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Kyoto Cities Challenge The United States and global warming: a tale of two countries

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  • Eric Britton
    Note: This discussion has been moved over from the Kyoto Cities Forum to the New Mobility Café. Both are visible via the http://kyotocities.org site via the
    Message 1 of 1 , May 11, 2005
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      Note: This discussion has been moved over from the Kyoto Cities Forum to the New Mobility Café. Both are visible via the http://kyotocities.org site via the Working Groups Forum link on http://ecoplan.org left menu.

       

       

       

      -----Original Message-----

      From: Gabriel Roth [mailto:roths@...]

      Sent: Wednesday, May 11, 2005 4:01 PM

       

      Stephen -

       

      My data are at least ten years old. I hope your UK ones will shed more light.

       

      The proposition that "We should be more concerned about the risks

      that people impose on others" is attractive, but I'm not sure how far

      it should be applied. If people post notices outside their homes

      announcing that they installed burglar alarms, are they not

      transferring the risk of burglary to others? More to the point, would

      you object to families in Bangladesh upgrading from scooters to light

      cars? Would you not like to see young people in the UK switching from

      motor-cycles to cars? When my son and daughter were in college I

      bought them an ex-London taxi - slow and heavy - to enhance their

      mobility.  Pollution from car exhausts has fallen substantially in

      recent years.

       

      I do not see "Fuel versus lives" as simplistic, but as going to the

      heart of the issue. Many in the environmental movement promote

      policies that cost lives in the short-term to promote hypothetical

      long-term gains. The opposition to DDT to fight Malaria is

      particularly revealing. Global warming, at about one degree C in a

      hundred years, is negligible, and I've seen no evidence that past

      warming periods (e.g. in the era when Greenland was "green") cost

      many lives.

       

      Best wishes -

       

      Gabriel

       

      Roths can also be reached at:

      4815 Falstone Avenue

      Chevy Chase, Maryland

      USA  20815

      Voice: 1 301 656 6094

      Fax   : 1 202 318 2431

       

       

      >Gabriel

      >

      >You say

      >

      >"But occupants of light cars suffer from accidents more than occupants

      >of heavy cars, even in accidents that do not involve a mix of

      >light/heavy cars."

      >

      >I doubt this remark,  but hope to have some better evidence from GB

      >fairly soon.

      >

      >Suppose it to be true, and suppose also that it is genuinely a

      >function of mass and not just a phenomenon related to, or curable

      >by, car design,I wd still quarrel with your conclusion. We shd be

      >more concerned about the risks that people impose on others than

      >about the ones they choose to bear themselves. When a heavy car is

      >involved in a crash with a light one, the light one comes off worse.

      >The occupants of the heavy car have (not wholly but to a large

      >degree) transferred their share of the risk to the occupants of the

      >light one. Should that be allowed?

      >

      >Isn't "fuel versus lives" in any case rather simplistic? Global

      >warming will cost many lives. Pollution from car exhausts costs

      >lives even now.

      >

      >Good to hear from you, even so,

      >

      >Stephen  

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