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Re: [O14] Re: Toolbox

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  • Roy C Link
    Brian, I can reciprocate regards your advice regarding vices. All the commonly available hobby vices are either poor - or rubbish! My favorite for fine work
    Message 1 of 37 , Mar 4, 2013
      Brian,

      I can reciprocate regards your advice regarding vices. All the commonly available 'hobby' vices are either poor - or rubbish!

      My favorite for fine work is an old Eclipse instrument vice, now sadly unavailable - but you do see them on Ebay. Otherwise, a decent Bergeron watchmakers vice is ideal.

      Roy

      Tel: 01766 530784
      10am-5pm Mon-Sat only

      website: www.rclpublications.co.uk

      On 4 Mar 2013, at 02:17, Brian wrote:

       

      

      Roy,
      I totally agree with you, I use my torch for everything except electrical work, and like you I use aluminium plates for setting up jobs, I have one piece of aluminium that is 10mm. thick which I use for soldering chassis on.

      Brian
      Qld. Aust.

       


      From: O14@yahoogroups.com [mailto:O14@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Roy C Link
      Sent: Monday, 4 March 2013 9:52 AM
      To: O14@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [O14] Re: Toolbox

      I do not use a soldering iron for assembly - most times I use a torch, which gives instant heat and needs no cleaning. A decent needle point burner and a butane/propane mix will allow you to perform most soldering work, including silver soldering. For sweating sheet, I use an old individual electric hotplate - great for applying a rivetted overlay to a thick base. In all instances solder paint (Fryolux grade K) is used to wet the joint. Silver bearing soft solder (Staybrite) is used to feed the joint to give strength.

      An RSU is good for some jobs, particularly adding brass castings or similar to thin sheet superstructures. After a lifetime of model building, I only use an iron for whitemetal or electrical work.

      A torch is very versatile if you spend time getting used to it. Keep a wash bottle of clean water to hand to clean off flux residue and cool the job after the solder has set. No asbestos fingers needed.

      Use scraps of aluminium plate to make holding jigs for soldering parts - otherwise, you can pin parts to a vermiculite sheet.

      Ultimately, don't buy cheap, a good Swiss file will outlast any other and cut cleaner and neater if cared for. Making models for a living proved this to me many times.

      Roy

      Sent from my iPad

      On 3 Mar 2013, at 22:19, Simon Jones <simon@...> wrote:

       

      Thank you all for for so many suggestions - as many have said, modellers contradict and agree in equal measure about the methods and techniques that are best!

      Lots to think about.

      RSU is obviously a love/hate tool. Given my ability to spread solder everywhere and that 70% of the time that I have the soldering iron in hand seems to be trying to clean the tip, (despite filing off the crud and immediately tinning the bit as soon as switching it on, and using a Duncans Models tip cleaner) it's tempting.
      But the only model that appears to be available in the UK (London Road Models) is costlier than most O14 kits. Given my slow rate/quantity of modelling, I think I'll defer that for now. Maybe once I've a working layout and concentrate on stock.
      Even Ebay can't help despite the impression from other forums that there are many, unused, all over the country!

      I already using solder paste and low-melt on occasions-I've had some success soldering whitemetal kits. May add a mid-temp (145degree) to my stock as well.

      I've also tried silver-soldering for point crossings - fiddly to set up, but got acceptable results: I had a sheet of heat-resistant material from a local plumber, but it isn't really smooth enough for happily aligning those small parts. What do others use that is smooth, takes pins but doesn't burn? Or just use sacrificial wood/hardboard?

      Separate files just for brass & n/s seems a wise move.
      I've realised I don't use the grinding attachments with my Dremel as often as could be useful.

      Eileens Emporium have a brass, smooth-jawed hand-vice which looks like a suitable budget starter for etched folds.

      So I seem to have a basket ready to checkout with enough left from the aforementioned Baldwin price tag to get a wagon or two to go with the unstarted loco kits I already have in stock 8-)

      cheers
      Simon


      On 01/03/2013 22:51, John C wrote:
       

      And of course now I recall that's where I got mine from - sorry Paul, I really must try harder!

      John

      --- In O14@yahoogroups.com, Paul Martin wrote:
      >
      > with Nealetin solder paste - http://www.gwneale.co.uk/solderpaint.html
      >
      > available from me -
      > http://www.ngtrains.com/Pages/Glues/gluestools.html#Potions The pot of
      > solder description doesn't mention Nealatin but that is what it is
      >
      > if you find it dries out use Bakers Fluid as a thinner – it's pretty close
      > to what's in it. I asked them and that was their recommendation
      >
      >
      >
      > Paul
      >



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    • Brian
      Its not really a mess, when I want to find something I search for a couple of hours, and give up, and go looking for something else and then eventually find
      Message 37 of 37 , Mar 5, 2013
        Its not really a mess, when I want to find something I search for a couple of hours, and give up, and go looking for something else and then eventually find what I was looking for in the first place!!!!......(:-))
         

        Brian
        Qld. Aust.

         


        From: O14@yahoogroups.com [mailto:O14@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul Martin
        Sent: Tuesday, 5 March 2013 9:54 PM
        To: O14@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [O14] Re: Toolbox

        Brian

         

        This photo cheered me up no end

        http://tinyurl.com/bkto7gs

        I thought my workshop was a mess but it’s a paragon of virtue by comparison.

        I do have the same issue as you with multiple work stations. As I do this for a living now I have the main assembly bench (for want of a better explanation), a DCC and electronics desk and a painting desk. I am equipping each of these with the steel plate so the apron can move desk to desk with me.  I ended up with the multi desk situation because I got fed up of having to clear the bench (singular) to convert from one task to another.   I have the larger machine issue as you do but they live in a separately.

         

        When I try to justify all of this it doesn’t cut much ice as management just glares at me and reminds me that when we moved here I did all of this out of the little box room whereas I now have a large bedroom and, in effect, two garages

         

        Paul

         

        No virus found in this message.
        Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
        Version: 2013.0.2899 / Virus Database: 2641/6146 - Release Date: 03/03/13

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