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911 LIES: FBI Confiscates Personal Property Of Former U.S. Army Corporal Who Blew Whistle On 1976 Government funded

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  • Connie
    Nothing is as it seems and all of history is a lie. From: Dstacey don.stacey@comcast.net 911 LIES: FBI Confiscates Personal Property Of Former U.S. Army
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 1, 2005
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      Nothing is as it seems and all of history is a lie.

      From: Dstacey don.stacey@...
      911 LIES: FBI Confiscates Personal Property Of Former U.S. Army Corporal Who Blew Whistle On 1976 Government funded "Perfect Terrorist Plan" To Topple Twin Towers

      FBI Confiscates Personal Property Of Former U.S. Army Corporal Who Blew Whistle On 1976 Government funded "Perfect Terrorist Plan" To Topple Twin Towers

      Timothy McNiven says he has been harassed by the FBI and now had DOD card taken without a warrant ever since trying to alert the American people about the government's prior knowledge of 9/11.

      July 31, 2005

      By Greg Szymanski

      A former U.S. Army corporal who blew the whistle on a 1976 government funded study to topple the Twin Towers using jetliners, Arab terrorists and box cutters on July 6 had four FBI agents threaten to "tear his apartment apart" if he didn't turn over his legally obtained Department of Defense ID card.

      Timothy McNiven, who said he was threatened and harassed by agents in the hallway outside his Bellingham, WA., apartment, claims to be a part of a military unit stationed in Strasbourg, Germany, during the 1970s, assigned the task to brainstorm "the perfect terrorist plan" and what turned out to be the exact same scenario that took place at the WTC on 9/11.

      McNiven said his military unit's 9/11-like assignment, lasting over six months and funded by Congress under the guise of airline safety preparedness, proves the government had "plenty of foreknowledge" about possible airline attacks at the WTC.

      He even suggested what seemed like a harmless military airline safety study may have been used later to perfect a way to bring down the WTC in order to create another Pearl Harbor like event to facilitate a world wide climate of war.

      And since 9/11, McNiven has tried in every way possible to alert the American people about his unit's mock military assignment, creating even more suspicion of the government's hand in 9/11, by first creating a web site and then telling his story in March to The American Free Press and The Arctic Beacon news web cast.

      McNiven's accusations about the hidden purpose behind the Congressional study are also included in a signed affidavit as part of a 9/11 related federal conspiracy (RICO) lawsuit filed against President Bush and others in 2004 by Philadelphia attorney Phil Berg.

      The publicized version of the study, commissioned by Congress, was to identify security lapses and submit corrective measures to lawmakers," said McNiven. "However, the real purpose of the study was to brainstorm how to pull off a terrorist attack using the exact same 9/11 scenario."

      To back up his story, he passed a credible lie detector test, the same type of credible test taken by Daniel Ellsberg and other famous whistle blowers as well as providing many names of the men his unit who also participated in the mock WTC assignment.

      McNiven claims, however, since going public and being a part of the law suit, his efforts have been met with government indifference, outright harassment and constant FBI monitoring, the July 6 FBI visit to his Bellingham home another example.

      "Our commanding officer back in 1976, Lt. Michael Teague, gave our unit of about 100 a direct order and assignment to brainstorm how to bring down the Twin Towers using jetliners and even box cutters," said McNiven this week from his apartment in Bellingham about the study commissioned to C-Battery 2/81st Field Artillery, U.S. Army, stationed in Strasbourg, Germany.

      "I remember Lt. Teague changed the scenario from a 100 story building to the Twin Tower , acting on specific orders from unknown superiors. He then said it was very strange to be asked to devise a plan to blow up your own home town as he was from New York .

      "But as I watched the Twin Towers really collapse on the morning of September 11th, I realized I was watching the very same thing we devised in the 1976.

      McNiven recalls at first Lt. Teague demanded strict silence regarding the assignment, but later took him aside, giving him a direct order to "never stop alerting the American people" about the government's obvious hand in working on a plan to bring down the Twin if it ever really happened.

      "I still feel I am under this direct order and have no intention of disobeying it," said McNiven, adding he still feels his active military duty has not ended due to 9/11.

      Regarding the FBI visit to McNiven's home on July 6, a spokesperson from the Bellingham , WA., office confirmed agent Lance Boyer and three others confiscated McNiven's DOD card outside his apartment on the date mentioned, but refused to comment further about the nature, legality or purpose for taking his personal property.

      The FBI spokesperson added that his property was taken without a proper warrant, McNiven claiming he only gave it up after being "threatened and harassed" by the four agents in the hallway outside his apartment.

      "Agents did go to Mr. McNiven's home and did take his ID card, but that's all we can say right now," said the Bellingham FBI spokesman several hours after the incident occurred.

      Although the FBI refused to elaborate, McNiven said he has been singled-out, intimidated and harassed for going public about the mock 1976 "perfect terrorist plan."

      "This visit was not to get information but to harass me. I got a reply from the ACLU and they said that I had a legal case but they did not have the resources to take it on," he said.

      "In May 2004, I wrote to several FBI offices asking them to do some research for me and to help find the members of C-Battery 2/81st FA, US Army, the men who also worked on the 1976 mock terrorist study. I have kept a copy of the email to the FBI and this is the reason why they I think they showed up."

      McNiven said in the past he has tried to relocate many of his former unit members, years ago finding one member, Sgt. Riggs, who was reluctant to talk since Riggs claimed he and his family members had already experienced death threats over going public about the 1976 airline safety study.

      Elaborating further on the FBI visit, McNiven recalls in detail facts indicating agents had been tracking his movements for at least a year.

      "We started talking in the hallway of my apartment and they asked me if I was a federal agent and I said yes I had an ID to prove it. We walked to my room and I showed them my DOD ID card," said McNiven.

      "Then we talked a little more, with one guy doing the questioning, and then two of the other guys started to make smart-ass comments, one of these guys being Agent Boyer."

      He said the agents then insisted on seeing his ID card again, McNiven giving it to Agent Boyer but then ripping it out his hand after the agents questioned the validity of his identification.

      "One of the Hispanic agents then began to threaten me, saying if I did not give them my ID that they would go and get a bunch of Bellingham Police and come back and tear my place apart," said McNiven.

      "So I gave them the ID after, although asking for a receipt, which they gave me. It was strange, though, they knew about my trip to the Pentagon in August 2004 and the letter I sent to the personnel office, which they asked me if the Bellingham Police had come to talk to me about and I said they hadn't.

      "I told them that the only people I had ever contacted about getting a new DOD card, as I used to work under cover for them but recently stopped, were lawyers like Gerry Spence, DOD personnel and Federal Judge Coughenour from the Seattle Federal Court. I also gave them the envelope and letter that came along with the ID, saying that it was a federal judge who helped me get this ID in the first place."

      McNiven said the FBI has not returned his DOD card or has not contacted him since the July 6 incident, saying he believes they are "waiting for my next move" which McNiven said will be made before a court of law.

      Regarding the validity of his DOD affiliation, McNiven said he went through the proper official channels, needing to renew his ID card last year in order to officially carry out his orders given to him by Lt. Teague as a result of 9/11.

      McNiven added he is no stranger to DOD as he worked in the late 1980s and early 1990s as an undercover agent on several drug related government investigations.

      "A DOD card is a government agency ID just like any other, in this case giving me authority for my military mission to alert the American people about the 1976 plan to topple the Twin Towers ," said McNiven.

      "I also have the authority to arrest on federal charges like treason or espionage and through Interpol for crimes against humanity and war crimes, which were recently expanded when the International Criminal Court went into effect."

      At the time of the FBI visit, McNiven had also just sent the first installment of a proposed book about his life and participation in the 1976 mock terrorist assault on the Twin Towers to an editor of First Amendment Publishing affiliated with The American Free Press.

      For more informative articles, go to www.arcticbeacon.com.


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