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"Old Mobility = mechanical solutions to biological problems"

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  • eric britton
    From: Ann Hackett [mailto:aha@pacific.net] Sent: Sunday, 01 August, 2010 20:53 Some thoughts on Old Mobility = mechanical solutions to biological problems.
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 1, 2010
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      From: Ann Hackett [mailto:aha@...]
      Sent: Sunday, 01 August, 2010 20:53


      Some thoughts on "Old Mobility = mechanical solutions to biological
      problems."

      1. "Why the narrow binomial choices...?" We're a product of our
      conditioning through experience, education and advertising.

      2. Those "mechanistic approaches" to maintaining our current system
      have caused problems for users and our environment but have served those
      who benefit from these approaches very well and they don't want it to be
      fixed. Look at profits, advertising budgets, tax revenue, etc...

      3. Search for "ants + transportation" and "Ant Colony Algorithm" and
      find evidence in favor of biological traffic organization by ants with
      their highly developed social behavior.

      4. How to get a shift in character, away from artificially created
      desires of independence to highly developed social behavior?

      5. Currently our binomial choices are:
      Dependent = Public Transportation
      Independent = Private, Car Ownership

      The 3rd option is:
      Interdependent = Shared Transportation

      6. Decreasing the convenience of parking re-prioritizes the choices.
    • Ian Perry
      Hi Ann, We agree with most things, however, are the independent transport modes not walking, running, skating and cycling? Car use is increasingly dependent -
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 2, 2010
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        Hi Ann, 

        We agree with most things, however, are the independent transport modes not walking, running, skating and cycling?

        Car use is increasingly dependent - on an ever dwindling number of service stations, the mechanical expertise and technology of others and the ability of local and national governments to afford road repairs.  Already in the US, paved roads are being returned to gravel roads as local governments can no longer afford road repairs.  Roads are built with ever increasingly expensive oil... and increasingly owned privately and paid for through tolls.

        I think that many will be redefining car ownership in the near future.

        How long before the view of the car tips from a form of transport of independence to one of dependence?

        Ian


        On Sun, Aug 1, 2010 at 9:11 PM, eric britton <eric.britton@...> wrote:
         

        From: Ann Hackett [mailto:aha@...]
        Sent: Sunday, 01 August, 2010 20:53

        Some thoughts on "Old Mobility = mechanical solutions to biological
        problems."

        1. "Why the narrow binomial choices...?" We're a product of our
        conditioning through experience, education and advertising.

        2. Those "mechanistic approaches" to maintaining our current system
        have caused problems for users and our environment but have served those
        who benefit from these approaches very well and they don't want it to be
        fixed. Look at profits, advertising budgets, tax revenue, etc...

        3. Search for "ants + transportation" and "Ant Colony Algorithm" and
        find evidence in favor of biological traffic organization by ants with
        their highly developed social behavior.

        4. How to get a shift in character, away from artificially created
        desires of independence to highly developed social behavior?

        5. Currently our binomial choices are:
        Dependent = Public Transportation
        Independent = Private, Car Ownership

        The 3rd option is:
        Interdependent = Shared Transportation

        6. Decreasing the convenience of parking re-prioritizes the choices.


      • Adrian Bell
        There is absolutely a difference between the philosophical and functional views of transport. Car travel spans the two and marks the essential struggle many
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 2, 2010
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          There is absolutely a difference between the philosophical and functional views of transport. Car travel spans the two and marks the essential struggle many have. New mobility may be driven by tangible and critical needs but still represents an ideology of how we can live. We also recognise the common barriers to new mobility which amount to the factors of modern living that have variously acted or shaped a functional response. Cars are hence seen as essential to many while other perspectives are considered idealistic at best.

          So a car offers both independence of another's choice on route and stops but confers on the user a host of dependencies from mechanical to resources and administration to poorer health.

          Adrian Bell
          Project Director
          Applied Information Group
          Sent from my iPhone 


          On 2010-08-02, at 3:33, Ian Perry <ianenvironmental@...> wrote:

           

          Hi Ann, 


          We agree with most things, however, are the independent transport modes not walking, running, skating and cycling?

          Car use is increasingly dependent - on an ever dwindling number of service stations, the mechanical expertise and technology of others and the ability of local and national governments  to afford road repairs.  Already in the US, paved roads are being returned to gravel roads as local governments  can no longer afford road repairs.  Roads are built with ever increasingly expensive oil... and increasingly owned privately and paid for through tolls.

          I think that many will be redefining car ownership in the near future.

          How long before the view of the car tips from a form of transport of independence to one of dependence?

          Ian


          On Sun, Aug 1, 2010 at 9:11 PM, eric britton <eric.britton@ecoplan.org> wrote:
           

          From: Ann Hackett [mailto:aha@pacific. net]
          Sent: Sunday, 01 August, 2010 20:53

          Some thoughts on "Old Mobility = mechanical solutions to biological
          problems."

          1. "Why the narrow binomial choices...?" We're a product of our
          conditioning through experience, education and advertising.

          2. Those "mechanistic approaches" to maintaining our current system
          have caused problems for users and our environment but have served those
          who benefit from these approaches very well and they don't want it to be
          fixed. Look at profits, advertising budgets, tax revenue, etc...

          3. Search for "ants + transportation" and "Ant Colony Algorithm" and
          find evidence in favor of biological traffic organization by ants with
          their highly developed social behavior.

          4. How to get a shift in character, away from artificially created
          desires of independence to highly developed social behavior?

          5. Currently our binomial choices are:
          Dependent = Public Transportation
          Independent = Private, Car Ownership

          The 3rd option is:
          Interdependent = Shared Transportation

          6. Decreasing the convenience of parking re-prioritizes the choices.


        • Ann Hackett
          Hi Ian, You re absolutely right, walking, running, skating and cycling are all independent transport modes. My thoughts on dependent, independent, and
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 2, 2010
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            Hi Ian,

            You're absolutely right, walking, running, skating and cycling are all independent transport modes. 

            My thoughts on dependent, independent, and interdependent transportation refer only to the mental frame, the underlying choice process which governs behavior.  Do I drive my car or do I use public transportation?       

            Otherwise, cars certainly are dependent as you pointed out. 

            Ann 
             



            Hi Ann, 

            We agree with most things, however, are the independent transport modes not walking, running, skating and cycling?

            Car use is increasingly dependent - on an ever dwindling number of service stations, the mechanical expertise and technology of others and the ability of local and national governments to afford road repairs.  Already in the US, paved roads are being returned to gravel roads as local governments can no longer afford road repairs.  Roads are built with ever increasingly expensive oil... and increasingly owned privately and paid for through tolls.

            I think that many will be redefining car ownership in the near future.

            How long before the view of the car tips from a form of transport of independence to one of dependence?

            Ian


            On Sun, Aug 1, 2010 at 9:11 PM, eric britton <eric.britton@...> wrote:
             

            From: Ann Hackett [mailto:aha@...]
            Sent: Sunday, 01 August, 2010 20:53

            Some thoughts on "Old Mobility = mechanical solutions to biological
            problems."

            1. "Why the narrow binomial choices...?" We're a product of our
            conditioning through experience, education and advertising.

            2. Those "mechanistic approaches" to maintaining our current system
            have caused problems for users and our environment but have served those
            who benefit from these approaches very well and they don't want it to be
            fixed. Look at profits, advertising budgets, tax revenue, etc...

            3. Search for "ants + transportation" and "Ant Colony Algorithm" and
            find evidence in favor of biological traffic organization by ants with
            their highly developed social behavior.

            4. How to get a shift in character, away from artificially created
            desires of independence to highly developed social behavior?

            5. Currently our binomial choices are:
            Dependent = Public Transportation
            Independent = Private, Car Ownership

            The 3rd option is:
            Interdependent = Shared Transportation

            6. Decreasing the convenience of parking re-prioritizes the choices.





          • Richard Layman
            the funny thing about your accurate assessment, 5. Currently our binomial choices are: Dependent = Public Transportation Independent = Private, Car Ownership
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 3, 2010
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              the funny thing about your accurate assessment,

              5. Currently our binomial choices are:
              Dependent = Public Transportation
              Independent = Private, Car Ownership

              The 3rd option is:
              Interdependent = Shared Transportation

              Is that the reality is that private transport is dependent on public subsidy at a far greater rate than the so called dependent public transportation.  Even editorials in Mass Transit magazine, a trade publication for the industry in the U.S. absolutely and completely miss this point.

              The issue is between public, mass, or personal/individual transit, and what you need in order to accomplish it.  Even walking requires shoes (mostly) and sidewalks and trails and roadsides in order to be able to be comfortably accomplished.

              The real problem, irrespective of letting roads devolve to gravel (which is of minimal impact in terms of where most miles are driven nationally and regionally), is that automobilists believe that the 50% cost of roads not paid for by taxes and fees are paid for by the fees and taxes they pay, that the parking spot they use for free or pay for minimally does not cost something nor represent opportunity costs (e.g., in DC people pay less than $20 for residential parking permits for spaces that are worth between one and two thousand dollars), that at least 50% of the U.S. military budget is likely to cover maintaining access to international oil supplies, and influences international relations and diplomacy in ways that put the U.S. at significant risk (cf. Al-Qaeda), etc.

              walking, biking and transit are interdependent modes, and they are examples of the network effect of increasing positive returns as the modes are used more, although transit has an issue because as it is used significantly more, greater investments must be made in rolling stock and personnel and the network usually should be extended as well.

              As more people walk, more people walk and drive less.  As more people bicycle, bicycling becomes safer, cars drive more slowly, sustainable mode split increases, car congestion reduces.  But as bike mode split increases to significant levels, again changes need to be made--the use of precious roadway needs to be better balanced between the modes and managed in a manner that fosters optimal use of resources.

              etc.

              --- On Mon, 8/2/10, Ann Hackett <aha@...> wrote:

              From: Ann Hackett <aha@...>
              Subject: Re: [NewMobilityCafe] "Old Mobility = mechanical solutions to biological problems"
              To: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, August 2, 2010, 6:42 PM

               

              Hi Ian,

              You're absolutely right, walking, running, skating and cycling are all independent transport modes. 

              My thoughts on dependent, independent, and interdependent transportation refer only to the mental frame, the underlying choice process which governs behavior.  Do I drive my car or do I use public transportation?       

              Otherwise, cars certainly are dependent as you pointed out. 

              Ann 
               



              Hi Ann, 


              We agree with most things, however, are the independent transport modes not walking, running, skating and cycling?

              Car use is increasingly dependent - on an ever dwindling number of service stations, the mechanical expertise and technology of others and the ability of local and national governments  to afford road repairs.  Already in the US, paved roads are being returned to gravel roads as local governments  can no longer afford road repairs.  Roads are built with ever increasingly expensive oil... and increasingly owned privately and paid for through tolls.

              I think that many will be redefining car ownership in the near future.

              How long before the view of the car tips from a form of transport of independence to one of dependence?

              Ian


              On Sun, Aug 1, 2010 at 9:11 PM, eric britton <eric.britton@ ecoplan.org> wrote:
               

              From: Ann Hackett [mailto:aha@pacific. net]
              Sent: Sunday, 01 August, 2010 20:53

              Some thoughts on "Old Mobility = mechanical solutions to biological
              problems."

              1. "Why the narrow binomial choices...?" We're a product of our
              conditioning through experience, education and advertising.

              2. Those "mechanistic approaches" to maintaining our current system
              have caused problems for users and our environment but have served those
              who benefit from these approaches very well and they don't want it to be
              fixed. Look at profits, advertising budgets, tax revenue, etc...

              3. Search for "ants + transportation" and "Ant Colony Algorithm" and
              find evidence in favor of biological traffic organization by ants with
              their highly developed social behavior.

              4. How to get a shift in character, away from artificially created
              desires of independence to highly developed social behavior?

              5. Currently our binomial choices are:
              Dependent = Public Transportation
              Independent = Private, Car Ownership

              The 3rd option is:
              Interdependent = Shared Transportation

              6. Decreasing the convenience of parking re-prioritizes the choices.






            • joshua odeleye
              This analogy is interesting.However, i am of the opinion that the new mobility is going to be more cost-effective and environmentally friendly than the old
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 3, 2010
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                This analogy is interesting.However, i am of the opinion that the new mobility is going to be more cost-effective and environmentally friendly than the old mobility.However, been able to aggregate appropriately the % of transportation planning process,especially in urban centres, that should be based on old and new mobility orders,since the two approches are closely related,would help the world  fast-track the realization of sustainable  transport options.
                Regards,
                Joshua Odeleye
                School of Transport
                Lagos State University
                Ojo,Lagos,NIGERIA 

                --- On Sun, 8/1/10, eric britton <eric.britton@...> wrote:

                From: eric britton <eric.britton@...>
                Subject: [NewMobilityCafe] "Old Mobility = mechanical solutions to biological problems"
                To: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com, WorldTransport@yahoogroups.com, xTransit@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Sunday, August 1, 2010, 4:11 PM

                 
                From: Ann Hackett [mailto:aha@...]
                Sent: Sunday, 01 August, 2010 20:53

                Some thoughts on "Old Mobility = mechanical solutions to biological
                problems."

                1. "Why the narrow binomial choices...?" We're a product of our
                conditioning through experience, education and advertising.

                2. Those "mechanistic approaches" to maintaining our current system
                have caused problems for users and our environment but have served those
                who benefit from these approaches very well and they don't want it to be
                fixed. Look at profits, advertising budgets, tax revenue, etc...

                3. Search for "ants + transportation" and "Ant Colony Algorithm" and
                find evidence in favor of biological traffic organization by ants with
                their highly developed social behavior.

                4. How to get a shift in character, away from artificially created
                desires of independence to highly developed social behavior?

                5. Currently our binomial choices are:
                Dependent = Public Transportation
                Independent = Private, Car Ownership

                The 3rd option is:
                Interdependent = Shared Transportation

                6. Decreasing the convenience of parking re-prioritizes the choices.


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