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Oki Semiconductor Incorporates Unique Features to Deliver Industry's Lowest Cost

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  • Michael Weseloh
    All, This seemed appropriate for this group! http://www2.okisemi.com/site/press/pressrelease/current/PR- Current.html/PR-20050808.html
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 8 1:07 AM
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      All,

      This seemed appropriate for this group!

      http://www2.okisemi.com/site/press/pressrelease/current/PR-
      Current.html/PR-20050808.html

      http://www.nuhorizons.com/ame51/

      http://www.mouser.com/index.cfm?
      handler=displayproduct&lstdispproductid=765029

      http://www2.okisemi.com/site/productscatalog/mcumpu/availabledocs/Int
      ro_ame51.html



      Oki Semiconductor Incorporates Unique Features to Deliver Industry's
      Lowest Cost, Easy to Use ARM-based Evaluation Kit

      New Fully-featured AME-51 Evaluation Kit allows designers to quickly
      evaluate Oki's 4050/4060 Series Advantage Microcontrollers

      For more information, contact us.
      Sunnyvale, Calif., August 8, 2005 - Oki Semiconductor, a leading
      technology partner for the new era of digital communications and
      convergence, today announced the availability of a low-cost, full-
      featured evaluation kit for its ARM7TMDI-based 4050/4060 Series
      Advantage Microcontrollers. At a suggested resale price of $249,
      Oki's Advantage Microcontroller Evaluation Kit (AME-51)is the lowest
      priced 'complete-in-one-box' ARM-based evaluation solution in the
      industry. The AME-51 kit enables product designers to easily
      integrate Oki's 4060 Series - The World's Smallest ARM - and 4050
      Series MCUs into their designs. Based on ARM's 32-bit architecture,
      Oki's AME-51 Kit provides designers with a complete and
      flexible 'plug and play' evaluation environment that is easy to use.
      This evaluation kit offers designers unique features to shorten the
      time to market for their products.
      Value-Added Customer Benefits and Features
      To further address the needs of today's designers of electronic
      products and devices, Oki's AME-51 Evaluation Board has been
      designed for modular expansion. All signals from the MCU have been
      brought to headers on the edge of the board allowing for easy
      expansion and signal probing. For faster and easier evaluation of
      the MCU features, the AME-51 Board includes an I2C temperature
      sensor; an analog potentiometer tied to the ADC; two RS-232
      connectors; a seven segment LED; additional user LEDs and pushbutton
      switches. All MCU system operating modes can be easily configured
      through convenient on-board switch settings.
      A key benefit of Oki's AME-51 Evaluation Board is that it allows an
      unlimited number of break points during debug, as well as
      instantaneous reload of the program code to the MCU. This feature
      overcomes a common limitation of competing products that have
      insufficient hardware breakpoints, and decreases development time by
      eliminating the need to reprogram the on-chip flash for each code
      modification. Commonly know as ROM emulation, this key feature is
      achieved by making use of the 1MB of external SRAM provided on the
      AME-51 board and the capabilities of the development tools included
      in the kit.
      Commenting on Oki's AME-51 Evaluation Kit, Dan Beadle, president of
      Incline Softworks LLC, said, "Thanks to the integrated capabilities
      of the tools and the AME-51 Board I was able to quickly isolate and
      correct the errors in my design. The source level debugging combined
      with the extended target visibility allowed me to keep my focus on
      solving the problem and not operating the tool."
      Taking a leadership position in providing cost-effective ARM-based
      evaluation solutions, Oki continues to build on the success of its
      growing line of ARM-based Advantage Microcontrollers and related
      development solutions, by offering designers an industry-standard
      MCU platform with strong industry support, including a constantly
      growing number of off-the-shelf software applications, and a wide
      variety of tools and software from third-party vendors. Oki's AME-51
      Kit was developed as part of its partnership with IAR Systems to
      meet the needs of its designers who require a low-cost 'plug and
      play' solution that will enable them to quickly evaluate Oki's
      4050/4060 Advantage Microcontrollers for use in their designs.
      Oki's AME-51 Kit, which is targeted for designers of electronic
      consumer, industrial, automotive, medical devices and general
      embedded systems, contains Oki's modular 4050/4060 Series evaluation
      board, IAR Systems' software development and debug environment, and
      full JTAG debug capabilities via a Universal Serial Bus (USB)
      connection. It also includes example source code for device
      peripherals, and Flash-programming tools. Moreover, Oki's AME-51
      Board is powered via the USB eliminating the need for a separate
      power supply. Everything required for evaluation and initial
      development is included with the AME-51 kit further shortening time
      to market for product development.
      "It was great! I had the system up and running, modified the sample
      code and watched the LEDs flash on the board the way I wanted them
      to in about ten minutes. Having everything that I needed included in
      the box made a significant difference and was a great time saver,"
      Beadle added.
      AME-51 Support and Development Tool
      Oki's AME-51 Evaluation Kit is compatible with Microsoft Windows and
      supported by the following industry-leading software development
      tools provided by IAR Systems:
      IAE Embedded Workbench for ARM, which is a complete integrated
      development environment that offers designers the following
      benefits:
      Kick Start 32KB C/C++ complier, assembler, linker, code editor, JTAG
      debugger with target control, and Instruction Set Simulator (ISS);
      The debugger offers extended target visibility allowing access to
      all of Oki?s 4050/4060 Series Advantage Microcontroller registers by
      name.? In addition, the debugger has an integrated Flash loader,
      which enables programming of the internal Flash of Oki MCUs;
      IAR Embedded Workbench for ARM is RTOS aware for popular RTOSes on
      the market.
      Oki's In-System-Flash-Programmer (ISFP) is a Windows GUI-based
      utility that enables reprogramming of the on-chip Flash via one of
      its UARTs using the serial cable included with the kit.
      "IAR Systems is excited about working with Oki to bring to market
      the industry's lowest cost full-featured ARM-based MCU evaluation
      kit," said Andreas Lifvendahl, global account manager, IAR
      Systems. "To enable full development with tools from IAR Systems, an
      incremental upgrade path is available."
      Customers needing greater than 32KB compilation only need to
      purchase an upgrade for IAR Embedded Workbench with its built-in
      C/C++ compiler and debugger tools. This enables seamless migration
      from evaluating the MCU to full product development with complete
      backward compatibility with any code already developed on the AME-51
      evaluation kit.
      Product Availability
      Oki's AME-51 Kit is available now through its distributors Nu
      Horizons, and Mouser. As a service to customers, Oki Semiconductor,
      Nu Horizons and IAR Systems will offer regional training seminars on
      the 4050/4060 Series Advantage Microcontrollers and the IAR Systems
      development environment. Moreover, customers who pre-register for
      the training seminars will be able to purchase Oki's AME-51 Kit at
      an introductory rate of $199 through Nu Horizons. The seminar
      schedules and registration are available at www.okisemi.com/us.
      About IAR Systems
      IAR Systems is one of the world's leading providers of programming
      tools for embedded systems. Its business concept is to offer
      products and services that help customers reduce development time
      and accelerate time to market. IAR Systems' customers represent many
      different market segments such as telecommunications, industrial
      automation and the automotive industry.
      The company was founded in 1983 and operates in the US, China,
      Japan, Brazil, Germany, the UK, Sweden and Denmark and has a large
      net of distributors all over the world. For additional information
      about IAR Systems, visit www.iar.com.
      About Nu Horizons Electronics Corp.
      Nu Horizons is a leading global distributor of advanced technology
      active components and system solutions, including analog, clock and
      timing devices, communications, computer products, discretes, flat
      panel display solutions, interface, logic, memory, microcontrollers
      and microprocessors, opto electronics and power, to a wide variety
      of commercial original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). With sales
      facilities in thirty-seven locations across North America and Asia,
      and logistics centers in centralized locations throughout the globe,
      Nu Horizons partners with a limited number of best-in-class
      suppliers to provide in-depth product and solutions expertise to its
      customers. Information on Nu Horizons and its services is available
      at www.nuhorizons.com.
      About Oki Semiconductor
      Building on Oki's century-long commitment to communications
      technologies and markets, Oki Semiconductor designs and markets a
      broad line of advanced integrated circuits for telecommunications,
      network, automotive, computer and consumer products. Oki's product
      lines include telecommunications, RF, laser, networking, speech
      synthesis, ASIC, microcontroller and memory devices, offered in a
      variety of creative packages. Founded in 1977 and headquartered in
      Sunnyvale, Calif., Oki Semiconductor is a division of Oki America
      Inc., which is a subsidiary of Oki Electric Industry Co, Ltd. Oki
      has ISO-9000-certified manufacturing facilities in Japan and
      Thailand. Information on Oki Semiconductor and its products is
      available at www.okisemi.com/us.
      Oki Semiconductor the Right Partner for a Digital World.
      Advantage Microcontrollers is a trademark of Oki Semiconductor and
      Oki Electric, Ltd.

      ARM and ARM7TDMI are registered trademarks of ARM Limited. ARM7 is a
      trademark of ARM Limited. ARM is used to represent ARM Holdings plc
      (LSE: ARM and Nasdaq: ARMHY); its operating company ARM Limited; and
      the regional subsidiaries ARM, INC.; ARM KK; ARM Korea LTD.; ARM
      Taiwan; ARM France SAS; and ARM Consulting (Shanghai) Co. Ltd.

      IAR Systems and IAR Embedded Workbench are registered trademarks
      owned by IAR Systems AB.

      All other brands or product names are the property of their
      respective holders.
    • Eric Engler
      Is there a documented API for supporting the USB interface on the PC? I write open source IDE s and I need to be able to program the flash, preferably over the
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 14 11:39 AM
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        Is there a documented API for supporting the USB interface on the PC?

        I write open source IDE's and I need to be able to program the flash,
        preferably over the USB interface.
      • kendwyer
        Hi Eric, The 4050/60 devices do not have a USB port. They use JTAG or Serial port for Flash erase/programming. They use standard SDP JEDEC Commands, the
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 16 8:26 AM
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          Hi Eric,

          The 4050/60 devices do not have a USB port.
          They use JTAG or Serial port for Flash erase/programming.
          They use standard SDP JEDEC Commands, the commands can be found in the
          User Manual for the product.

          Thanks,
          Ken
          --- In OKI-ARM-mcus@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Engler" <englere.geo@y...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Is there a documented API for supporting the USB interface on the PC?
          >
          > I write open source IDE's and I need to be able to program the flash,
          > preferably over the USB interface.
        • Eric Engler
          ... I misread the info at first, apparently the USB is just an adapter that lets a PC connect to the JTAG port. You can tell I m new to the ARM world because
          Message 4 of 12 , Aug 16 9:07 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In OKI-ARM-mcus@yahoogroups.com, "kendwyer" <kendwyer@y...> wrote:
            > The 4050/60 devices do not have a USB port.
            > They use JTAG or Serial port for Flash erase/programming.
            > They use standard SDP JEDEC Commands, the commands can be found in the
            > User Manual for the product.

            I misread the info at first, apparently the USB is just an adapter
            that lets a PC connect to the JTAG port. You can tell I'm new to the
            ARM world because this is something that a lot of development boards
            are using, according to my web searches today.

            I'm sure I can get the command info, but I need some kind of API on
            the PC side that will let me interact with the USB connection. Is this
            possibly mapped as a virtual serial port on the PC?

            I'd like to control the debugging features of an ARM chip from a PC
            application. I have written some IDEs for Freescale 9s12 chips and I
            was trying to determine if there was a way for me to support
            breakpoints and interactive debugging in general on ARM devices. The
            9s12 chips have a Background Debug Mode, and it's well-supported by a
            serial monitor. I can do a great deal of interactive debugging by
            issuing monitor commands over a standard serial port. They even let me
            set breakpoints on flash locations without any specialized hardware.

            I saw that there is apparently some debug features in ARM devices also
            (I saw some stuff at arm.com), but I need a way to use those features
            from a PC. Does anyone have ideas on this?

            My IDEs are commonly used in college classes because they don't have
            the funds to buy commercial IDEs. Anything I do for the Arm has to be
            low-cost in nature in order to be useful - in other words, its not
            possible for me to take advantage of commercial software in this project.

            Eric
          • Chris Hiszpanski
            Hi Eric, I used the Amontec ChameleonPOD in conjunction with GNU GDB (ARM Ltd. supported distribution at www.codesourcery.com). Take a look at
            Message 5 of 12 , Aug 17 4:21 AM
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              Hi Eric,

              I used the Amontec ChameleonPOD in conjunction with GNU GDB (ARM Ltd.
              supported distribution at www.codesourcery.com). Take a look at
              http://www.amontec.com It's ~$200, but relatively cheap in comparison to
              other commercial solutions.

              Cheers,
              Chris

              >--- In OKI-ARM-mcus@yahoogroups.com, "kendwyer" <kendwyer@y...> wrote:
              > > The 4050/60 devices do not have a USB port.
              > > They use JTAG or Serial port for Flash erase/programming.
              > > They use standard SDP JEDEC Commands, the commands can be found in the
              > > User Manual for the product.
              >
              >I misread the info at first, apparently the USB is just an adapter
              >that lets a PC connect to the JTAG port. You can tell I'm new to the
              >ARM world because this is something that a lot of development boards
              >are using, according to my web searches today.
              >
              >I'm sure I can get the command info, but I need some kind of API on
              >the PC side that will let me interact with the USB connection. Is this
              >possibly mapped as a virtual serial port on the PC?
              >
              >I'd like to control the debugging features of an ARM chip from a PC
              >application. I have written some IDEs for Freescale 9s12 chips and I
              >was trying to determine if there was a way for me to support
              >breakpoints and interactive debugging in general on ARM devices. The
              >9s12 chips have a Background Debug Mode, and it's well-supported by a
              >serial monitor. I can do a great deal of interactive debugging by
              >issuing monitor commands over a standard serial port. They even let me
              >set breakpoints on flash locations without any specialized hardware.
              >
              >I saw that there is apparently some debug features in ARM devices also
              >(I saw some stuff at arm.com), but I need a way to use those features
              >from a PC. Does anyone have ideas on this?
              >
              >My IDEs are commonly used in college classes because they don't have
              >the funds to buy commercial IDEs. Anything I do for the Arm has to be
              >low-cost in nature in order to be useful - in other words, its not
              >possible for me to take advantage of commercial software in this project.
              >
              >Eric
              >
              >
              >

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            • Doug Sutherland
              Is there any north american distributers for this chameleon pod? Sounds like what I ve been looking for. Thanks, Doug
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 17 5:52 PM
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                Is there any north american distributers for this chameleon pod?
                Sounds like what I've been looking for.

                Thanks, Doug


                Chris Hiszpanski wrote:

                >I used the Amontec ChameleonPOD in conjunction with GNU GDB (ARM Ltd.
                >supported distribution at www.codesourcery.com). Take a look at
                >http://www.amontec.com It's ~$200, but relatively cheap in comparison to
                >other commercial solutions.
                >
              • Chris Hiszpanski
                I m in California and bought mine straight from Amontec in Switzerland. Shipped within a few days. I don t know of any distributors. You may want to ask the
                Message 7 of 12 , Aug 17 7:37 PM
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                  I'm in California and bought mine straight from Amontec in Switzerland.
                  Shipped within a few days. I don't know of any distributors. You may want to
                  ask the company, though I don't think a distributor is necessary -- the
                  company will ship straight to you without the added cost of a middle man.

                  Cheers,
                  Chris

                  >Is there any north american distributers for this chameleon pod?
                  >Sounds like what I've been looking for.
                  >
                  >Thanks, Doug
                  >
                  >
                  >Chris Hiszpanski wrote:
                  >
                  > >I used the Amontec ChameleonPOD in conjunction with GNU GDB (ARM Ltd.
                  > >supported distribution at www.codesourcery.com). Take a look at
                  > >http://www.amontec.com It's ~$200, but relatively cheap in comparison to
                  > >other commercial solutions.
                  > >

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                • Eric Engler
                  ... I signed up for one of the free seminars advertised on this web page, but I was surprised that I never got an email confirmation. I also sent an email to
                  Message 8 of 12 , Aug 29 7:03 PM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    > http://www.nuhorizons.com/ame51/

                    I signed up for one of the free seminars advertised on this web page,
                    but I was surprised that I never got an email confirmation.

                    I also sent an email to one of the contact addresses to see if anyone
                    could verify my seat in the class, but nobody ever responded.

                    This seems odd to me?
                  • Eric Engler
                    I got email today from nuhorizons and OKI. They didn t show that I registered for the seminar. I don t know this for sure, but the website may have been
                    Message 9 of 12 , Aug 31 7:22 PM
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                      I got email today from nuhorizons and OKI. They didn't show that I
                      registered for the seminar. I don't know this for sure, but the
                      website may have been incompatible with Firefox. I suggest that if
                      anyone is thinking about signing up for a free sminar, it might be
                      wise to use Internet Explorer.

                      They've got me signed up now. Thanks to anyone who helped! It was
                      important to me to get this worked out. It sounds like a very
                      interesting seminar!

                      Eric
                    • Eric Engler
                      ... I just attended the class today in Atlanta. I was quite impressed! This was not a marketing event - this was a pure techie event. From the moment I arrived
                      Message 10 of 12 , Oct 11, 2005
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                        > http://www2.okisemi.com/site/press/pressrelease/current/PR-
                        > Current.html/PR-20050808.html
                        >
                        > http://www.nuhorizons.com/ame51/

                        I just attended the class today in Atlanta. I was quite impressed!
                        This was not a marketing event - this was a pure techie event.

                        From the moment I arrived I got "down and dirty" with the ame51 demo
                        board, the JLink, and the IAR tool suite. They had everything boxed up
                        when we arrived, and we unpackaged it, wired it up, and most of us got
                        it working in less than 15 minutes, before the class offically started!

                        The IAR representative couldn't make it so I was a little concerned at
                        first. But that doubt went away when it became obvious that the OKI
                        representatives were extremely knowledgeable about the IAR toolset.
                        They didn't miss a beat.

                        The demo projects were well thought-out, as was the ame51 board
                        itself. They had a large amount of RAM that could be configured into a
                        ROM emulation mode, which made it possible to support many breakpoints.

                        The instructors from OKI and Nu Horizons were very knowledgeable about
                        ARM devices in general, and not just the OKI devices. I asked a lot of
                        questions and several others asked a lot of questions, and we always
                        got great answers. These guys knew their stuff. In some classes I've
                        had before the instructors seemed to draw a blank if you get them off
                        of their prepared material, but this was not a problem in this class.

                        Their presentation was full of technical details and good advice, and
                        the labs were well designed. We only had 4 hours to work with, but it
                        was jam-packed with info and it'll take me a couple days to digest it all.

                        If any of you have a chance to attend this class in another city
                        please do it! It's the best 4 hours I've spent in a long time.

                        I had to rush out at the end because I was due accross town for a
                        meeting. I felt bad that I didn't have more time to socialize. I hope
                        the fine people involved with this event will get the word on how much
                        I enjoyed it.

                        Thanks OKI and Nu Horizons!
                      • junger zou
                        hi : it is seemed very well:-) but do you notice the write time of the Embeded flash of the chips , it is no more than 500 times, so maybe everyone want to use
                        Message 11 of 12 , Oct 11, 2005
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                          hi :

                          it is seemed very well:-)

                          but do you notice the write time of the Embeded flash
                          of the chips , it is no more than 500 times, so maybe
                          everyone want to use the chip they need get one AME51
                          first for debug.

                          Junger
                          --- Eric Engler <englere.geo@...>写道:


                          ---------------------------------
                          >
                          http://www2.okisemi.com/site/press/pressrelease/current/PR-
                          > Current.html/PR-20050808.html
                          >
                          > http://www.nuhorizons.com/ame51/

                          I just attended the class today in Atlanta. I was
                          quite impressed!
                          This was not a marketing event - this was a pure
                          techie event.

                          From the moment I arrived I got "down and dirty" with
                          the ame51 demo
                          board, the JLink, and the IAR tool suite. They had
                          everything boxed up
                          when we arrived, and we unpackaged it, wired it up,
                          and most of us got
                          it working in less than 15 minutes, before the class
                          offically started!

                          The IAR representative couldn't make it so I was a
                          little concerned at
                          first. But that doubt went away when it became obvious
                          that the OKI
                          representatives were extremely knowledgeable about the
                          IAR toolset.
                          They didn't miss a beat.

                          The demo projects were well thought-out, as was the
                          ame51 board
                          itself. They had a large amount of RAM that could be
                          configured into a
                          ROM emulation mode, which made it possible to support
                          many breakpoints.

                          The instructors from OKI and Nu Horizons were very
                          knowledgeable about
                          ARM devices in general, and not just the OKI devices.
                          I asked a lot of
                          questions and several others asked a lot of questions,
                          and we always
                          got great answers. These guys knew their stuff. In
                          some classes I've
                          had before the instructors seemed to draw a blank if
                          you get them off
                          of their prepared material, but this was not a problem
                          in this class.

                          Their presentation was full of technical details and
                          good advice, and
                          the labs were well designed. We only had 4 hours to
                          work with, but it
                          was jam-packed with info and it'll take me a couple
                          days to digest it all.

                          If any of you have a chance to attend this class in
                          another city
                          please do it! It's the best 4 hours I've spent in a
                          long time.

                          I had to rush out at the end because I was due accross
                          town for a
                          meeting. I felt bad that I didn't have more time to
                          socialize. I hope
                          the fine people involved with this event will get the
                          word on how much
                          I enjoyed it.

                          Thanks OKI and Nu Horizons!





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                        • Eric Engler
                          ... Wow, I didn t know it was only 500 times. That seems very low to me. But the AME51 board has 1 Meg of external RAM onboard, and they let you map it to the
                          Message 12 of 12 , Oct 14, 2005
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                            > but do you notice the write time of the Embeded flash
                            > of the chips , it is no more than 500 times, so maybe
                            > everyone want to use the chip they need get one AME51
                            > first for debug.

                            Wow, I didn't know it was only 500 times. That seems very low to me.

                            But the AME51 board has 1 Meg of external RAM onboard, and they let
                            you map it to the normal flash range. Most of the time people will
                            develop programs using this RAM feature. This lets you set more than 1
                            breakpoint, and this will help to save the flash.

                            I was suprised that they make one version of the chip small enough to
                            fit on a smart card (which is the size of a credit card).
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