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Netherlands govt. approves kilometer tax for private vehicles

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  • Todd Edelman, Green Idea Factory
    http://www.dutchnews.nl/news/archives/2009/11/cabinet_finalises_road_pricing.php Dutch Cabinet finalises kilometer tax plan Monday 16 November 2009 The
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 16, 2009
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      http://www.dutchnews.nl/news/archives/2009/11/cabinet_finalises_road_pricing.php

      Dutch Cabinet finalises kilometer tax plan

      Monday 16 November 2009

      The Netherlands is set to become the first country in Europe to replace road tax with a kilometer charge for all motorists, over 10 years since the idea was first put forward.

      If the legislation is passed by parliament, motorists will start paying tax on every kilometer they drive, which the government hopes will reduce traffic jams and pollution.

      On Friday, ministers agreed that the tax will be three cents a kilometer when the charge is introduced in 2012, rising to 6.7 cents by 2018 - for the greenest cars . But if revenues generated by the tax are not in line with expectations, the tax can be adjusted, the transport ministry said.

      Rush hour

      The tax will be higher during the rush hour and for more polluting vehicles.

      To make sure motorists are not worse off, road tax will be scrapped and the purchase tax on new cars will be reduced. Some 60% of drivers will be better off, the government claims.

      The transport ministry said on Friday it expected fatal accidents will fall by 7% and carbon emissions would be down by 10%. Traffic jams will be halved and the amount of kilometres driven will go down by 15%.

      Each car on the roads will be fitted with a GPS device which will use satellites to monitor where and when the car is driven and send the information to a central billing point.

      Privacy

      The ministry said the information collected about motoring habits would be 'legally and technically' protected and would not be accessible to other government agencies.

      The ANWB motoring organisation and green groups welcomed the final go-ahead for the kilometer tax. At last it means 'a fair cost for mobility,' ANWB director Guido van Woerkom told the Volkskrant.

      But some opposition MPs say the tax will be used by the government to generate extra income and is a danger to privacy.

      'Even in the former Soviet Union they did not have as much control,' Liberal VVD MP Charlie Aptrots said in the Telegraaf.

      Aptrots said the government should put the estimated €4bn start-up cost for the scheme into improving the road network and other anti-congestion measures.


      -- 
      --------------------------------------------
      
      Todd Edelman
      Green Idea Factory
      
      Urbanstr. 45
      D-10967 Berlin
      Germany
      
      Skype: toddedelman
      Mobile: ++49 0162 814 4081
      
      edelman@...
      www.greenidea.eu
      www.flickr.com/photos/edelman
      
      CAR* is over. If you want it.
      
      "Fort mit der Privatautostadt und was Neues hingebaut!" 
      - B. Brecht (with slight modification)
      
      * "Car" is a sub-category of automobile, i.e. one used inappropriately, opportunistically or without creativity
    • Ashok Sreenivas
      Interesting. But how would this differ from just taxing gasoline/diesel? Is it because this applies only to motorists (and thus excludes buses etc.) and
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 16, 2009
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        Interesting. But how would this differ from just taxing gasoline/diesel? Is it because this applies only to motorists (and thus excludes buses etc.) and because this can vary with time-of-day? I am also curious to know how something like this would get implemented. Would motorists be expected to report the no of kms they drove in the last year and pay up, or would all vehicles have a smart card or chip on them which would directly beam the data to the tax authorities?

        Thanks.

        Ashok

        On 16/11/2009 9:36 PM, Todd Edelman, Green Idea Factory wrote:
         

        http://www.dutchnew s.nl/news/ archives/ 2009/11/cabinet_ finalises_ road_pricing. php

        Dutch Cabinet finalises kilometer tax plan

        Monday 16 November 2009

        The Netherlands is set to become the first country in Europe to replace road tax with a kilometer charge for all motorists, over 10 years since the idea was first put forward.

        If the legislation is passed by parliament, motorists will start paying tax on every kilometer they drive, which the government hopes will reduce traffic jams and pollution.

        On Friday, ministers agreed that the tax will be three cents a kilometer when the charge is introduced in 2012, rising to 6.7 cents by 2018 - for the greenest cars . But if revenues generated by the tax are not in line with expectations, the tax can be adjusted, the transport ministry said.

        Rush hour

        The tax will be higher during the rush hour and for more polluting vehicles.

        To make sure motorists are not worse off, road tax will be scrapped and the purchase tax on new cars will be reduced. Some 60% of drivers will be better off, the government claims.

        The transport ministry said on Friday it expected fatal accidents will fall by 7% and carbon emissions would be down by 10%. Traffic jams will be halved and the amount of kilometres driven will go down by 15%.

        Each car on the roads will be fitted with a GPS device which will use satellites to monitor where and when the car is driven and send the information to a central billing point.

        Privacy

        The ministry said the information collected about motoring habits would be 'legally and technically' protected and would not be accessible to other government agencies.

        The ANWB motoring organisation and green groups welcomed the final go-ahead for the kilometer tax. At last it means 'a fair cost for mobility,' ANWB director Guido van Woerkom told the Volkskrant.

        But some opposition MPs say the tax will be used by the government to generate extra income and is a danger to privacy.

        'Even in the former Soviet Union they did not have as much control,' Liberal VVD MP Charlie Aptrots said in the Telegraaf.

        Aptrots said the government should put the estimated €4bn start-up cost for the scheme into improving the road network and other anti-congestion measures.


        -- 
        ------------ --------- --------- --------- -----
        
        Todd Edelman
        Green Idea Factory
        
        Urbanstr. 45
        D-10967 Berlin
        Germany
        
        Skype: toddedelman
        Mobile: ++49 0162 814 4081
        
        edelman@greenidea. eu
        www.greenidea. eu
        www.flickr.com/ photos/edelman
        
        CAR* is over. If you want it.
        
        "Fort mit der Privatautostadt und was Neues hingebaut!" 
        - B. Brecht (with slight modification)
        
        * "Car" is a sub-category of automobile, i.e. one used inappropriately, opportunistically or without creativity
      • John Mayson
        On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 9:47 PM, Ashok Sreenivas ... Proposals in the USA and UK have suggested using GPS. I haven t decided how I feel about this. California
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 17, 2009
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          On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 9:47 PM, Ashok Sreenivas
          <ashok.sreenivas@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Interesting. But how would this differ from just taxing gasoline/diesel? Is it because this applies only to motorists (and thus excludes buses etc.) and because this can vary with time-of-day? I am also curious to know how something like this would get implemented. Would motorists be expected to report the no of kms they drove in the last year and pay up, or would all vehicles have a smart card or chip on them which would directly beam the data to the tax authorities?

          Proposals in the USA and UK have suggested using GPS.

          I haven't decided how I feel about this. California has looked into
          it because so many residents are driving fuel efficient vehicles that
          their fuel tax revenue has fallen. A per distance tax would solve
          that, but people no longer have a strong incentive to drive fuel
          efficient vehicles, particularly in high-tax nations like the UK and
          Holland.

          I'm not sure how they would handle drivers from other countries.
          Would a Belgian driver need to stop at the border and get a GPS unit?
          Would they simply have to pay a high price at the pump?

          John

          --
          John Mayson <john@...>
          Austin, Texas, USA
        • Theo Schmidt
          ... At current levels, fuel prices are only a small part of motoring prices. They would need to be taxed much higher than today, which is politically
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 18, 2009
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            Ashok Sreenivas schrieb:
            > > http://www.dutchnews.nl/news/archives/2009/11/cabinet_finalises_road_pricing.php
            >
            > Interesting. But how would this differ from just taxing gasoline/diesel?
            At current levels, fuel prices are only a small part of motoring prices.
            They would need to be "taxed" much higher than today, which is
            politically impossible. "Smart" road-pricing via GPS can also take local
            and temporal variations into account and the same equipment can also
            help with safety assessment for insurance purposes. This might curb
            things like speeding excesses dramatically but would also allow
            insurance costs to be levied per distance, which would encourage
            not-driving. In contrast, today's methods encourage driving, because
            costs per distance are lower when tax and insurance is paid in a lump
            sum per vehicle each year. Against the electronic road-pricing scheme
            are of course the "Big Brother" implications.

            Interesting that this comes from the Netherlands. Looking at data from
            2006, this and other Benelux countries consume about as much oil per
            capita as the North American countries, only the oil-producing Arab
            states are worse.

            Theo Schmidt, Switzerland
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