                          > Copper is an interesting metal to turn, very gummy. Believe it
                                                          > or not
                                                          > whole milk works very well as a cutting fluid for turning
                                                          > copper.
                                                          >
                                                          > A few quick online searches will get you much info on cutting
                                                          > fluids.
                                                          >
                                                          > If you go to Busy Bee tools they have a product on the shelf
                                                          > called (I
                                                          > think) Safe-T-Tap. It is water based. I tried it and didn't
                                                          > like it all.
                                                          > I found it stained just about any metal I used it on.
                                                          >
                                                          > Bashing metal, lots of fun. It is nice to be able to make or
                                                          > modify what
                                                          > you want and adds a whole new dimension to building from
                                                          > scratch.
                                                          >
                                                          > cheers, Graham
                                                          >


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