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Re: [O14] Re: Toolbox

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  • Roy C Link
    Gents, For relieving half etch lines - why not use a graver? These useful tools come in a variety of profiles and shapes (square, lozenge etc.) and are a boon
    Message 1 of 37 , Mar 1, 2013
      Gents,

      For relieving half etch lines - why not use a graver? These useful tools come in a variety of profiles and shapes (square, lozenge etc.) and are a boon when cleaning up solder joints. I keep about a dozen different types on my bench and use them for cutting and cleaning. They sharpen up nicely with a whetstone.

      Roy

      Tel: 01766 530784
      10am-5pm Mon-Sat only

      website: www.rclpublications.co.uk

      On 1 Mar 2013, at 02:21, Brian wrote:

       

      Adrian,
      I wasn't having a go at you or anyone else for that matter, I was only making the point that when
      you do artwork for etching, in order to have the item fold and make up into the correct size it has
      to be, you design the width of the etch fold point to allow for the thickness of the material you
      are using, as an example I allow a .2mm. Width etch for .3mm. Material, and a .3mm. Width etch for
      .4mm. Material, after the etching is complete, and a close examination of the etch line, it is
      basically a "V" or "U" shape so the fold bends nicely at the required point, so far I have never had
      any problems, if I require the wall thickness to be thicker I make it as either a double fold, ie:
      .4mm. Would make it .8mm. thick or I just do 2 etches and lay the pieces together, depending on what
      is required.


      Brian
      Qld. Aust.
      -----Original Message-----
      From: O14@yahoogroups.com [mailto:O14@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of adriangrayfr
      Sent: Friday, 1 March 2013 10:51 AM
      To: O14@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [O14] Re: Toolbox

      Brian, you're being obtuse.

      It is a well known practice to relieve an etched fold line by gently scoring - indeed it is
      mentioned/recommended in almost every article or book published on the subject.
      The benefit is reduced risk of distortion and ease of producing a good, crisp, fold.
      Obviously it is less relevant if one wants to produce a fold that results in a final angle of less
      than 90degrees, when etched lines are provided to ease folding/rolling.
      however, the majority of etched folds are, in my experience, for 90degrees, so my words stand.

      Adrian

      --- In O14@yahoogroups.com, "Brian" wrote:
      >
      >
      > I am just wondering fella's, when Adrian mentioned about having to
      > make score marks etc. to make a fold, how come the etch doesn't already have an etched line to
      create the fold point?
      > I have posted 2 files in my Photos folder, [although they are
      > apparently awaiting approval for some reason], one of the files you
      > can see the etch layout for making the cylinder assembly or steam
      > chest for a 1/48th scale Na class loco, in the other file you can see
      > a photo of the part built loco with the cylinder assembly in place
      > with round brass cylinders soldered into it, this entire cylinder assembly is a complete folded up
      with all the necessary crease lines already in place, the whole thing was folded up using my
      fingers.
      >
      > Brian
      > Qld. Aust.
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: O14@yahoogroups.com [mailto:O14@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      > adriangrayfr
      > Sent: Friday, 1 March 2013 10:14 AM
      > To: O14@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [O14] Re: Toolbox
      >
      > Simon,
      >
      > Neil's kit is a real gem........the instruction disc is in the
      > computer as I type and I'm just trying to work out how I make the chassis sprung........
      >
      > Bending bars - use a craft knife to gently score an etched fold and
      > then a steel rule against a firm surface to create the fold - bending bars are a luxury for
      scratch-builders or very long folds.
      >
      > Rivet press - a good one of these is a real boon but, if your etched
      > kits have half etched rivet locations you can do just as well with one
      > of the less expensive 'drop-weight' rivet tools sold by the likes of
      > London Road Models - all it needs is practice on scrap material to get the hang of making the
      right size bump!
      >
      > Soldering - I worked for years in 4mm S4 with just a 15W, 25W and 40W
      > soldering irons. Bit of a pain if the right one wasn't plugged in when needed but....time to make
      a cuppa!
      > Since I bought an RSU I've used it for far more soldering than it was
      > really intended for, almost like an iron. You do still need an iron,
      > 25W minimum I suggest, to tin components before making the joint though.
      > I think that, on balance, my RSU is one of the tools I would take to my desert island.
      > On the same subject - keep and use solders in a range of temperatures.
      > 145 works beautifully on etched kits but using 175/185 in places where
      > you are building a substructure (loco chassis, carriage body) can
      > sometimes be helpful as it reduces the risk of detachment when you add
      > other bits and details later in construction. I sometimes erect a
      > structure using 145 for ease and then overlay with 175/185 when I'm sure it is all square and
      true. Low melt 70 solder has its place for adding w/m castings.
      >
      > Otherwise - GOOD (jaws meet properly and parallel) pliers, both flat
      > and snipe nose. GOOD swiss
      > (needle) files - keep a set for brass/nickel silver and another,
      > cheap, set in case you have to file whitemetal castings. One, or two,
      > small engineer's squares - if you're feeling flush a couple of sets of
      > the right angle clamps that are sold by the likes of EDM, but they are not strictly neccessary,
      just useful. A GOOD small vice with smooth jaws that meet perfectly flush and parallel.
      >
      > I wonder what others will suggest.
      >
      > Adrian
      >

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    • Brian
      Its not really a mess, when I want to find something I search for a couple of hours, and give up, and go looking for something else and then eventually find
      Message 37 of 37 , Mar 5, 2013
        Its not really a mess, when I want to find something I search for a couple of hours, and give up, and go looking for something else and then eventually find what I was looking for in the first place!!!!......(:-))
         

        Brian
        Qld. Aust.

         


        From: O14@yahoogroups.com [mailto:O14@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul Martin
        Sent: Tuesday, 5 March 2013 9:54 PM
        To: O14@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [O14] Re: Toolbox

        Brian

         

        This photo cheered me up no end

        http://tinyurl.com/bkto7gs

        I thought my workshop was a mess but it’s a paragon of virtue by comparison.

        I do have the same issue as you with multiple work stations. As I do this for a living now I have the main assembly bench (for want of a better explanation), a DCC and electronics desk and a painting desk. I am equipping each of these with the steel plate so the apron can move desk to desk with me.  I ended up with the multi desk situation because I got fed up of having to clear the bench (singular) to convert from one task to another.   I have the larger machine issue as you do but they live in a separately.

         

        When I try to justify all of this it doesn’t cut much ice as management just glares at me and reminds me that when we moved here I did all of this out of the little box room whereas I now have a large bedroom and, in effect, two garages

         

        Paul

         

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