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Two Photos

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  • Pat Demuth
    From Raymond Crippen I am sending you two photos that I computerized from two old negatives I came upon. The first, quite marginal, is labeled Ellsworth,
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 13, 2002
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      From Raymond Crippen

      I am sending you two photos that I computerized from two old negatives I
      came upon.

      The first, quite marginal, is labeled Ellsworth, 1902. The view is from
      the south, slightly southwest. The grain elevator at top left bordered the
      railroad track; the track ran, approximately, across the top of the photo.
      The notable, two-story white frame building is the city hall/opera house
      which was built in 1894. It burned in January, 1904 - the fire engine and
      hook and ladder trucks were in that building, according to Rose, and the
      fire was fought with bucket brigades. The new - well, 1904 - city hall and
      opera house, a dandy, brick building, is on the same site as the old one, or
      very near that site. There is a large tent in the foreground; I wonder if
      that is a circus tent - perhaps that was occasion for the photo. In the
      mid-foreground, slightly left, is a house with two trees along the street.
      Next to the house, behind it, is a frame business building which may still
      be on that site.

      The second photo is represented as the store of S.B. Bedford at Rushmore.
      There is no date. Bedford is said to be the man sitting beside the box at
      left, with his legs in front of the bicycle wheel. The man behind him in the
      suit and tie is said to be the clerk, Donald Pettit. I am guessing this
      store is the two-story S.M. Rushmore & Co. general store which Rose tells of
      and which he says was completed in August, 1878. S.B. Bedford is the Ludlow
      ancestor for whom Bedford Industries is named. Rose says Bedford secured a
      diploma as a pharmacist in 1880, left the Rio Barber drug store at
      Worthington where he worked, and bought a small drug store at Rushmore. That
      same fall he bought the S.M. Rushmore store. He was 23 at the time. In 1894
      he established the Bank of Rushmore. In 1906, he ran for the state senate
      from the Nobles-Murray district, beat out Daniel Shell in the Republican
      primary, and defeated the Democratic candidate, John F. Flynn, in the
      general election.
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