Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: COUPLINGS

Expand Messages
  • drcassiar
    Hi All Just added a few more n.g coupling types to Daniel s photo album. The first 2, ÖSlJ 1 & 2 show a central buffer coupling with a kind of instanser 3
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 1, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi All

      Just added a few more n.g coupling types to Daniel's photo album.

      The first 2, ÖSlJ 1 & 2 show a central buffer coupling with a kind of
      instanser 3 link coupling either side. Note this is a museum railway
      running passanger services with no continuous brake! A brakeman rides
      in the rear carriage and helps control the train with the handbrake.
      This is the 600mm (~2') gauge Östra Södermanlands Järnväg, west of
      Stockholm.

      The third shows a modern automatic coupling (which carries the air for
      the continuous brake)on the 3' gauge Roslegsbahn in Stockholm. The
      vehicule is our preserved 1938 electric railcar but the coupling is
      the same as used on the modern stock. The chains are the safety
      chains, part of the earlier "centre buffer with screw-link under"
      system. I'll take a photo of the older style next time I'm down at
      our sheds in Stockholms Östra.

      Two pictures from Amberly, the first showing a very small centre
      buffer, link and pin on Bangnall Wendy, the second the classic block,
      link and pin on one of their Lister railtrucks.

      Finally 3 pictures of Norwegian style couplings on the Sittingbourne &
      Kemsey, two with all the springing external as used on the
      locomotives, and a third with the springing within the end of the wagon.

      best regards from Sweden, George
    • daniel caso
      George:             Great! Thank you!!!  Very good pictures. The chopper couplings in your photos looks much smaller than the ones from the Hudson
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 1, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        George:
                    Great! Thank you!!!  Very good pictures. The chopper couplings in your photos looks much smaller than the ones from the Hudson catalogue and others I've seen. Good to know about th many variations of each system.
                  

                            Daniel

                   Daniel

        --- On Mon, 9/1/08, drcassiar <drcassiar@...> wrote:
        From: drcassiar <drcassiar@...>
        Subject: [O-14] Re: COUPLINGS
        To: O-14@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, September 1, 2008, 2:36 PM











        Hi All



        Just added a few more n.g coupling types to Daniel's photo album.



        The first 2, ÖSlJ 1 & 2 show a central buffer coupling with a kind of

        instanser 3 link coupling either side. Note this is a museum railway

        running passanger services with no continuous brake! A brakeman rides

        in the rear carriage and helps control the train with the handbrake.

        This is the 600mm (~2') gauge Östra Södermanlands Järnväg, west of

        Stockholm.



        The third shows a modern automatic coupling (which carries the air for

        the continuous brake)on the 3' gauge Roslegsbahn in Stockholm. The

        vehicule is our preserved 1938 electric railcar but the coupling is

        the same as used on the modern stock. The chains are the safety

        chains, part of the earlier "centre buffer with screw-link under"

        system. I'll take a photo of the older style next time I'm down at

        our sheds in Stockholms Östra.



        Two pictures from Amberly, the first showing a very small centre

        buffer, link and pin on Bangnall Wendy, the second the classic block,

        link and pin on one of their Lister railtrucks.



        Finally 3 pictures of Norwegian style couplings on the Sittingbourne &

        Kemsey, two with all the springing external as used on the

        locomotives, and a third with the springing within the end of the wagon.



        best regards from Sweden, George





























        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • drcassiar
        Hi all After an excellent day out at the Östra Södermanlands Järnväg (ÖSlJ)season finally yesterday, I m now stuck in the lab waiting for an instrument to
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 28, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi all

          After an excellent day out at the Östra Södermanlands Järnväg
          (ÖSlJ)season finally yesterday, I'm now stuck in the lab waiting for
          an instrument to warm up, so thought I'd take opportunity to upload
          some more pictures to Daniel's COUPLINGS album.

          The first two show what was the SJ (Swedish federal railway) more or
          less standard coupling for narrow gauge. This incorporates a centre
          buffer with a screw-link under (missing on the wagon pictured). They
          were used on both the 600mm gauge wagon illustrated, and on the
          extensive 891mm (Swedish 3') gauge systems. Note! This wagon is
          upside down. The opening in the centre buffer normally faces the ground.

          The second two photographs illustrate another variation on the type of
          coupling currently used by the ÖSlJ and historically by a number of
          Swedish 600mm (metric 2'!) gauge systems, see earlier posting. This
          example comes from one of a pair of single bolster wagons that were
          running on mixed trains yesterday and illustrates the way the centre
          buffer is linked to the 2 side couplings by a rocking arm.

          Incidentaly, the ÖSlJ is a 600mm gauge museum railway west of
          Stockholm. It currently runs just over 4km along the trackbed of an
          old standard gauge branch, but the volunteers are in the process of
          converting the next 7km. Yesterday, for example, there were 4 steam
          engines, 2 diesels, a 1934 built railcar based on an old volvo, and a
          battery electric (with teak tongue & groove body!) in operation. OK,
          it was the end of season gala, but a normal weekend would still see 2
          steam engines and several of the other locomotives operating.

          best regards from Sweden, George!
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.