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5789RE: [O14] RE: Van in FR Tan-y-Bwlch cutting photo

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  • Frank Sharp
    Feb 15, 2014
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      At your date orthochromatic film, panchromatic wasn't 'invented' until c WW! and not readily available until 1930. See Maurice Earley's book 'Truly the Great Western'. Note that as soon as he went onto panchromatic film overalls went darker and buffer beams lighter.




      From: O14@yahoogroups.com [mailto:O14@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of adrian@...
      Sent: 15 February 2014 20:26
      To: O14@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [O14] RE: Van in FR Tan-y-Bwlch cutting photo




      It is an interesting little train and, I'll rise to your bait!!

      The loco is Prince and the date is 1894 - 1905, probably earlier, rather than later.  He is paired with an iron framed tender, but not one of the later ones I wrote about earlier as the tops if the sides are angles, rather than flared and it is not quite as wide as the loco cab.

      First waggon is almost certainly a two plank, 1 ton open, possibly with large drop door (not whole dropside). I can provide a photo of this sort of waggon, if required.  No kit available for this, as yet, as it is a bit obscure.

      Second is a large GPV, available as the Port Wynnstay kit, painted in a light colour that _might_ be red, or dirty white or just light grey!

      Third, as you say, is one of the 4-ton opens, also available as a Port Wynnstay kit.

      Fourth, as the Marquis has suggested, certainly looks like one of the Mk2b quarrymen's carriages, though the detail of the end is a bit curious.  I'm prepared to accept that it is a conversion to a small van, though it could be a purpose built van of similar style and dimensions.

      Whether shunting or Down train is moot at this remove in time.  The former might be to add vehicles to the rear of an Up train further up the station and the latter would be a move of its own.  Either would require the vehicles to move Down over this stretch of line, apparently moving 'wrong line' because the bottom end of the goods yard was only ever connected to the Up line through the station.  By this date the Top end of the yard was also connected directly to the Up line and the curious 'centre road' had been removed or disconnected - a consequence of the fitting of the vacuum brake to locos and passenger stock.  But you'll know that much from reading your FR Heritage Group Journals!

      I have another photo of a short freight and England at TyB, from a slightly later date that you could model entirely using the Mercian England and Port Wynnstay kits! 



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