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O-14 track roller gauges

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  • Marc Witten
    Hi can anyone direct me to a source for purchase a set of roller gauges for making my own track,because the set i had in my collection are missing,dont know
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 1, 2007
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      Hi can anyone direct me to a source for purchase a set of roller gauges
      for making my own track,because the set i had in my collection are
      missing,dont know how or where.

      many thanks inadvance

      marc witten
    • John Clutterbuck
      ... I m not sure if anyone does a roller gauge for O-14. You may find gauges for Sn3 but these will be for 14.2mm gauge. The only O-14 gauge I am aware of is
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 1, 2007
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        --- In O-14@yahoogroups.com, "Marc Witten" <Marc.Witten@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi can anyone direct me to a source for purchase a set of
        > roller gauges for making my own track

        I'm not sure if anyone does a roller gauge for O-14. You may find
        gauges for Sn3 but these will be for 14.2mm gauge. The only O-14 gauge
        I am aware of is Roy Link's which is a multi purpose gauge comprised
        of a single piece of hard brass with gauge, back to back etc. along
        the sides. Others may know otherwise.

        I personally never got on with roller gauges mainly because they
        wouldn't stay still on my gradients. I ended up making some from
        pieces of folded over brass with slots cut in the open end for
        the rails and the rest removed for clearance - they end up looking
        like two sets of two fingers peeping over a fence! When finished I
        open them up so they sit like a tent on the track and of course they
        won't roll away.

        John
      • John Clutterbuck
        ... I ve added a photo to my Trackwork Examples album which shows the RCL gauge and my homemade ones. Sorry about the rather poor quality. John
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 2, 2007
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          --- In O-14@yahoogroups.com, "John Clutterbuck" <jclutterbuck2001@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I personally never got on with roller gauges mainly because they
          > wouldn't stay still on my gradients. I ended up making some from
          > pieces of folded over brass with slots cut in the open end for
          > the rails and the rest removed for clearance - they end up looking
          > like two sets of two fingers peeping over a fence! When finished I
          > open them up so they sit like a tent on the track and of course they
          > won't roll away.
          >

          I've added a photo to my Trackwork Examples album which shows the RCL
          gauge and my homemade ones. Sorry about the rather poor quality.

          John
        • daniel caso
          John: That is really something I like. I ll try making a couple of them and see them at work. But the idea is brillant. Thank you. Daniel John Clutterbuck
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 2, 2007
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            John:
            That is really something I like. I'll try making a couple of them and see them at work. But the idea is brillant.
            Thank you.

            Daniel

            John Clutterbuck <jclutterbuck2001@...> wrote: --- In O-14@yahoogroups.com, "John Clutterbuck" <jclutterbuck2001@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > I personally never got on with roller gauges mainly because they
            > wouldn't stay still on my gradients. I ended up making some from
            > pieces of folded over brass with slots cut in the open end for
            > the rails and the rest removed for clearance - they end up looking
            > like two sets of two fingers peeping over a fence! When finished I
            > open them up so they sit like a tent on the track and of course they
            > won't roll away.
            >

            I've added a photo to my Trackwork Examples album which shows the RCL
            gauge and my homemade ones. Sorry about the rather poor quality.

            John






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          • adriangrayfr
            ... gauge ... The thing that roller gauges and, with respect to Roy, the RCL gauges don t do is provide for gauge widening on curved track. I m not being
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 3, 2007
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              --- In O-14@yahoogroups.com, "John Clutterbuck"
              <jclutterbuck2001@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In O-14@yahoogroups.com, "Marc Witten" <Marc.Witten@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi can anyone direct me to a source for purchase a set of
              > > roller gauges for making my own track
              >
              > I'm not sure if anyone does a roller gauge for O-14. You may find
              > gauges for Sn3 but these will be for 14.2mm gauge. The only O-14
              gauge
              > I am aware of is Roy Link's which is a multi purpose gauge comprised
              > of a single piece of hard brass with gauge, back to back etc. along
              > the sides. Others may know otherwise.
              >
              > I personally never got on with roller gauges mainly because they
              > wouldn't stay still on my gradients. I ended up making some from
              > pieces of folded over brass with slots cut in the open end for
              > the rails and the rest removed for clearance - they end up looking
              > like two sets of two fingers peeping over a fence! When finished I
              > open them up so they sit like a tent on the track and of course they
              > won't roll away.
              >
              > John
              >
              The thing that roller gauges and, with respect to Roy, the RCL gauges
              don't do is provide for gauge widening on curved track.
              I'm not being critical because I can see Roy's logic.
              Tiddy little 4-wheel locos and trucks don't really need gauge
              widening. Indeed, it is entirely possible that his prototype,
              Hudson, track didn't use it for just that reason - so nor did Roy!

              It is only when we start to move up to the 'mainline' 2ft gauge that
              the question begins to become important, as wheelbases get longer and
              six-coupled locos become an option.

              Many years ago a kind friend with similar interests made two track
              gauges for me - a roller for plain track and a 3-point gauge for
              curves. The latter is a piece of flat bar, of the correct width to
              set 14mm gauge when laid between two rails. If the outer rail of a
              curve is laid first the gauge, which has a hooked plate on top to fit
              over the inner rail, will give automatic gauge widening when put up
              against the outer rail with the inner held by the 'hook'. Not easy
              to describe!!
              The dimensions were arrived at by reference to EM gauge standards,
              since these are the wheel standards I use (Gibson wheels).
              It is too late, now, to dig it out and measure but I'll try to do so
              over the next few days.

              Adrian
            • David Woodcock
              Roller gauges are relatively easy to make without a lathe. Its probably best to use threaded rod as an axle with lengths of tube and washers making up the
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 4, 2007
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                Roller gauges are relatively easy to make without a lathe.

                Its probably best to use threaded rod as an "axle" with lengths of
                tube and washers making up the gauge itself and held in place by nuts
                and lock-nuts.
                If it is to be used a lot (and it probably will), then once you are
                certain is OK, dismantle it, coat the threaded "axle" in 24hour epoxy
                and reassemble - checking, of course, that it is still OK before the
                epoxy goes off. (If you can't get hold of threaded rod, then it is
                possible to tap each end of the central tube and screw cheesehead
                screws or bolts in instead.)

                With care taken to ensure that everything is finished off square,
                that the tubes are the right length and the washers (in multiples if
                necessary) are rubbed down to the right thickness, you can make a
                very nice roller gauge whose accuracy will be well within the
                tolerances that you can practically work to. The only accurate
                measuring tool needed for its construction is a vernier gauge.

                However, making up a 3-point gauge is a much more difficult
                proposition for home construction without machine tools, and yet, as
                Adrian hints, it is a much more useful gauge for track construction.

                I have had some success by using a thick piece of brass (at least 1mm
                thick) and three round-head screws (with nuts and lock-nuts) whose
                slots are a close fit on the rail-head; steel screws are best for
                strength and resistance to stray solder in use. Three holes are
                positioned accurately in the brass by using a GW Models rivetting
                tool to start them, and then slowly broaching out until the screws
                will just pass through. The screw round-heads are reduced in width to
                about 1mm at right angles to the slot (i.e. so that the slots
                themselves are reduced to about 1mm in length). Each screw is then
                assembled into the brass gauge in the sequence: screw-head - nut -
                brass-gauge - nut - lock-nut, a final check being made to ensure a
                good fit to straight rails which are parallel and correct to gauge
                before tightening the lock-nuts. Again 24hour epoxy can be used to
                ensure long life.

                Life would be a lot easier though if some kind manufacturer could
                make 3-point gauges available commercially for 14mm (or even 14.2mm)
                track; I would be quite happy to make all my track to the marginally
                wider gauge if it offers a better market opportunity (Sn3 and fine-
                scale TT) for a manufacturer. I have often thought that such a gauge
                would be THE most useful addition to the range of items available for
                On14 modellers.

                David Woodcock
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