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Another kick at the micro-ore can

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  • Aaron Ramsey
    I just can t help myself... I love laying out PCBs. I was playing with my latest line follower over the holidays. It uses the micro-ore... actually the
    Message 1 of 19 , Jan 2, 2010
      I just can't help myself... I love laying out PCBs. I was playing with
      my latest line follower over the holidays. It uses the micro-ore...
      actually the micro-ore was pretty much designed for line following back
      when I made it in Oct 08. It works really well, but I got thinking that
      I'd like more I/O to turn it into a more general purpose small robot
      controller. <grin>

      So I spent a few days laying out a new board : Micro-ORE2!

      Schematics :
      http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
      http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch

      Board layout:
      http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
      http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
      http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
      http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png

      Where the original board used an 18 pin DSPIC30F3012for a processor,
      uore2 uses a 44 pin DSPIC30F4011 master processor and a 20 pin
      PIC18F14K22 slave processor. That adds up to one a half times more the
      horse power, two and a half times the memory and over three times the
      I/O. Where the original board had 5 A/D ports, 5 digital ports (shared
      with 3 optionally LEDs on the board and the I2C/UART port), and the
      ability to control either 2 motors or two servos for locomotion, the new
      board has 21 I/O ports (9 analog and 12 digital) all broken out to 3 pin
      servo style headers + a dedicated i2c port + 2 dedicated motor ports, an
      accelerometer, a 7 segment LED display and a dedicated 5V regulator for
      the I/O ports so no worrying about a brownout when driving a bunch of
      servos while trying to take readings from 9 Sharp sensors or something
      crazy. Oh ya, and a general purpose push button because it was driving
      me crazy that the old micro-ore board didn't have one. ;-)

      Where the old micro-ore board was 35mm by 35mm, the new micro-ore2
      board... well... ok, it didn't shrink. If I had wanted to make it
      smaller, I would have had to go to a four layer board and I'm too cheap
      to shell out the $$$. ;-) So the new board is 35mm by 35mm also.

      Why go with 2 processors? Well, I started with just the 44 pin processor
      and then decided that I wanted to have the 7-segment LED for feedback. I
      also didn't want to give up any of my precious A/D ports for the
      accelerometer, thinking that I want to have more line sensors for a more
      brainy line follower. I searched for a 64 pin chip that was small enough
      but Microchip only has 64 pin QFN chips in their newer 3.3V devices. For
      ease of use I wanted to stay with 5V so I plunked down a second processor.

      So, what is the downside to this new board? Well, the motor driver only
      handles 1A per channel typical with 1.2A max where the old one was 1.2A
      per channel with a 3A max. The old one has a 14 week lead time on it and
      I figured that I don't normally drive a bigger motor on these boards
      anyhow.

      And the other downside... this thing definitely cannot be soldered by
      hand unless you have a hot-air gun. It has 5 QFN devices on it. QFN is
      short for 'Holy F*ck, how the hell do I solder this thing". Basically it
      doesn't have any pins, just some metal pads on the bottom of the
      package. 5 minutes in my reflow oven and it should be good to go though.

      Anyhow, if anyone has an interest in double-checking my design and
      making sure I didn't go off track somewhere I'd appreciate it. I'm
      likely going to order 2 or 3 of them from APCircuits next week if
      everything looks kosher.

      Aaron
    • Ken@Home
      That s packing quite a bit on a single board...impressive. I guess with a single mounting hole on a board that small it isn t gong to be a problem, except
      Message 2 of 19 , Jan 3, 2010
        That's packing quite a bit on a single board...impressive.
        I guess with a single mounting hole on a board that small it isn't gong
        to be a problem, except possibly for the Z-axis of the accelerometer.
        That can be mitigated with properly sized rubber feet at the other
        corners to reduce movement.

        It looks like a pretty good (c/w kitchen sink) design, I don't see
        anything that jumps out. If I see it correctly, you are using the
        RS-232 channel for inter-processor comms (?)

        The reflow oven...is that a conversion/hack or ?

        Ken

        Aaron Ramsey wrote:
        >
        >
        > I just can't help myself... I love laying out PCBs. I was playing with
        > my latest line follower over the holidays. It uses the micro-ore...
        > actually the micro-ore was pretty much designed for line following back
        > when I made it in Oct 08. It works really well, but I got thinking that
        > I'd like more I/O to turn it into a more general purpose small robot
        > controller. <grin>
        >
        > So I spent a few days laying out a new board : Micro-ORE2!
        >
        > Schematics :
        > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
        > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf>
        > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch
        > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch>
        >
        > Board layout:
        > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
        > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd>
        > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
        > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png>
        > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
        > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png>
        > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png
        > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png>
        >
        > Where the original board used an 18 pin DSPIC30F3012for a processor,
        > uore2 uses a 44 pin DSPIC30F4011 master processor and a 20 pin
        > PIC18F14K22 slave processor. That adds up to one a half times more the
        > horse power, two and a half times the memory and over three times the
        > I/O. Where the original board had 5 A/D ports, 5 digital ports (shared
        > with 3 optionally LEDs on the board and the I2C/UART port), and the
        > ability to control either 2 motors or two servos for locomotion, the new
        > board has 21 I/O ports (9 analog and 12 digital) all broken out to 3 pin
        > servo style headers + a dedicated i2c port + 2 dedicated motor ports, an
        > accelerometer, a 7 segment LED display and a dedicated 5V regulator for
        > the I/O ports so no worrying about a brownout when driving a bunch of
        > servos while trying to take readings from 9 Sharp sensors or something
        > crazy. Oh ya, and a general purpose push button because it was driving
        > me crazy that the old micro-ore board didn't have one. ;-)
        >
        > Where the old micro-ore board was 35mm by 35mm, the new micro-ore2
        > board... well... ok, it didn't shrink. If I had wanted to make it
        > smaller, I would have had to go to a four layer board and I'm too cheap
        > to shell out the $$$. ;-) So the new board is 35mm by 35mm also.
        >
        > Why go with 2 processors? Well, I started with just the 44 pin processor
        > and then decided that I wanted to have the 7-segment LED for feedback. I
        > also didn't want to give up any of my precious A/D ports for the
        > accelerometer, thinking that I want to have more line sensors for a more
        > brainy line follower. I searched for a 64 pin chip that was small enough
        > but Microchip only has 64 pin QFN chips in their newer 3.3V devices. For
        > ease of use I wanted to stay with 5V so I plunked down a second processor.
        >
        > So, what is the downside to this new board? Well, the motor driver only
        > handles 1A per channel typical with 1.2A max where the old one was 1.2A
        > per channel with a 3A max. The old one has a 14 week lead time on it and
        > I figured that I don't normally drive a bigger motor on these boards
        > anyhow.
        >
        > And the other downside... this thing definitely cannot be soldered by
        > hand unless you have a hot-air gun. It has 5 QFN devices on it. QFN is
        > short for 'Holy F*ck, how the hell do I solder this thing". Basically it
        > doesn't have any pins, just some metal pads on the bottom of the
        > package. 5 minutes in my reflow oven and it should be good to go though.
        >
        > Anyhow, if anyone has an interest in double-checking my design and
        > making sure I didn't go off track somewhere I'd appreciate it. I'm
        > likely going to order 2 or 3 of them from APCircuits next week if
        > everything looks kosher.
        >
        > Aaron
        >
        >

        --
        Ken L. McKinnon
        klmckinnon@...
      • Aaron Ramsey
        I started with two mounting holes but had to throw one of them away when I added the 7-segment led. You ve got it right, I m using the second UART on
        Message 3 of 19 , Jan 3, 2010
          I started with two mounting holes but had to throw one of them away when
          I added the 7-segment led. <grin>

          You've got it right, I'm using the second UART on the 4011 to control
          the pic18f. It can run at a couple megabits per second if needed
          although I don't think that will be necessary with this design though.
          The other UART comes out to a header. I could have used the I2C bus
          instead but the i2c pins are shared with the in-circuit programming pins
          on the 4011 and it looked easier to debug if I used the UART instead.

          I picked up a reflow oven this summer :
          http://www.puhuit.com/main/page_products_t962_ir_ovenic_heater.html

          I started off looking at hot-air guns for around $200 and it snowballed
          from there a bit. ;-) A hot-air gun is good but can be a pain to get
          everything just right without blowing away the components. I then
          started looking at getting a toaster oven and modding it but the cost of
          that was incredibly close to the actual commercial oven and involved
          alot more screwing around to get running so I bit the bullet and spent
          the $$$ on the real deal. They run around $400 on ebay. I paid around
          $420 with shipping and 3 spare IR bulbs.

          The trick is getting the solder paste in the right place. I've using a
          syringe for now but will likely end up using the Pololu stencil cutting
          services at some point once I need to make more than a couple of boards
          with it.

          http://www.pololu.com/catalog/product/446

          Aaron


          On 10-01-03 2:53 PM3-Jan-10, Ken@Home wrote:
          > That's packing quite a bit on a single board...impressive.
          > I guess with a single mounting hole on a board that small it isn't gong
          > to be a problem, except possibly for the Z-axis of the accelerometer.
          > That can be mitigated with properly sized rubber feet at the other
          > corners to reduce movement.
          >
          > It looks like a pretty good (c/w kitchen sink) design, I don't see
          > anything that jumps out. If I see it correctly, you are using the
          > RS-232 channel for inter-processor comms (?)
          >
          > The reflow oven...is that a conversion/hack or ?
          >
          > Ken
          >
          > Aaron Ramsey wrote:
          >
          >>
          >>
          >> I just can't help myself... I love laying out PCBs. I was playing with
          >> my latest line follower over the holidays. It uses the micro-ore...
          >> actually the micro-ore was pretty much designed for line following back
          >> when I made it in Oct 08. It works really well, but I got thinking that
          >> I'd like more I/O to turn it into a more general purpose small robot
          >> controller.<grin>
          >>
          >> So I spent a few days laying out a new board : Micro-ORE2!
          >>
          >> Schematics :
          >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
          >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf>
          >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch
          >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch>
          >>
          >> Board layout:
          >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
          >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd>
          >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
          >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png>
          >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
          >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png>
          >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png
          >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png>
          >>
          >> Where the original board used an 18 pin DSPIC30F3012for a processor,
          >> uore2 uses a 44 pin DSPIC30F4011 master processor and a 20 pin
          >> PIC18F14K22 slave processor. That adds up to one a half times more the
          >> horse power, two and a half times the memory and over three times the
          >> I/O. Where the original board had 5 A/D ports, 5 digital ports (shared
          >> with 3 optionally LEDs on the board and the I2C/UART port), and the
          >> ability to control either 2 motors or two servos for locomotion, the new
          >> board has 21 I/O ports (9 analog and 12 digital) all broken out to 3 pin
          >> servo style headers + a dedicated i2c port + 2 dedicated motor ports, an
          >> accelerometer, a 7 segment LED display and a dedicated 5V regulator for
          >> the I/O ports so no worrying about a brownout when driving a bunch of
          >> servos while trying to take readings from 9 Sharp sensors or something
          >> crazy. Oh ya, and a general purpose push button because it was driving
          >> me crazy that the old micro-ore board didn't have one. ;-)
          >>
          >> Where the old micro-ore board was 35mm by 35mm, the new micro-ore2
          >> board... well... ok, it didn't shrink. If I had wanted to make it
          >> smaller, I would have had to go to a four layer board and I'm too cheap
          >> to shell out the $$$. ;-) So the new board is 35mm by 35mm also.
          >>
          >> Why go with 2 processors? Well, I started with just the 44 pin processor
          >> and then decided that I wanted to have the 7-segment LED for feedback. I
          >> also didn't want to give up any of my precious A/D ports for the
          >> accelerometer, thinking that I want to have more line sensors for a more
          >> brainy line follower. I searched for a 64 pin chip that was small enough
          >> but Microchip only has 64 pin QFN chips in their newer 3.3V devices. For
          >> ease of use I wanted to stay with 5V so I plunked down a second processor.
          >>
          >> So, what is the downside to this new board? Well, the motor driver only
          >> handles 1A per channel typical with 1.2A max where the old one was 1.2A
          >> per channel with a 3A max. The old one has a 14 week lead time on it and
          >> I figured that I don't normally drive a bigger motor on these boards
          >> anyhow.
          >>
          >> And the other downside... this thing definitely cannot be soldered by
          >> hand unless you have a hot-air gun. It has 5 QFN devices on it. QFN is
          >> short for 'Holy F*ck, how the hell do I solder this thing". Basically it
          >> doesn't have any pins, just some metal pads on the bottom of the
          >> package. 5 minutes in my reflow oven and it should be good to go though.
          >>
          >> Anyhow, if anyone has an interest in double-checking my design and
          >> making sure I didn't go off track somewhere I'd appreciate it. I'm
          >> likely going to order 2 or 3 of them from APCircuits next week if
          >> everything looks kosher.
          >>
          >> Aaron
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
        • Ken@Home
          Very nice. Your going to have an entire production shop any week now. How do you hold/align the stencils on a small system like that? Ken ... -- Ken L.
          Message 4 of 19 , Jan 3, 2010
            Very nice. Your going to have an entire production shop any week now.

            How do you hold/align the stencils on a small system like that?
            Ken

            Aaron Ramsey wrote:
            >
            >
            > I started with two mounting holes but had to throw one of them away when
            > I added the 7-segment led. <grin>
            >
            > You've got it right, I'm using the second UART on the 4011 to control
            > the pic18f. It can run at a couple megabits per second if needed
            > although I don't think that will be necessary with this design though.
            > The other UART comes out to a header. I could have used the I2C bus
            > instead but the i2c pins are shared with the in-circuit programming pins
            > on the 4011 and it looked easier to debug if I used the UART instead.
            >
            > I picked up a reflow oven this summer :
            > http://www.puhuit.com/main/page_products_t962_ir_ovenic_heater.html
            > <http://www.puhuit.com/main/page_products_t962_ir_ovenic_heater.html>
            >
            > I started off looking at hot-air guns for around $200 and it snowballed
            > from there a bit. ;-) A hot-air gun is good but can be a pain to get
            > everything just right without blowing away the components. I then
            > started looking at getting a toaster oven and modding it but the cost of
            > that was incredibly close to the actual commercial oven and involved
            > alot more screwing around to get running so I bit the bullet and spent
            > the $$$ on the real deal. They run around $400 on ebay. I paid around
            > $420 with shipping and 3 spare IR bulbs.
            >
            > The trick is getting the solder paste in the right place. I've using a
            > syringe for now but will likely end up using the Pololu stencil cutting
            > services at some point once I need to make more than a couple of boards
            > with it.
            >
            > http://www.pololu.com/catalog/product/446
            > <http://www.pololu.com/catalog/product/446>
            >
            > Aaron
            >
            > On 10-01-03 2:53 PM3-Jan-10, Ken@Home wrote:
            >> That's packing quite a bit on a single board...impressive.
            >> I guess with a single mounting hole on a board that small it isn't gong
            >> to be a problem, except possibly for the Z-axis of the accelerometer.
            >> That can be mitigated with properly sized rubber feet at the other
            >> corners to reduce movement.
            >>
            >> It looks like a pretty good (c/w kitchen sink) design, I don't see
            >> anything that jumps out. If I see it correctly, you are using the
            >> RS-232 channel for inter-processor comms (?)
            >>
            >> The reflow oven...is that a conversion/hack or ?
            >>
            >> Ken
            >>
            >> Aaron Ramsey wrote:
            >>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>> I just can't help myself... I love laying out PCBs. I was playing with
            >>> my latest line follower over the holidays. It uses the micro-ore...
            >>> actually the micro-ore was pretty much designed for line following back
            >>> when I made it in Oct 08. It works really well, but I got thinking that
            >>> I'd like more I/O to turn it into a more general purpose small robot
            >>> controller.<grin>
            >>>
            >>> So I spent a few days laying out a new board : Micro-ORE2!
            >>>
            >>> Schematics :
            >>> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
            > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf>
            >>> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
            > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf>>
            >>> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch
            > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch>
            >>> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch
            > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch>>
            >>>
            >>> Board layout:
            >>> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
            > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd>
            >>> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
            > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd>>
            >>> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
            > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png>
            >>> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
            > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png>>
            >>> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
            > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png>
            >>> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
            > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png>>
            >>> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png
            > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png>
            >>> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png
            > <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png>>
            >>>
            >>> Where the original board used an 18 pin DSPIC30F3012for a processor,
            >>> uore2 uses a 44 pin DSPIC30F4011 master processor and a 20 pin
            >>> PIC18F14K22 slave processor. That adds up to one a half times more the
            >>> horse power, two and a half times the memory and over three times the
            >>> I/O. Where the original board had 5 A/D ports, 5 digital ports (shared
            >>> with 3 optionally LEDs on the board and the I2C/UART port), and the
            >>> ability to control either 2 motors or two servos for locomotion, the new
            >>> board has 21 I/O ports (9 analog and 12 digital) all broken out to 3 pin
            >>> servo style headers + a dedicated i2c port + 2 dedicated motor ports, an
            >>> accelerometer, a 7 segment LED display and a dedicated 5V regulator for
            >>> the I/O ports so no worrying about a brownout when driving a bunch of
            >>> servos while trying to take readings from 9 Sharp sensors or something
            >>> crazy. Oh ya, and a general purpose push button because it was driving
            >>> me crazy that the old micro-ore board didn't have one. ;-)
            >>>
            >>> Where the old micro-ore board was 35mm by 35mm, the new micro-ore2
            >>> board... well... ok, it didn't shrink. If I had wanted to make it
            >>> smaller, I would have had to go to a four layer board and I'm too cheap
            >>> to shell out the $$$. ;-) So the new board is 35mm by 35mm also.
            >>>
            >>> Why go with 2 processors? Well, I started with just the 44 pin processor
            >>> and then decided that I wanted to have the 7-segment LED for feedback. I
            >>> also didn't want to give up any of my precious A/D ports for the
            >>> accelerometer, thinking that I want to have more line sensors for a more
            >>> brainy line follower. I searched for a 64 pin chip that was small enough
            >>> but Microchip only has 64 pin QFN chips in their newer 3.3V devices. For
            >>> ease of use I wanted to stay with 5V so I plunked down a second
            > processor.
            >>>
            >>> So, what is the downside to this new board? Well, the motor driver only
            >>> handles 1A per channel typical with 1.2A max where the old one was 1.2A
            >>> per channel with a 3A max. The old one has a 14 week lead time on it and
            >>> I figured that I don't normally drive a bigger motor on these boards
            >>> anyhow.
            >>>
            >>> And the other downside... this thing definitely cannot be soldered by
            >>> hand unless you have a hot-air gun. It has 5 QFN devices on it. QFN is
            >>> short for 'Holy F*ck, how the hell do I solder this thing". Basically it
            >>> doesn't have any pins, just some metal pads on the bottom of the
            >>> package. 5 minutes in my reflow oven and it should be good to go though.
            >>>
            >>> Anyhow, if anyone has an interest in double-checking my design and
            >>> making sure I didn't go off track somewhere I'd appreciate it. I'm
            >>> likely going to order 2 or 3 of them from APCircuits next week if
            >>> everything looks kosher.
            >>>
            >>> Aaron
            >>>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>
            >
            >

            --
            Ken L. McKinnon
            klmckinnon@...
          • Aaron Ramsey
            I m not sure how I ll end up holding the stencils yet. I think the plan will be to make a small jig out of older PCBs that I ve got sitting here to hold the
            Message 5 of 19 , Jan 3, 2010
              I'm not sure how I'll end up holding the stencils yet. I think the plan
              will be to make a small jig out of older PCBs that I've got sitting here
              to hold the PCB in place and have the stencil mounted on one edge there.

              Aaron


              On 10-01-03 4:45 PM3-Jan-10, Ken@Home wrote:
              > Very nice. Your going to have an entire production shop any week now.
              >
              > How do you hold/align the stencils on a small system like that?
              > Ken
              >
              > Aaron Ramsey wrote:
              >
              >>
              >>
              >> I started with two mounting holes but had to throw one of them away when
              >> I added the 7-segment led.<grin>
              >>
              >> You've got it right, I'm using the second UART on the 4011 to control
              >> the pic18f. It can run at a couple megabits per second if needed
              >> although I don't think that will be necessary with this design though.
              >> The other UART comes out to a header. I could have used the I2C bus
              >> instead but the i2c pins are shared with the in-circuit programming pins
              >> on the 4011 and it looked easier to debug if I used the UART instead.
              >>
              >> I picked up a reflow oven this summer :
              >> http://www.puhuit.com/main/page_products_t962_ir_ovenic_heater.html
              >> <http://www.puhuit.com/main/page_products_t962_ir_ovenic_heater.html>
              >>
              >> I started off looking at hot-air guns for around $200 and it snowballed
              >> from there a bit. ;-) A hot-air gun is good but can be a pain to get
              >> everything just right without blowing away the components. I then
              >> started looking at getting a toaster oven and modding it but the cost of
              >> that was incredibly close to the actual commercial oven and involved
              >> alot more screwing around to get running so I bit the bullet and spent
              >> the $$$ on the real deal. They run around $400 on ebay. I paid around
              >> $420 with shipping and 3 spare IR bulbs.
              >>
              >> The trick is getting the solder paste in the right place. I've using a
              >> syringe for now but will likely end up using the Pololu stencil cutting
              >> services at some point once I need to make more than a couple of boards
              >> with it.
              >>
              >> http://www.pololu.com/catalog/product/446
              >> <http://www.pololu.com/catalog/product/446>
              >>
              >> Aaron
              >>
              >> On 10-01-03 2:53 PM3-Jan-10, Ken@Home wrote:
              >>
              >>> That's packing quite a bit on a single board...impressive.
              >>> I guess with a single mounting hole on a board that small it isn't gong
              >>> to be a problem, except possibly for the Z-axis of the accelerometer.
              >>> That can be mitigated with properly sized rubber feet at the other
              >>> corners to reduce movement.
              >>>
              >>> It looks like a pretty good (c/w kitchen sink) design, I don't see
              >>> anything that jumps out. If I see it correctly, you are using the
              >>> RS-232 channel for inter-processor comms (?)
              >>>
              >>> The reflow oven...is that a conversion/hack or ?
              >>>
              >>> Ken
              >>>
              >>> Aaron Ramsey wrote:
              >>>
              >>>
              >>>>
              >>>> I just can't help myself... I love laying out PCBs. I was playing with
              >>>> my latest line follower over the holidays. It uses the micro-ore...
              >>>> actually the micro-ore was pretty much designed for line following back
              >>>> when I made it in Oct 08. It works really well, but I got thinking that
              >>>> I'd like more I/O to turn it into a more general purpose small robot
              >>>> controller.<grin>
              >>>>
              >>>> So I spent a few days laying out a new board : Micro-ORE2!
              >>>>
              >>>> Schematics :
              >>>> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
              >>>>
              >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf>
              >>
              >>>> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
              >>>>
              >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf>>
              >>
              >>>> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch
              >>>>
              >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch>
              >>
              >>>> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch
              >>>>
              >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch>>
              >>
              >>>> Board layout:
              >>>> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
              >>>>
              >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd>
              >>
              >>>> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
              >>>>
              >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd>>
              >>
              >>>> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
              >>>>
              >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png>
              >>
              >>>> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
              >>>>
              >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png>>
              >>
              >>>> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
              >>>>
              >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png>
              >>
              >>>> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
              >>>>
              >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png>>
              >>
              >>>> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png
              >>>>
              >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png>
              >>
              >>>> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png
              >>>>
              >> <http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png>>
              >>
              >>>> Where the original board used an 18 pin DSPIC30F3012for a processor,
              >>>> uore2 uses a 44 pin DSPIC30F4011 master processor and a 20 pin
              >>>> PIC18F14K22 slave processor. That adds up to one a half times more the
              >>>> horse power, two and a half times the memory and over three times the
              >>>> I/O. Where the original board had 5 A/D ports, 5 digital ports (shared
              >>>> with 3 optionally LEDs on the board and the I2C/UART port), and the
              >>>> ability to control either 2 motors or two servos for locomotion, the new
              >>>> board has 21 I/O ports (9 analog and 12 digital) all broken out to 3 pin
              >>>> servo style headers + a dedicated i2c port + 2 dedicated motor ports, an
              >>>> accelerometer, a 7 segment LED display and a dedicated 5V regulator for
              >>>> the I/O ports so no worrying about a brownout when driving a bunch of
              >>>> servos while trying to take readings from 9 Sharp sensors or something
              >>>> crazy. Oh ya, and a general purpose push button because it was driving
              >>>> me crazy that the old micro-ore board didn't have one. ;-)
              >>>>
              >>>> Where the old micro-ore board was 35mm by 35mm, the new micro-ore2
              >>>> board... well... ok, it didn't shrink. If I had wanted to make it
              >>>> smaller, I would have had to go to a four layer board and I'm too cheap
              >>>> to shell out the $$$. ;-) So the new board is 35mm by 35mm also.
              >>>>
              >>>> Why go with 2 processors? Well, I started with just the 44 pin processor
              >>>> and then decided that I wanted to have the 7-segment LED for feedback. I
              >>>> also didn't want to give up any of my precious A/D ports for the
              >>>> accelerometer, thinking that I want to have more line sensors for a more
              >>>> brainy line follower. I searched for a 64 pin chip that was small enough
              >>>> but Microchip only has 64 pin QFN chips in their newer 3.3V devices. For
              >>>> ease of use I wanted to stay with 5V so I plunked down a second
              >>>>
              >> processor.
              >>
              >>>> So, what is the downside to this new board? Well, the motor driver only
              >>>> handles 1A per channel typical with 1.2A max where the old one was 1.2A
              >>>> per channel with a 3A max. The old one has a 14 week lead time on it and
              >>>> I figured that I don't normally drive a bigger motor on these boards
              >>>> anyhow.
              >>>>
              >>>> And the other downside... this thing definitely cannot be soldered by
              >>>> hand unless you have a hot-air gun. It has 5 QFN devices on it. QFN is
              >>>> short for 'Holy F*ck, how the hell do I solder this thing". Basically it
              >>>> doesn't have any pins, just some metal pads on the bottom of the
              >>>> package. 5 minutes in my reflow oven and it should be good to go though.
              >>>>
              >>>> Anyhow, if anyone has an interest in double-checking my design and
              >>>> making sure I didn't go off track somewhere I'd appreciate it. I'm
              >>>> likely going to order 2 or 3 of them from APCircuits next week if
              >>>> everything looks kosher.
              >>>>
              >>>> Aaron
              >>>>
              >>>>
              >>>>
              >>>>
              >>>
              >>
              >>
              >
            • Jon Hylands
              On Sun, 03 Jan 2010 16:54:25 -0500, Aaron Ramsey ... I do surface mount with Pololu stencils all the time. The first minute or so of this video:
              Message 6 of 19 , Jan 3, 2010
                On Sun, 03 Jan 2010 16:54:25 -0500, Aaron Ramsey
                <aaronsmaillistaccount@...> wrote:

                >I'm not sure how I'll end up holding the stencils yet. I think the plan
                >will be to make a small jig out of older PCBs that I've got sitting here
                >to hold the PCB in place and have the stencil mounted on one edge there.

                I do surface mount with Pololu stencils all the time.

                The first minute or so of this video:

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_NIY8GyQ90

                shows how I do it...

                Later,
                Jon
              • Ron Clough
                WOW :) Looks good. The only thing I would add is a 3-axis rate gyro like InvenSense ITG-3200 :) http://invensense.com/mems/gyro/itg3200.html No extra
                Message 7 of 19 , Jan 3, 2010
                  WOW :) Looks good. The only thing I would add is a 3-axis rate gyro like InvenSense ITG-3200 :) http://invensense.com/mems/gyro/itg3200.html
                  No extra PIC pins required . . . it connects via the I2C bus.
                  RonC

                  On 2010-01-02, at 10:35 PM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:

                  > I just can't help myself... I love laying out PCBs. I was playing with
                  > my latest line follower over the holidays. It uses the micro-ore...
                  > actually the micro-ore was pretty much designed for line following back
                  > when I made it in Oct 08. It works really well, but I got thinking that
                  > I'd like more I/O to turn it into a more general purpose small robot
                  > controller. <grin>
                  >
                  > So I spent a few days laying out a new board : Micro-ORE2!
                  >
                  > Schematics :
                  > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
                  > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch
                  >
                  > Board layout:
                  > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
                  > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
                  > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
                  > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png
                  >
                  > Where the original board used an 18 pin DSPIC30F3012for a processor,
                  > uore2 uses a 44 pin DSPIC30F4011 master processor and a 20 pin
                  > PIC18F14K22 slave processor. That adds up to one a half times more the
                  > horse power, two and a half times the memory and over three times the
                  > I/O. Where the original board had 5 A/D ports, 5 digital ports (shared
                  > with 3 optionally LEDs on the board and the I2C/UART port), and the
                  > ability to control either 2 motors or two servos for locomotion, the new
                  > board has 21 I/O ports (9 analog and 12 digital) all broken out to 3 pin
                  > servo style headers + a dedicated i2c port + 2 dedicated motor ports, an
                  > accelerometer, a 7 segment LED display and a dedicated 5V regulator for
                  > the I/O ports so no worrying about a brownout when driving a bunch of
                  > servos while trying to take readings from 9 Sharp sensors or something
                  > crazy. Oh ya, and a general purpose push button because it was driving
                  > me crazy that the old micro-ore board didn't have one. ;-)
                  >
                  > Where the old micro-ore board was 35mm by 35mm, the new micro-ore2
                  > board... well... ok, it didn't shrink. If I had wanted to make it
                  > smaller, I would have had to go to a four layer board and I'm too cheap
                  > to shell out the $$$. ;-) So the new board is 35mm by 35mm also.
                  >
                  > Why go with 2 processors? Well, I started with just the 44 pin processor
                  > and then decided that I wanted to have the 7-segment LED for feedback. I
                  > also didn't want to give up any of my precious A/D ports for the
                  > accelerometer, thinking that I want to have more line sensors for a more
                  > brainy line follower. I searched for a 64 pin chip that was small enough
                  > but Microchip only has 64 pin QFN chips in their newer 3.3V devices. For
                  > ease of use I wanted to stay with 5V so I plunked down a second processor.
                  >
                  > So, what is the downside to this new board? Well, the motor driver only
                  > handles 1A per channel typical with 1.2A max where the old one was 1.2A
                  > per channel with a 3A max. The old one has a 14 week lead time on it and
                  > I figured that I don't normally drive a bigger motor on these boards
                  > anyhow.
                  >
                  > And the other downside... this thing definitely cannot be soldered by
                  > hand unless you have a hot-air gun. It has 5 QFN devices on it. QFN is
                  > short for 'Holy F*ck, how the hell do I solder this thing". Basically it
                  > doesn't have any pins, just some metal pads on the bottom of the
                  > package. 5 minutes in my reflow oven and it should be good to go though.
                  >
                  > Anyhow, if anyone has an interest in double-checking my design and
                  > making sure I didn't go off track somewhere I'd appreciate it. I'm
                  > likely going to order 2 or 3 of them from APCircuits next week if
                  > everything looks kosher.
                  >
                  > Aaron
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > ORE_bits-unsubscribe@...
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Aaron Ramsey
                  3.3V only though. The size is nice.... I ve got a nice spot where a 5mm by 5mm chip could have fit. Maybe on the next one. Aaron
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jan 3, 2010
                    3.3V only though. The size is nice.... I've got a nice spot where a 5mm
                    by 5mm chip could have fit. Maybe on the next one.

                    Aaron


                    On 10-01-03 6:42 PM3-Jan-10, Ron Clough wrote:
                    > WOW :) Looks good. The only thing I would add is a 3-axis rate gyro like InvenSense ITG-3200 :) http://invensense.com/mems/gyro/itg3200.html
                    > No extra PIC pins required . . . it connects via the I2C bus.
                    > RonC
                    >
                    > On 2010-01-02, at 10:35 PM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >> I just can't help myself... I love laying out PCBs. I was playing with
                    >> my latest line follower over the holidays. It uses the micro-ore...
                    >> actually the micro-ore was pretty much designed for line following back
                    >> when I made it in Oct 08. It works really well, but I got thinking that
                    >> I'd like more I/O to turn it into a more general purpose small robot
                    >> controller.<grin>
                    >>
                    >> So I spent a few days laying out a new board : Micro-ORE2!
                    >>
                    >> Schematics :
                    >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
                    >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch
                    >>
                    >> Board layout:
                    >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
                    >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
                    >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
                    >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png
                    >>
                    >> Where the original board used an 18 pin DSPIC30F3012for a processor,
                    >> uore2 uses a 44 pin DSPIC30F4011 master processor and a 20 pin
                    >> PIC18F14K22 slave processor. That adds up to one a half times more the
                    >> horse power, two and a half times the memory and over three times the
                    >> I/O. Where the original board had 5 A/D ports, 5 digital ports (shared
                    >> with 3 optionally LEDs on the board and the I2C/UART port), and the
                    >> ability to control either 2 motors or two servos for locomotion, the new
                    >> board has 21 I/O ports (9 analog and 12 digital) all broken out to 3 pin
                    >> servo style headers + a dedicated i2c port + 2 dedicated motor ports, an
                    >> accelerometer, a 7 segment LED display and a dedicated 5V regulator for
                    >> the I/O ports so no worrying about a brownout when driving a bunch of
                    >> servos while trying to take readings from 9 Sharp sensors or something
                    >> crazy. Oh ya, and a general purpose push button because it was driving
                    >> me crazy that the old micro-ore board didn't have one. ;-)
                    >>
                    >> Where the old micro-ore board was 35mm by 35mm, the new micro-ore2
                    >> board... well... ok, it didn't shrink. If I had wanted to make it
                    >> smaller, I would have had to go to a four layer board and I'm too cheap
                    >> to shell out the $$$. ;-) So the new board is 35mm by 35mm also.
                    >>
                    >> Why go with 2 processors? Well, I started with just the 44 pin processor
                    >> and then decided that I wanted to have the 7-segment LED for feedback. I
                    >> also didn't want to give up any of my precious A/D ports for the
                    >> accelerometer, thinking that I want to have more line sensors for a more
                    >> brainy line follower. I searched for a 64 pin chip that was small enough
                    >> but Microchip only has 64 pin QFN chips in their newer 3.3V devices. For
                    >> ease of use I wanted to stay with 5V so I plunked down a second processor.
                    >>
                    >> So, what is the downside to this new board? Well, the motor driver only
                    >> handles 1A per channel typical with 1.2A max where the old one was 1.2A
                    >> per channel with a 3A max. The old one has a 14 week lead time on it and
                    >> I figured that I don't normally drive a bigger motor on these boards
                    >> anyhow.
                    >>
                    >> And the other downside... this thing definitely cannot be soldered by
                    >> hand unless you have a hot-air gun. It has 5 QFN devices on it. QFN is
                    >> short for 'Holy F*ck, how the hell do I solder this thing". Basically it
                    >> doesn't have any pins, just some metal pads on the bottom of the
                    >> package. 5 minutes in my reflow oven and it should be good to go though.
                    >>
                    >> Anyhow, if anyone has an interest in double-checking my design and
                    >> making sure I didn't go off track somewhere I'd appreciate it. I'm
                    >> likely going to order 2 or 3 of them from APCircuits next week if
                    >> everything looks kosher.
                    >>
                    >> Aaron
                    >>
                    >>
                  • Aaron Ramsey
                    ... Looks like a piece of cake. ;-) How many of them do you have to do before it looks that easy? I went ahead and ordered stencils for the PCBs. Just
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jan 3, 2010
                      On 10-01-03 5:19 PM3-Jan-10, Jon Hylands wrote:
                      > On Sun, 03 Jan 2010 16:54:25 -0500, Aaron Ramsey
                      > <aaronsmaillistaccount@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >> I'm not sure how I'll end up holding the stencils yet. I think the plan
                      >> will be to make a small jig out of older PCBs that I've got sitting here
                      >> to hold the PCB in place and have the stencil mounted on one edge there.
                      >>
                      > I do surface mount with Pololu stencils all the time.
                      >
                      > The first minute or so of this video:
                      >
                      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_NIY8GyQ90
                      >
                      > shows how I do it...
                      >
                      Looks like a piece of cake. ;-) How many of them do you have to do
                      before it looks that easy? <grin>

                      I went ahead and ordered stencils for the PCBs. Just about crapped my
                      pants at the price though. 4 PCBs from APCircuits was $68CAN + $25CAN
                      next day shipping via fedex. 1 stencil from Pololu was $29US for the
                      mylar + $31US for shipping (USPS express). Ouch! Not even a courier! I
                      panelized the top and bottom paste layers onto the same panel, but I
                      think that next time I'd better order more than a single piece of mylar
                      to make up for that crazy shipping charge. Having it shipped with a
                      courier was almost $100.

                      Still though, a metal stencil runs into the hundreds of dollars so still
                      a good deal. Assuming I don't accidentally slice it up with my razor
                      blade on the first go. ;-)

                      Aaron
                    • Sebastien Bailard
                      ... Would it help to use registration pins through the board s existing fastener holes, lining up with holes in the stencil? The pins would stick up out of a
                      Message 10 of 19 , Jan 3, 2010
                        On January 3, 2010 10:59:12 pm Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                        > On 10-01-03 5:19 PM3-Jan-10, Jon Hylands wrote:
                        > > On Sun, 03 Jan 2010 16:54:25 -0500, Aaron Ramsey
                        > > <aaronsmaillistaccount@...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > >> I'm not sure how I'll end up holding the stencils yet. I think the plan
                        > >> will be to make a small jig out of older PCBs that I've got sitting here
                        > >> to hold the PCB in place and have the stencil mounted on one edge there.
                        > >>
                        > > I do surface mount with Pololu stencils all the time.
                        > >
                        > > The first minute or so of this video:
                        > >
                        > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_NIY8GyQ90
                        > >
                        > > shows how I do it...
                        > >
                        > Looks like a piece of cake. ;-) How many of them do you have to do
                        > before it looks that easy? <grin>
                        >
                        Would it help to use registration pins through the board's existing fastener holes, lining up with holes in the stencil? The pins would stick up out of a small bit of scrap wood, to accept pcbs and stencils.

                        > I went ahead and ordered stencils for the PCBs. Just about crapped my
                        > pants at the price though. 4 PCBs from APCircuits was $68CAN + $25CAN
                        > next day shipping via fedex. 1 stencil from Pololu was $29US for the
                        > mylar + $31US for shipping (USPS express). Ouch! Not even a courier! I
                        > panelized the top and bottom paste layers onto the same panel, but I
                        > think that next time I'd better order more than a single piece of mylar
                        > to make up for that crazy shipping charge. Having it shipped with a
                        > courier was almost $100.
                        >
                        > Still though, a metal stencil runs into the hundreds of dollars so still
                        > a good deal. Assuming I don't accidentally slice it up with my razor
                        > blade on the first go. ;-)
                        >
                        > Aaron
                        >

                        Any interest in co-owning or using a hypothetical laser cutter administrated by and located at Art Engine? I've been thinking of suggesting it to Ryan Stec as a foundation to build a local non-profit fab lab on.

                        That's assuming there's demand. I haven't gone over the financials or the logistics (lease to own at $300/month)?, but I imagine people would pay CAD100-200 for a share, and a token use fee, or $0 for a share, and a non-token use fee*. Candidate users: ORE, Hackerspacers, RepRappers, Artists.

                        Also, can't you _mill_ a stencil?

                        -Sebastien
                        *Say, $31 for shipping.
                      • Jon Hylands
                        On Mon, 4 Jan 2010 00:53:43 -0500, Sebastien Bailard ... Not really - its pretty simple to just hold it in place. If you screw it up, you clean the stencil,
                        Message 11 of 19 , Jan 4, 2010
                          On Mon, 4 Jan 2010 00:53:43 -0500, Sebastien Bailard
                          <penguin@...> wrote:

                          >Would it help to use registration pins through the board's existing fastener holes, lining up with holes in the stencil? The pins would stick up out of a small bit of scrap wood, to accept pcbs and stencils.

                          Not really - its pretty simple to just hold it in place. If you screw
                          it up, you clean the stencil, wipe all the solder paste off, and try
                          again.

                          >Any interest in co-owning or using a hypothetical laser cutter administrated by and located at Art Engine? I've been thinking of suggesting it to Ryan Stec as a foundation to build a local non-profit fab lab on.
                          >
                          >That's assuming there's demand. I haven't gone over the financials or the logistics (lease to own at $300/month)?, but I imagine people would pay CAD100-200 for a share, and a token use fee, or $0 for a share, and a non-token use fee*. Candidate users: ORE, Hackerspacers, RepRappers, Artists.

                          I would definitely buy into that for either version.

                          >Also, can't you _mill_ a stencil?

                          Not really (at least not with hobby level tools) - the whole point of
                          using a stencil is being able to use fine pitch components (0.5 mm).

                          I suppose if you were cutting your stencil out of very thin aluminum,
                          it might work. You would have to use indexing holes in that case,
                          since you wouldn't be able to see through the stencil. But it would
                          have to be very thin - think 0.005" or so.

                          Later,
                          Jon
                        • Aaron Ramsey
                          ... I d be interested in that also. Aaron
                          Message 12 of 19 , Jan 4, 2010
                            On 10-01-04 7:27 AM4-Jan-10, Jon Hylands wrote:
                            > On Mon, 4 Jan 2010 00:53:43 -0500, Sebastien Bailard
                            > <penguin@...> wrote:
                            >> Any interest in co-owning or using a hypothetical laser cutter administrated by and located at Art Engine? I've been thinking of suggesting it to Ryan Stec as a foundation to build a local non-profit fab lab on.
                            >>
                            >> That's assuming there's demand. I haven't gone over the financials or the logistics (lease to own at $300/month)?, but I imagine people would pay CAD100-200 for a share, and a token use fee, or $0 for a share, and a non-token use fee*. Candidate users: ORE, Hackerspacers, RepRappers, Artists.
                            >>
                            > I would definitely buy into that for either version.
                            >
                            >
                            I'd be interested in that also.

                            Aaron
                          • Aaron Ramsey
                            Sweet... PCBs shipped out today! APCircuits in Alberta is awesome. Stencil for the solderpaste shipped out from Pololu on Monday! Samples from Microchip for
                            Message 13 of 19 , Jan 6, 2010
                              Sweet... PCBs shipped out today! APCircuits in Alberta is awesome.
                              Stencil for the solderpaste shipped out from Pololu on Monday! Samples
                              from Microchip for the processors shipped yesterday!

                              A quick order from Digikey for a few parts that I don't have and I'm
                              good to go, I think. Unlikely that the stencil will show up before
                              monday though for the meeting (Jan 11th at Algonquin college in the new
                              room T102, same as December) but at least I'll have a few PCBs to show
                              off. <grin>

                              Aaron


                              On 10-01-02 10:35 PM2-Jan-10, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                              > I just can't help myself... I love laying out PCBs. I was playing with
                              > my latest line follower over the holidays. It uses the micro-ore...
                              > actually the micro-ore was pretty much designed for line following back
                              > when I made it in Oct 08. It works really well, but I got thinking that
                              > I'd like more I/O to turn it into a more general purpose small robot
                              > controller.<grin>
                              >
                              > So I spent a few days laying out a new board : Micro-ORE2!
                              >
                              > Schematics :
                              > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
                              > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch
                              >
                              > Board layout:
                              > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
                              > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
                              > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
                              > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png
                              >
                              > Where the original board used an 18 pin DSPIC30F3012for a processor,
                              > uore2 uses a 44 pin DSPIC30F4011 master processor and a 20 pin
                              > PIC18F14K22 slave processor. That adds up to one a half times more the
                              > horse power, two and a half times the memory and over three times the
                              > I/O. Where the original board had 5 A/D ports, 5 digital ports (shared
                              > with 3 optionally LEDs on the board and the I2C/UART port), and the
                              > ability to control either 2 motors or two servos for locomotion, the new
                              > board has 21 I/O ports (9 analog and 12 digital) all broken out to 3 pin
                              > servo style headers + a dedicated i2c port + 2 dedicated motor ports, an
                              > accelerometer, a 7 segment LED display and a dedicated 5V regulator for
                              > the I/O ports so no worrying about a brownout when driving a bunch of
                              > servos while trying to take readings from 9 Sharp sensors or something
                              > crazy. Oh ya, and a general purpose push button because it was driving
                              > me crazy that the old micro-ore board didn't have one. ;-)
                              >
                              > Where the old micro-ore board was 35mm by 35mm, the new micro-ore2
                              > board... well... ok, it didn't shrink. If I had wanted to make it
                              > smaller, I would have had to go to a four layer board and I'm too cheap
                              > to shell out the $$$. ;-) So the new board is 35mm by 35mm also.
                              >
                              > Why go with 2 processors? Well, I started with just the 44 pin processor
                              > and then decided that I wanted to have the 7-segment LED for feedback. I
                              > also didn't want to give up any of my precious A/D ports for the
                              > accelerometer, thinking that I want to have more line sensors for a more
                              > brainy line follower. I searched for a 64 pin chip that was small enough
                              > but Microchip only has 64 pin QFN chips in their newer 3.3V devices. For
                              > ease of use I wanted to stay with 5V so I plunked down a second processor.
                              >
                              > So, what is the downside to this new board? Well, the motor driver only
                              > handles 1A per channel typical with 1.2A max where the old one was 1.2A
                              > per channel with a 3A max. The old one has a 14 week lead time on it and
                              > I figured that I don't normally drive a bigger motor on these boards
                              > anyhow.
                              >
                              > And the other downside... this thing definitely cannot be soldered by
                              > hand unless you have a hot-air gun. It has 5 QFN devices on it. QFN is
                              > short for 'Holy F*ck, how the hell do I solder this thing". Basically it
                              > doesn't have any pins, just some metal pads on the bottom of the
                              > package. 5 minutes in my reflow oven and it should be good to go though.
                              >
                              > Anyhow, if anyone has an interest in double-checking my design and
                              > making sure I didn't go off track somewhere I'd appreciate it. I'm
                              > likely going to order 2 or 3 of them from APCircuits next week if
                              > everything looks kosher.
                              >
                              > Aaron
                              >
                              >
                            • Andrew Plumb
                              Hey Aaron, Do you have Eagle installed on a laptop that you could bring along to the meeting to quickly run through your APCircuits-targeted flow? Thanks!
                              Message 14 of 19 , Jan 7, 2010
                                Hey Aaron,

                                Do you have Eagle installed on a laptop that you could bring along to
                                the meeting to quickly run through your APCircuits-targeted flow?

                                Thanks!

                                Andrew.

                                On 6-Jan-10, at 6:41 PM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:

                                > Sweet... PCBs shipped out today! APCircuits in Alberta is awesome.
                                > Stencil for the solderpaste shipped out from Pololu on Monday! Samples
                                > from Microchip for the processors shipped yesterday!
                                >
                                > A quick order from Digikey for a few parts that I don't have and I'm
                                > good to go, I think. Unlikely that the stencil will show up before
                                > monday though for the meeting (Jan 11th at Algonquin college in the
                                > new
                                > room T102, same as December) but at least I'll have a few PCBs to show
                                > off. <grin>
                                >
                                > Aaron
                                >
                                >
                                > On 10-01-02 10:35 PM2-Jan-10, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                >> I just can't help myself... I love laying out PCBs. I was playing
                                >> with
                                >> my latest line follower over the holidays. It uses the micro-ore...
                                >> actually the micro-ore was pretty much designed for line following
                                >> back
                                >> when I made it in Oct 08. It works really well, but I got thinking
                                >> that
                                >> I'd like more I/O to turn it into a more general purpose small robot
                                >> controller.<grin>
                                >>
                                >> So I spent a few days laying out a new board : Micro-ORE2!
                                >>
                                >> Schematics :
                                >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
                                >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch
                                >>
                                >> Board layout:
                                >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
                                >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
                                >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
                                >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png
                                >>
                                >> Where the original board used an 18 pin DSPIC30F3012for a processor,
                                >> uore2 uses a 44 pin DSPIC30F4011 master processor and a 20 pin
                                >> PIC18F14K22 slave processor. That adds up to one a half times more
                                >> the
                                >> horse power, two and a half times the memory and over three times the
                                >> I/O. Where the original board had 5 A/D ports, 5 digital ports
                                >> (shared
                                >> with 3 optionally LEDs on the board and the I2C/UART port), and the
                                >> ability to control either 2 motors or two servos for locomotion,
                                >> the new
                                >> board has 21 I/O ports (9 analog and 12 digital) all broken out to
                                >> 3 pin
                                >> servo style headers + a dedicated i2c port + 2 dedicated motor
                                >> ports, an
                                >> accelerometer, a 7 segment LED display and a dedicated 5V regulator
                                >> for
                                >> the I/O ports so no worrying about a brownout when driving a bunch of
                                >> servos while trying to take readings from 9 Sharp sensors or
                                >> something
                                >> crazy. Oh ya, and a general purpose push button because it was
                                >> driving
                                >> me crazy that the old micro-ore board didn't have one. ;-)
                                >>
                                >> Where the old micro-ore board was 35mm by 35mm, the new micro-ore2
                                >> board... well... ok, it didn't shrink. If I had wanted to make it
                                >> smaller, I would have had to go to a four layer board and I'm too
                                >> cheap
                                >> to shell out the $$$. ;-) So the new board is 35mm by 35mm also.
                                >>
                                >> Why go with 2 processors? Well, I started with just the 44 pin
                                >> processor
                                >> and then decided that I wanted to have the 7-segment LED for
                                >> feedback. I
                                >> also didn't want to give up any of my precious A/D ports for the
                                >> accelerometer, thinking that I want to have more line sensors for a
                                >> more
                                >> brainy line follower. I searched for a 64 pin chip that was small
                                >> enough
                                >> but Microchip only has 64 pin QFN chips in their newer 3.3V
                                >> devices. For
                                >> ease of use I wanted to stay with 5V so I plunked down a second
                                >> processor.
                                >>
                                >> So, what is the downside to this new board? Well, the motor driver
                                >> only
                                >> handles 1A per channel typical with 1.2A max where the old one was
                                >> 1.2A
                                >> per channel with a 3A max. The old one has a 14 week lead time on
                                >> it and
                                >> I figured that I don't normally drive a bigger motor on these boards
                                >> anyhow.
                                >>
                                >> And the other downside... this thing definitely cannot be soldered by
                                >> hand unless you have a hot-air gun. It has 5 QFN devices on it. QFN
                                >> is
                                >> short for 'Holy F*ck, how the hell do I solder this thing".
                                >> Basically it
                                >> doesn't have any pins, just some metal pads on the bottom of the
                                >> package. 5 minutes in my reflow oven and it should be good to go
                                >> though.
                                >>
                                >> Anyhow, if anyone has an interest in double-checking my design and
                                >> making sure I didn't go off track somewhere I'd appreciate it. I'm
                                >> likely going to order 2 or 3 of them from APCircuits next week if
                                >> everything looks kosher.
                                >>
                                >> Aaron
                                >>
                                >>
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > ------------------------------------
                                >
                                > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                                > ORE_bits-unsubscribe@...
                                >
                                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                >
                                >
                                >

                                --

                                "The future is already here. It's just not very evenly distributed"
                                -- William Gibson
                              • Aaron Ramsey
                                Sure, no problem. I have Eagle installed on just about every computer I own. If you (or anyone else) ever needs schematics or PCBs to be reviewed, I m
                                Message 15 of 19 , Jan 7, 2010
                                  Sure, no problem. I have Eagle installed on just about every computer I own. <grin>

                                  If you (or anyone else) ever needs schematics or PCBs to be reviewed, I'm always up for that too.

                                  Aaron


                                  On Thu, Jan 7, 2010 at 10:04 AM, Andrew Plumb <andrew@...> wrote:
                                  Hey Aaron,

                                  Do you have Eagle installed on a laptop that you could bring along to
                                  the meeting to quickly run through your APCircuits-targeted flow?

                                  Thanks!

                                  Andrew.

                                  On 6-Jan-10, at 6:41 PM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:

                                  > Sweet... PCBs shipped out today! APCircuits in Alberta is awesome.
                                  > Stencil for the solderpaste shipped out from Pololu on Monday! Samples
                                  > from Microchip for the processors shipped yesterday!
                                  >
                                  >  A quick order from Digikey for a few parts that I don't have and I'm
                                  > good to go, I think. Unlikely that the stencil will show up before
                                  > monday though for the meeting (Jan 11th at Algonquin college in the
                                  > new
                                  > room T102, same as December) but at least I'll have a few PCBs to show
                                  > off. <grin>
                                  >
                                  > Aaron
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > On 10-01-02 10:35 PM2-Jan-10, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                  >> I just can't help myself... I love laying out PCBs. I was playing
                                  >> with
                                  >> my latest line follower over the holidays. It uses the micro-ore...
                                  >> actually the micro-ore was pretty much designed for line following
                                  >> back
                                  >> when I made it in Oct 08. It works really well, but I got thinking
                                  >> that
                                  >> I'd like more I/O to turn it into a more general purpose small robot
                                  >> controller.<grin>
                                  >>
                                  >> So I spent a few days laying out a new board : Micro-ORE2!
                                  >>
                                  >> Schematics :
                                  >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
                                  >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch
                                  >>
                                  >> Board layout:
                                  >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
                                  >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
                                  >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
                                  >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png
                                  >>
                                  >> Where the original board used an 18 pin DSPIC30F3012for a processor,
                                  >> uore2 uses a 44 pin DSPIC30F4011 master processor and a 20 pin
                                  >> PIC18F14K22 slave processor. That adds up to one a half times more
                                  >> the
                                  >> horse power, two and a half times the memory and over three times the
                                  >> I/O. Where the original board had 5 A/D ports, 5 digital ports
                                  >> (shared
                                  >> with 3 optionally LEDs on the board and the I2C/UART port), and the
                                  >> ability to control either 2 motors or two servos for locomotion,
                                  >> the new
                                  >> board has 21 I/O ports (9 analog and 12 digital) all broken out to
                                  >> 3 pin
                                  >> servo style headers + a dedicated i2c port + 2 dedicated motor
                                  >> ports, an
                                  >> accelerometer, a 7 segment LED display and a dedicated 5V regulator
                                  >> for
                                  >> the I/O ports so no worrying about a brownout when driving a bunch of
                                  >> servos while trying to take readings from 9 Sharp sensors or
                                  >> something
                                  >> crazy. Oh ya, and a general purpose push button because it was
                                  >> driving
                                  >> me crazy that the old micro-ore board didn't have one. ;-)
                                  >>
                                  >> Where the old micro-ore board was 35mm by 35mm, the new micro-ore2
                                  >> board... well... ok, it didn't shrink. If I had wanted to make it
                                  >> smaller, I would have had to go to a four layer board and I'm too
                                  >> cheap
                                  >> to shell out the $$$. ;-) So the new board is 35mm by 35mm also.
                                  >>
                                  >> Why go with 2 processors? Well, I started with just the 44 pin
                                  >> processor
                                  >> and then decided that I wanted to have the 7-segment LED for
                                  >> feedback. I
                                  >> also didn't want to give up any of my precious A/D ports for the
                                  >> accelerometer, thinking that I want to have more line sensors for a
                                  >> more
                                  >> brainy line follower. I searched for a 64 pin chip that was small
                                  >> enough
                                  >> but Microchip only has 64 pin QFN chips in their newer 3.3V
                                  >> devices. For
                                  >> ease of use I wanted to stay with 5V so I plunked down a second
                                  >> processor.
                                  >>
                                  >> So, what is the downside to this new board? Well, the motor driver
                                  >> only
                                  >> handles 1A per channel typical with 1.2A max where the old one was
                                  >> 1.2A
                                  >> per channel with a 3A max. The old one has a 14 week lead time on
                                  >> it and
                                  >> I figured that I don't normally drive a bigger motor on these boards
                                  >> anyhow.
                                  >>
                                  >> And the other downside... this thing definitely cannot be soldered by
                                  >> hand unless you have a hot-air gun. It has 5 QFN devices on it. QFN
                                  >> is
                                  >> short for 'Holy F*ck, how the hell do I solder this thing".
                                  >> Basically it
                                  >> doesn't have any pins, just some metal pads on the bottom of the
                                  >> package. 5 minutes in my reflow oven and it should be good to go
                                  >> though.
                                  >>
                                  >> Anyhow, if anyone has an interest in double-checking my design and
                                  >> making sure I didn't go off track somewhere I'd appreciate it. I'm
                                  >> likely going to order 2 or 3 of them from APCircuits next week if
                                  >> everything looks kosher.
                                  >>
                                  >> Aaron
                                  >>
                                  >>
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > ------------------------------------
                                  >
                                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                                  > ORE_bits-unsubscribe@...
                                  >
                                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >

                                  --

                                  "The future is already here.  It's just not very evenly distributed"
                                  -- William Gibson





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                                • Andrew Plumb
                                  Excellent! I ll definitely take you up on the review offer. My pipe cleaner design is a heater control circuit for my Makerbot s heated build platform I m
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Jan 7, 2010
                                    Excellent! I'll definitely take you up on the review offer.

                                    My "pipe cleaner" design is a heater control circuit for my Makerbot's
                                    heated build platform I'm working on. I've made it jumper-configurable
                                    so it can use either the TI TMP101 (I2C control) or TMP300 (resistor-
                                    programmable) for temperature sensing. The designs are GPL'd to be
                                    compatible with the rest of the RepRap/Makerbot or any other project
                                    that chooses to embrace+extend it.

                                    Should I just e-mail you the .sch and .brd files and go from there?

                                    Andrew.

                                    On 7-Jan-10, at 10:09 AM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:

                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Sure, no problem. I have Eagle installed on just about every
                                    > computer I own. <grin>
                                    >
                                    > If you (or anyone else) ever needs schematics or PCBs to be
                                    > reviewed, I'm always up for that too.
                                    >
                                    > Aaron
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > On Thu, Jan 7, 2010 at 10:04 AM, Andrew Plumb <andrew@...>
                                    > wrote:
                                    > Hey Aaron,
                                    >
                                    > Do you have Eagle installed on a laptop that you could bring along to
                                    > the meeting to quickly run through your APCircuits-targeted flow?
                                    >
                                    > Thanks!
                                    >
                                    > Andrew.
                                    >
                                    > On 6-Jan-10, at 6:41 PM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                    >
                                    > > Sweet... PCBs shipped out today! APCircuits in Alberta is awesome.
                                    > > Stencil for the solderpaste shipped out from Pololu on Monday!
                                    > Samples
                                    > > from Microchip for the processors shipped yesterday!
                                    > >
                                    > > A quick order from Digikey for a few parts that I don't have and
                                    > I'm
                                    > > good to go, I think. Unlikely that the stencil will show up before
                                    > > monday though for the meeting (Jan 11th at Algonquin college in the
                                    > > new
                                    > > room T102, same as December) but at least I'll have a few PCBs to
                                    > show
                                    > > off. <grin>
                                    > >
                                    > > Aaron
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > On 10-01-02 10:35 PM2-Jan-10, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                    > >> I just can't help myself... I love laying out PCBs. I was playing
                                    > >> with
                                    > >> my latest line follower over the holidays. It uses the micro-ore...
                                    > >> actually the micro-ore was pretty much designed for line following
                                    > >> back
                                    > >> when I made it in Oct 08. It works really well, but I got thinking
                                    > >> that
                                    > >> I'd like more I/O to turn it into a more general purpose small
                                    > robot
                                    > >> controller.<grin>
                                    > >>
                                    > >> So I spent a few days laying out a new board : Micro-ORE2!
                                    > >>
                                    > >> Schematics :
                                    > >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
                                    > >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch
                                    > >>
                                    > >> Board layout:
                                    > >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
                                    > >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
                                    > >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
                                    > >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png
                                    > >>
                                    > >> Where the original board used an 18 pin DSPIC30F3012for a
                                    > processor,
                                    > >> uore2 uses a 44 pin DSPIC30F4011 master processor and a 20 pin
                                    > >> PIC18F14K22 slave processor. That adds up to one a half times more
                                    > >> the
                                    > >> horse power, two and a half times the memory and over three times
                                    > the
                                    > >> I/O. Where the original board had 5 A/D ports, 5 digital ports
                                    > >> (shared
                                    > >> with 3 optionally LEDs on the board and the I2C/UART port), and the
                                    > >> ability to control either 2 motors or two servos for locomotion,
                                    > >> the new
                                    > >> board has 21 I/O ports (9 analog and 12 digital) all broken out to
                                    > >> 3 pin
                                    > >> servo style headers + a dedicated i2c port + 2 dedicated motor
                                    > >> ports, an
                                    > >> accelerometer, a 7 segment LED display and a dedicated 5V regulator
                                    > >> for
                                    > >> the I/O ports so no worrying about a brownout when driving a
                                    > bunch of
                                    > >> servos while trying to take readings from 9 Sharp sensors or
                                    > >> something
                                    > >> crazy. Oh ya, and a general purpose push button because it was
                                    > >> driving
                                    > >> me crazy that the old micro-ore board didn't have one. ;-)
                                    > >>
                                    > >> Where the old micro-ore board was 35mm by 35mm, the new micro-ore2
                                    > >> board... well... ok, it didn't shrink. If I had wanted to make it
                                    > >> smaller, I would have had to go to a four layer board and I'm too
                                    > >> cheap
                                    > >> to shell out the $$$. ;-) So the new board is 35mm by 35mm also.
                                    > >>
                                    > >> Why go with 2 processors? Well, I started with just the 44 pin
                                    > >> processor
                                    > >> and then decided that I wanted to have the 7-segment LED for
                                    > >> feedback. I
                                    > >> also didn't want to give up any of my precious A/D ports for the
                                    > >> accelerometer, thinking that I want to have more line sensors for a
                                    > >> more
                                    > >> brainy line follower. I searched for a 64 pin chip that was small
                                    > >> enough
                                    > >> but Microchip only has 64 pin QFN chips in their newer 3.3V
                                    > >> devices. For
                                    > >> ease of use I wanted to stay with 5V so I plunked down a second
                                    > >> processor.
                                    > >>
                                    > >> So, what is the downside to this new board? Well, the motor driver
                                    > >> only
                                    > >> handles 1A per channel typical with 1.2A max where the old one was
                                    > >> 1.2A
                                    > >> per channel with a 3A max. The old one has a 14 week lead time on
                                    > >> it and
                                    > >> I figured that I don't normally drive a bigger motor on these
                                    > boards
                                    > >> anyhow.
                                    > >>
                                    > >> And the other downside... this thing definitely cannot be
                                    > soldered by
                                    > >> hand unless you have a hot-air gun. It has 5 QFN devices on it. QFN
                                    > >> is
                                    > >> short for 'Holy F*ck, how the hell do I solder this thing".
                                    > >> Basically it
                                    > >> doesn't have any pins, just some metal pads on the bottom of the
                                    > >> package. 5 minutes in my reflow oven and it should be good to go
                                    > >> though.
                                    > >>
                                    > >> Anyhow, if anyone has an interest in double-checking my design and
                                    > >> making sure I didn't go off track somewhere I'd appreciate it. I'm
                                    > >> likely going to order 2 or 3 of them from APCircuits next week if
                                    > >> everything looks kosher.
                                    > >>
                                    > >> Aaron
                                    > >>
                                    > >>
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > ------------------------------------
                                    > >
                                    > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                                    > > ORE_bits-unsubscribe@...
                                    > >
                                    > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    >
                                    > --
                                    >
                                    > "The future is already here. It's just not very evenly distributed"
                                    > -- William Gibson
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > ------------------------------------
                                    >
                                    > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                                    > ORE_bits-unsubscribe@...
                                    >
                                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >

                                    --

                                    "The future is already here. It's just not very evenly distributed"
                                    -- William Gibson
                                  • Aaron Ramsey
                                    Email to amramsey at gmail.com is the best bet. Anyone else out there trying to connect to the Sparkfun servers??? Its madness. I think that their server has
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Jan 7, 2010
                                      Email to amramsey at gmail.com is the best bet.

                                      Anyone else out there trying to connect to the Sparkfun servers??? Its madness. I think that their server has likely melted at this point.

                                      Aaron


                                      On Thu, Jan 7, 2010 at 11:29 AM, Andrew Plumb <andrew@...> wrote:
                                      Excellent! I'll definitely take you up on the review offer.

                                      My "pipe cleaner" design is a heater control circuit for my Makerbot's
                                      heated build platform I'm working on. I've made it jumper-configurable
                                      so it can use either the TI TMP101 (I2C control) or TMP300 (resistor-
                                      programmable) for temperature sensing. The designs are GPL'd to be
                                      compatible with the rest of the RepRap/Makerbot or any other project
                                      that chooses to embrace+extend it.

                                      Should I just e-mail you the .sch and .brd files and go from there?

                                      Andrew.

                                      On 7-Jan-10, at 10:09 AM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:

                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Sure, no problem. I have Eagle installed on just about every
                                      > computer I own. <grin>
                                      >
                                      > If you (or anyone else) ever needs schematics or PCBs to be
                                      > reviewed, I'm always up for that too.
                                      >
                                      > Aaron
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > On Thu, Jan 7, 2010 at 10:04 AM, Andrew Plumb <andrew@...>
                                      > wrote:
                                      > Hey Aaron,
                                      >
                                      > Do you have Eagle installed on a laptop that you could bring along to
                                      > the meeting to quickly run through your APCircuits-targeted flow?
                                      >
                                      > Thanks!
                                      >
                                      > Andrew.
                                      >
                                      > On 6-Jan-10, at 6:41 PM, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                      >
                                      > > Sweet... PCBs shipped out today! APCircuits in Alberta is awesome.
                                      > > Stencil for the solderpaste shipped out from Pololu on Monday!
                                      > Samples
                                      > > from Microchip for the processors shipped yesterday!
                                      > >
                                      > >  A quick order from Digikey for a few parts that I don't have and
                                      > I'm
                                      > > good to go, I think. Unlikely that the stencil will show up before
                                      > > monday though for the meeting (Jan 11th at Algonquin college in the
                                      > > new
                                      > > room T102, same as December) but at least I'll have a few PCBs to
                                      > show
                                      > > off. <grin>
                                      > >
                                      > > Aaron
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > On 10-01-02 10:35 PM2-Jan-10, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                      > >> I just can't help myself... I love laying out PCBs. I was playing
                                      > >> with
                                      > >> my latest line follower over the holidays. It uses the micro-ore...
                                      > >> actually the micro-ore was pretty much designed for line following
                                      > >> back
                                      > >> when I made it in Oct 08. It works really well, but I got thinking
                                      > >> that
                                      > >> I'd like more I/O to turn it into a more general purpose small
                                      > robot
                                      > >> controller.<grin>
                                      > >>
                                      > >> So I spent a few days laying out a new board : Micro-ORE2!
                                      > >>
                                      > >> Schematics :
                                      > >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
                                      > >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch
                                      > >>
                                      > >> Board layout:
                                      > >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
                                      > >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
                                      > >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
                                      > >> http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png
                                      > >>
                                      > >> Where the original board used an 18 pin DSPIC30F3012for a
                                      > processor,
                                      > >> uore2 uses a 44 pin DSPIC30F4011 master processor and a 20 pin
                                      > >> PIC18F14K22 slave processor. That adds up to one a half times more
                                      > >> the
                                      > >> horse power, two and a half times the memory and over three times
                                      > the
                                      > >> I/O. Where the original board had 5 A/D ports, 5 digital ports
                                      > >> (shared
                                      > >> with 3 optionally LEDs on the board and the I2C/UART port), and the
                                      > >> ability to control either 2 motors or two servos for locomotion,
                                      > >> the new
                                      > >> board has 21 I/O ports (9 analog and 12 digital) all broken out to
                                      > >> 3 pin
                                      > >> servo style headers + a dedicated i2c port + 2 dedicated motor
                                      > >> ports, an
                                      > >> accelerometer, a 7 segment LED display and a dedicated 5V regulator
                                      > >> for
                                      > >> the I/O ports so no worrying about a brownout when driving a
                                      > bunch of
                                      > >> servos while trying to take readings from 9 Sharp sensors or
                                      > >> something
                                      > >> crazy. Oh ya, and a general purpose push button because it was
                                      > >> driving
                                      > >> me crazy that the old micro-ore board didn't have one. ;-)
                                      > >>
                                      > >> Where the old micro-ore board was 35mm by 35mm, the new micro-ore2
                                      > >> board... well... ok, it didn't shrink. If I had wanted to make it
                                      > >> smaller, I would have had to go to a four layer board and I'm too
                                      > >> cheap
                                      > >> to shell out the $$$. ;-) So the new board is 35mm by 35mm also.
                                      > >>
                                      > >> Why go with 2 processors? Well, I started with just the 44 pin
                                      > >> processor
                                      > >> and then decided that I wanted to have the 7-segment LED for
                                      > >> feedback. I
                                      > >> also didn't want to give up any of my precious A/D ports for the
                                      > >> accelerometer, thinking that I want to have more line sensors for a
                                      > >> more
                                      > >> brainy line follower. I searched for a 64 pin chip that was small
                                      > >> enough
                                      > >> but Microchip only has 64 pin QFN chips in their newer 3.3V
                                      > >> devices. For
                                      > >> ease of use I wanted to stay with 5V so I plunked down a second
                                      > >> processor.
                                      > >>
                                      > >> So, what is the downside to this new board? Well, the motor driver
                                      > >> only
                                      > >> handles 1A per channel typical with 1.2A max where the old one was
                                      > >> 1.2A
                                      > >> per channel with a 3A max. The old one has a 14 week lead time on
                                      > >> it and
                                      > >> I figured that I don't normally drive a bigger motor on these
                                      > boards
                                      > >> anyhow.
                                      > >>
                                      > >> And the other downside... this thing definitely cannot be
                                      > soldered by
                                      > >> hand unless you have a hot-air gun. It has 5 QFN devices on it. QFN
                                      > >> is
                                      > >> short for 'Holy F*ck, how the hell do I solder this thing".
                                      > >> Basically it
                                      > >> doesn't have any pins, just some metal pads on the bottom of the
                                      > >> package. 5 minutes in my reflow oven and it should be good to go
                                      > >> though.
                                      > >>
                                      > >> Anyhow, if anyone has an interest in double-checking my design and
                                      > >> making sure I didn't go off track somewhere I'd appreciate it. I'm
                                      > >> likely going to order 2 or 3 of them from APCircuits next week if
                                      > >> everything looks kosher.
                                      > >>
                                      > >> Aaron
                                      > >>
                                      > >>
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > ------------------------------------
                                      > >
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                                      > > ORE_bits-unsubscribe@...
                                      > >
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                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      >
                                      > --
                                      >
                                      > "The future is already here.  It's just not very evenly distributed"
                                      > -- William Gibson
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > ------------------------------------
                                      >
                                      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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                                      >
                                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >

                                      --

                                      "The future is already here.  It's just not very evenly distributed"
                                      -- William Gibson





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                                    • Aaron Ramsey
                                      All the pieces finally arrived yesterday... the mylar stencil was the last thing to come. Last night I tried out the stencil on the backside of the board
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Jan 14, 2010
                                        All the pieces finally arrived yesterday... the mylar stencil was the
                                        last thing to come. Last night I tried out the stencil on the backside
                                        of the board (mostly caps and resistors). It worked ok-ish... I didn't
                                        exactly plan my attack very well. I have bundles of extra PCBs around,
                                        so I placed a few next to my microORE2 board but everything was sliding
                                        around a bit, so I stuck down the ones on the sides with carpet tape.
                                        Doh! The heights weren't quite right then. I forged ahead anyhow and got
                                        a decent looking amount of solder paste on the board, placed the parts
                                        and then baked it in the reflow oven. A bunch of my 0402 caps ended up
                                        tombstoning (only one pad soldering and the component raised up in the
                                        air slightly so it doesn't touch the other pad). I'll have to work on
                                        that... I think I need to adjust my reflow profile perhaps.

                                        I fixed the tombstoned parts, flipped over the board.... and realized
                                        that I had no way to get the stencil onto the board night a flat now
                                        that the PCB had components on the other side. Doh! Well... my answer to
                                        everything these days is to fire up the CNC machine so I took some
                                        measurements of the PCB and cut a piece of wood up so that the PCB lays
                                        inside flush to the top of the board even when the bottom side of the
                                        board is populated. Sweet! By the time I had that cut up though I
                                        figured I'd quit for the night.

                                        Tonite after the kids went to bed I had a chance to try the top side of
                                        the board. Stencil works so much better with a nice flat surface around
                                        my board! Baked the board in the oven and 8 minutes later I was grinning
                                        like an idiot. As I hoped, all the components on the bottom of the board
                                        stayed stuck to the board even when hanging upside down through the
                                        second reflow. The surface tension of the solder is enough to hold the
                                        0402 and 0603 caps and resistors to the board.

                                        The top side of the board turned out pretty good too... had to touch up
                                        a few bridges on one of the pic processors... it has the finest pin
                                        pitch and my openings in the stencil for solder paste were likely a
                                        little large I guess.

                                        Managed to talk to both pics with my computer... loaded code into the
                                        slave pic and got it to blink some leds, so i'm a happy camper.

                                        Yee haw!

                                        Aaron




                                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mq-JrfIW24s


                                        On 10-01-02 10:35 PM2-Jan-10, Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                        > I just can't help myself... I love laying out PCBs. I was playing with
                                        > my latest line follower over the holidays. It uses the micro-ore...
                                        > actually the micro-ore was pretty much designed for line following back
                                        > when I made it in Oct 08. It works really well, but I got thinking that
                                        > I'd like more I/O to turn it into a more general purpose small robot
                                        > controller.<grin>
                                        >
                                        > So I spent a few days laying out a new board : Micro-ORE2!
                                        >
                                        > Schematics :
                                        > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.pdf
                                        > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.sch
                                        >
                                        > Board layout:
                                        > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/micro-ore2.brd
                                        > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-both.png
                                        > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-top.png
                                        > http://www.aaronramsey.com/public/uore2-bottom.png
                                        >
                                        > Where the original board used an 18 pin DSPIC30F3012for a processor,
                                        > uore2 uses a 44 pin DSPIC30F4011 master processor and a 20 pin
                                        > PIC18F14K22 slave processor. That adds up to one a half times more the
                                        > horse power, two and a half times the memory and over three times the
                                        > I/O. Where the original board had 5 A/D ports, 5 digital ports (shared
                                        > with 3 optionally LEDs on the board and the I2C/UART port), and the
                                        > ability to control either 2 motors or two servos for locomotion, the new
                                        > board has 21 I/O ports (9 analog and 12 digital) all broken out to 3 pin
                                        > servo style headers + a dedicated i2c port + 2 dedicated motor ports, an
                                        > accelerometer, a 7 segment LED display and a dedicated 5V regulator for
                                        > the I/O ports so no worrying about a brownout when driving a bunch of
                                        > servos while trying to take readings from 9 Sharp sensors or something
                                        > crazy. Oh ya, and a general purpose push button because it was driving
                                        > me crazy that the old micro-ore board didn't have one. ;-)
                                        >
                                        > Where the old micro-ore board was 35mm by 35mm, the new micro-ore2
                                        > board... well... ok, it didn't shrink. If I had wanted to make it
                                        > smaller, I would have had to go to a four layer board and I'm too cheap
                                        > to shell out the $$$. ;-) So the new board is 35mm by 35mm also.
                                        >
                                        > Why go with 2 processors? Well, I started with just the 44 pin processor
                                        > and then decided that I wanted to have the 7-segment LED for feedback. I
                                        > also didn't want to give up any of my precious A/D ports for the
                                        > accelerometer, thinking that I want to have more line sensors for a more
                                        > brainy line follower. I searched for a 64 pin chip that was small enough
                                        > but Microchip only has 64 pin QFN chips in their newer 3.3V devices. For
                                        > ease of use I wanted to stay with 5V so I plunked down a second processor.
                                        >
                                        > So, what is the downside to this new board? Well, the motor driver only
                                        > handles 1A per channel typical with 1.2A max where the old one was 1.2A
                                        > per channel with a 3A max. The old one has a 14 week lead time on it and
                                        > I figured that I don't normally drive a bigger motor on these boards
                                        > anyhow.
                                        >
                                        > And the other downside... this thing definitely cannot be soldered by
                                        > hand unless you have a hot-air gun. It has 5 QFN devices on it. QFN is
                                        > short for 'Holy F*ck, how the hell do I solder this thing". Basically it
                                        > doesn't have any pins, just some metal pads on the bottom of the
                                        > package. 5 minutes in my reflow oven and it should be good to go though.
                                        >
                                        > Anyhow, if anyone has an interest in double-checking my design and
                                        > making sure I didn't go off track somewhere I'd appreciate it. I'm
                                        > likely going to order 2 or 3 of them from APCircuits next week if
                                        > everything looks kosher.
                                        >
                                        > Aaron
                                        >
                                        >
                                      • Richard Cook
                                        ... Congrats! -- Richard Cook, 613-591-1456
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Jan 14, 2010
                                          Aaron Ramsey wrote:
                                          > Managed to talk to both pics with my computer... loaded code into the
                                          > slave pic and got it to blink some leds, so i'm a happy camper.
                                          >
                                          > Yee haw!

                                          Congrats!

                                          --
                                          Richard Cook, 613-591-1456
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