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fuel tax

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  • Simon Norton
    In answer to Charlie Lloyd, if a traffic scheme encourages motorists to shift to buses then it produces revenue for the bus operator. I may also add that if it
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 22, 2005
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      In answer to Charlie Lloyd, if a traffic scheme encourages motorists to shift to
      buses then it produces revenue for the bus operator. I may also add that if it
      saves journey time for the bus then it reduces the operator's costs.

      Does this revenue filter over to the public sector ? Yes if the service is run
      by or on behalf of a public sector body, in other cases possibly but possibly
      not.

      Is our Government taking account of this ? Anyone know ?

      What is indisputable is that with fuel taxes tiny in any meaningful sense
      (whatever motorists may think), the transfer of people from cars to buses makes
      sense even in narrow economic terms.

      Incidentally, I just heard that Edinburgh has rejected congestion charging.

      Simon Norton
    • Eric Bruun
      Simon I would like to know as well. Surely the state gets nothing on the increased ridership on market based services, but it might on the minority of
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 22, 2005
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        Simon

        I would like to know as well. Surely the state gets nothing on the increased
        ridership on "market" based services, but it might on the minority of
        services which are subsidized. I guess it depends on whether a flat amount
        of subsidy is given or whether the State makes up the difference in
        operating costs.

        In any case, this is just one more example of the kind of upside-down
        incentives that have resulted from the ill-advised deregulation. What is
        disappointing is how Labor continues the same far-right "free market"
        policies as the Tories. If they had tried to bring public policy in line
        with the rest of Europe, the UK wouldn't have such problems.

        Eric Bruun

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Simon Norton" <S.Norton@...>
        To: <newmobilitycafe@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2005 8:19 AM
        Subject: [NewMobilityCafe] fuel tax


        >
        > In answer to Charlie Lloyd, if a traffic scheme encourages motorists to
        shift to
        > buses then it produces revenue for the bus operator. I may also add that
        if it
        > saves journey time for the bus then it reduces the operator's costs.
        >
        > Does this revenue filter over to the public sector ? Yes if the service is
        run
        > by or on behalf of a public sector body, in other cases possibly but
        possibly
        > not.
        >
        > Is our Government taking account of this ? Anyone know ?
        >
        > What is indisputable is that with fuel taxes tiny in any meaningful sense
        > (whatever motorists may think), the transfer of people from cars to buses
        makes
        > sense even in narrow economic terms.
        >
        > Incidentally, I just heard that Edinburgh has rejected congestion
        charging.
        >
        > Simon Norton
        >
        >
        >
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