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What lessons can America learn from the rest of the world . . .?

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  • Conrad Wagner,
    Hi Eric Letter from Switzerland: Think of a New American Mobility Culture where there is an interrelated connection between: like a triangle moving along the
    Message 1 of 29 , Jan 15, 2009

      Hi Eric

       

      Letter from Switzerland :

       

      Think of a New American Mobility Culture where there is an interrelated connection between: like a triangle moving along the timeline:

      1.     Providers … sort of a platform managed by cities (Public) and major corporations (Private) … Public-Private Partnership … also in charge of railroads/stations and roads/parking

      2.     Suppliers … operators and distributors that lead collective and individual traffic … in charge of running trains, bus, etc. and cars, bicycle, etc. and distributing mobility packages via Mobility Management and Mobility Centers

      3.     Customers … are shopping traffic means and traffic/trips … selecting individually from a whole range of offers (= see our Menu today) …. Mobility Shopping Center / One Stop Shopping

       

      New Mobility and New Mobility Services are interesting and challenging …  They are comparable to a chocolate shelf in the supermarket. You always have a great choice on a full variety of chocolate. You select according to your (rational and emotional) needs. Enabling technologies (Internet, SmartCard, MobilePhone, etc.) and educated customers (Web 2.0) trigger those developments …

       

      Eric, We should definitely get a group together to have workshops on these issues, strategies and developments.

      Communities, cities, counties, states and federal institutions can provide investment and sites for application … pilots, evaluation and standard development of concept and operation …

       

      Conrad Wagner, w@...,  Mobility Systems, Switzerland

       

       

       

    • Gladwyn d'Souza, godsouza@mac.com
      Message from California: (California being as international as anything in America so here is one idea) Change the way we finance infrastrucutre based on the
      Message 2 of 29 , Jan 15, 2009

        Message from California: (California being as international as anything in America so here is one idea)

        Change the way we finance infrastrucutre based on the efficiency model that CA has applied to energy-  By tier pricing energy after a sustainable limit, California was able to reduce the demand and not build additional supply or extend the grid. Demand is managed with price signals. New distributed generation by private producers have also reduced demand. Much more efficiency is available in the system. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1869224-3,00.html   

        We should use the same model for all infrastructure including transport from roads to rail to ports. The goal would be to reduce green house gases and allow economic activity to adjust to new transportation costs. Allow a sustainable limit- buses and 3 plus occupant cars are the lowest cost tier. After that everyone pays more, with the SOV being the highest. On trains charge higher prices during the commute period. Ships pay more based on dock time. Use the revenue, it must be substantial, for self-sufficient transport modes enhancement and low income bus service on a sustainable hierarchy- walking enhancements get the most money followed by bicycling, etc. Pricing is adjusted to make demand meet GHG goals.


        ·         Gladwyn d'Souza, godsouza@..., Coalition for Alternatives in Transportation, San Mateo County, www.catsmeo.org , United States of America



      • Robert F. Anderson, RAnderson@vectorworks
        Message from Maryland: Educational Infrastructure For Safe Cycling In US Much has been made of the additional physical infrastructure needed for practical
        Message 3 of 29 , Jan 16, 2009

          Message from Maryland: Educational Infrastructure For Safe Cycling In US

           

          Much has been made of the additional physical infrastructure needed for practical bicycle commuting. Some call for bike lanes, some for separate bikeways, some for other engineering projects. However no amount of physical infrastructure will keep cyclists safe unless they have safety knowledge and the skills to navigate the streets safely. Cyclist using new physical infrastructure but lacking skills will not be safe, while skilled cyclists can be safe in any vehicular setting.

           

          Therefore, I submit that the infrastructure we need is a training infrastructure for practical bicycling skills. This training needs to be delivered in a highly localized and non-threatening channel, with a standardized curriculum, similar to the "Road I" curriculum used by the League of American Bicyclists. It should result in a certification with a picture ID that can be displayed on a bike. I believe that a good venue for the training might be public libraries, as they already have a public-education identity, and they possess sizable parking lots for basic (pre-traffic) training activities.

           

          Ultimately, training cyclists the skills they need to be safe is the most effective way to get cyclists on the road, and it can be accomplished without significant lead times.

           

          Robert F. Anderson, Integrated Practice, RAnderson@..., Columbia, MD USA

        • murray.king@xtra.co.nz
          Message from New Zealand: Get pricing right The fundamental problem affecting rail transport, passenger and freight, the world over is underpricing of roads.
          Message 4 of 29 , Jan 16, 2009

            Message from New Zealand: Get pricing right

             

            The fundamental problem affecting rail transport, passenger and freight, the world over is underpricing of roads. More sophisticated road pricing would make public transport more viable, and show the true cost of road travel and haulage.

             

            What would be useful is for America to copy and develop some of the more sophisticated schemes elsewhere. I have in mind for freight, mass-distance pricing like the German scheme or the one we have had here in New Zealand for many years, with the addition of modern techniques like electronic measurement (using GPS) and electronic payment. For passenger, the cordon pricing schemes like London and Singapore would be a good start, but in reality they are crude.

             

            What would be really useful in cities is also an electronic system that can discriminate by time of day, type of road, vehicle, etc. With such a system the true cost of using the roads, especially at peaks, can be sheeted home to the motorist.

             

             

            Murray King, Murray King & Francis Small Consultancy Ltd, murray.king@..., Wellington , New Zealand .

             

          • eric britton
            Message from India: Basics are being sidelined Worldwide basics are being sidelined, and not only in the United States. The blind application of BRT in Indian
            Message 5 of 29 , Jan 16, 2009

              Message from India: Basics are being sidelined

               

              Worldwide basics are being sidelined, and not only in the United States. The blind application of BRT in Indian cities is an example. Some basics worth remembering -

               

              1)     Busways are warranted as per studies on routes 70-90% saturated. Bus lanes on non-saturated roads do not improve speeds as buses run fast without lanes (as road is not saturated).

               

              2)     To best inform if a road is saturated one needs a basic bus-based PT available. Many Indian cities running after BRT have symbolic (rudimentary) bus services. People are thus in personal vehicles and producing a false impression of roads being saturated.

               

              3)     Bus stops in close proximity to where people live and work save on time. BRT and Metro rails are far and few in between and do not save on journey times as people walk several minutes to get to the embarking points. It takes 8 minutes to walk 500 meters (16 if you double it to 1 km). In contrast a London or Mumbai style traditional bus service oft has stops at doorsteps. These buses may not go on dedicated median bus routes but drop you as close as possible to ones destination and in doing so keep overall travel time (by reducing time taken to walk) comparable to what BRT and Metro systems offer.

               

              4)     Speed of travel becomes important only when commutes get long. In many cities where commutes are between 8 to 15 km, doubling speed shaves of very little time (at cost of increasing risks).

               

              What the world (not just US) needs is to remember that all we ever needed to know we learnt in kindergarten - stick to the basics. Complex problems can have simple solutions.

               

               

              Dr. Adhiraj Joglekar, Psychiatrist, adhiraj.joglekar@..., www.driving-india.blogspot.com, Mumbai/Pune India (and often London)

            • Anthony Perl, aperl@sfu.ca
              Message from Canada: Sustainable airport strategies It is the redesign of airports like CDG, Amsterdam, Frankfurt, Zurich, and others into travel ports where
              Message 6 of 29 , Jan 19, 2009

                Message from Canada:

                 

                Sustainable airport strategies

                 

                It is the redesign of airports like CDG, Amsterdam, Frankfurt, Zurich,

                and others into 'travel ports' where high-speed and other forms of

                intercity and regional rail are fully integrated into the

                infrastructure.This gives Europe the ability to transition beyond

                aviation as a primary mode of intercity travel in the 500 - 1000 km.

                range, something that is going to have to happen very quickly.  Though

                the EasyJets and Ryanairs are still out there, offering perhaps the

                world's most unsustainable mobility arrangements today, Europe has the

                infrastructure in place to fully shift away from that model - as has

                already happened between London and Paris, Paris and Brussels, and among

                the Benelux and many German travel markets.  This means that European

                airports can have a future - serving rail passengers, and also the

                subset of travelers who connect between rail and long haul (>1,000 km)

                air, which will still be a part of the transport system throughout our

                lifetimes.

                 

                Not a penny should be spent on another runway or terminal expansion in

                the US (or in the UK either, such as the plan for Heathrow) without

                first adding a fully integrated intercity rail station in the heart of

                the existing terminals.  In the US, only Philadelphia and South Bend

                have  any such rail infrastructure.  The other rail connections are all

                light rail, metro or off site regional rail stops.  Several tens of

                billions could profitably be invested in changing this situation.

                 

                Anthony Perl, aperl@...

                Director Urban Studies Program, Simon Fraser University, www.sfu.ca/urban/

                Vancouver Canada

                 

                 

                 

                 

                 

              • mc.kroon@hetnet.nl
                Message from the Netherlands Subject: Reducing Size, Weight, Power and Speed of Vehicles most urgent solution to America s oil addiction In Europe and North
                Message 7 of 29 , Jan 19, 2009

                  Message from the Netherlands

                   

                  Subject: Reducing Size, Weight, Power and Speed of Vehicles most urgent solution to America's oil addiction 

                   

                  In Europe and North America car manufacturers keep themselves and consumers captive in an endless upgrading of every car model in size, power and performance. Through costly add-on technology manufacturers try to improve both fuel efficiency and performance. Nevertheless, growth trends - in all size classes - have offset most technological improvements towards energy efficiency. In Europe today's middle class family cars averaging 140 HP/1400 kg and >200 km/h top speed easily outperform classic sports cars. In three decades (two for diesel) average power levels have doubled! Not consumer demand but supply side marketing priorities ("more = better") made all size classes upgrade at least two grades. Recently, some downsizing of engine size has begun (still rising power) reducing test cycle CO2 emissions, but hardly real time fuel use. Reducing dimensions, weight, engine displacement and - most of all - less power is the most cost-effective way of reducing fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.

                   

                  For America's beefy car fleet there is not substitute for downsizing! All American car and light truck model classes need reductions up to 50 percent, to start with cubic inches (engine displacement), horsepower, body dimensions and weight. Hybridizing is okay, but downsizing is a major step towards sustainability.

                   

                  Ahead of their time European transport ministers agreed, in ECMT’s 1991 ministerial meeting, on a Resolution nr. 66 “on Power and Speed of Vehicles”, proclaiming the need for less powerful and speedy cars to reduce road casualties, emissions and fuel use. Since the US are now member of ECMT's successor International Transport Forum (ITF), implementing that resolution through regulatory limiting specific HP/kg ratings, top speeds and body size/weight, is what the new US administration can do - better than EU's recent deal on (soft) new car CO2 standards. EU and US governments must act because the car industry will always be captive of competition and upgrading pressures. Returning to European performance levels and vehicle dimensions of the 70s is more cost-effective than add-on technologies in reducing oil addiction, CO2 emissions and road casualties.

                   

                  Martin Kroon, mc.kroon@...

                  Formerly member of ECMT's Working Group on Transport and Environment 

                  Leiden, the Netherlands

                • Ian Perry
                  Regarding: Subject: Reducing Size, Weight, Power and Speed of Vehicles most urgent solution to America s oil addiction There is a danger in this that our
                  Message 8 of 29 , Jan 19, 2009
                    Regarding: 

                    Subject: Reducing Size, Weight, Power and Speed of Vehicles most urgent solution to America's oil addiction 

                     
                    There is a danger in this that our American friends will go out and reinvent the Nano...  It reduces the problem (or maybe not), but doesn't solve it and may lead to a delay in truly sustainable accessibility solutions being implemented.  I know, I am a puritan!

                     

                    Likewise with energy carriers such as hydrogen and batteries made of lithium etc. there are questions over where the energy to charge them will come from.  Sony laptops have recently been catching fire and the lithium batteries recalled so are they suitable for cars - particularly when we gt to using recycled batteries?  How much energy is required in the extraction (mining/quarrying) of the necessary metals and how much land will have to be devastated to provide enough material for the batteries we will require?  There is already talk of 'peak lithium' and those who point to the fact that there is plenty of it, forget that people and forest live above it.

                    Scarcity will ensure that a level of social exclusion will remain while ever there is a focus on private vehicles.



                    Ian

                    -----NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com wrote: -----
                    To: <NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com>, <sustran-discuss@...>
                    From:
                    Sent by: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: 01/19/2009 02:55PM
                    Subject: [NewMobilityCafe] What lessons can America learn from the rest of the world . . .?

                    Message from the Netherlands

                     

                    Subject: Reducing Size, Weight, Power and Speed of Vehicles most urgent solution to America's oil addiction 

                     

                    In Europe and North America car manufacturers keep themselves and consumers captive in an endless upgrading of every car model in size, power and performance. Through costly add-on technology manufacturers try to improve both fuel efficiency and performance. Nevertheless, growth trends - in all size classes - have offset most technological improvements towards energy efficiency. In Europe today's middle class family cars averaging 140 HP/1400 kg and >200 km/h top speed easily outperform classic sports cars. In three decades (two for diesel) average power levels have doubled! Not consumer demand but supply side marketing priorities ("more = better") made all size classes upgrade at least two grades. Recently, some downsizing of engine size has begun (still rising power) reducing test cycle CO2 emissions, but hardly real time fuel use. Reducing dimensions, weight, engine displacement and - most of all - less power is the most cost-effective way of reducing fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.

                     

                    For America's beefy car fleet there is not substitute for downsizing! All American car and light truck model classes need reductions up to 50 percent, to start with cubic inches (engine displacement) , horsepower, body dimensions and weight. Hybridizing is okay, but downsizing is a major step towards sustainability.

                     

                    Ahead of their time European transport ministers agreed, in ECMT’s 1991 ministerial meeting, on a Resolution nr. 66 “on Power and Speed of Vehicles”, proclaiming the need for less powerful and speedy cars to reduce road casualties, emissions and fuel use. Since the US are now member of ECMT's successor International Transport Forum (ITF), implementing that resolution through regulatory limiting specific HP/kg ratings, top speeds and body size/weight, is what the new US administration can do - better than EU's recent deal on (soft) new car CO2 standards. EU and US governments must act because the car industry will always be captive of competition and upgrading pressures. Returning to European performance levels and vehicle dimensions of the 70s is more cost-effective than add-on technologies in reducing oil addiction, CO2 emissions and road casualties.

                     

                    Martin Kroon, mc.kroon@hetnet. nl

                    Formerly member of ECMT's Working Group on Transport and Environment 

                    Leiden, the Netherlands

                  • Gardner, Geoff [mailto:Geoff.Gardner@atki
                    From: Gardner, Geoff [mailto:Geoff.Gardner@atkinsglobal.com] Message from United Kingdom Subject: Developing a Conceptual Framework for Changing Travel
                    Message 9 of 29 , Jan 20, 2009
                      What lessons can America learn from the rest of the world . . .?

                      From: Gardner, Geoff [mailto:Geoff.Gardner@...]

                       

                      Message from United Kingdom

                      Subject: Developing a Conceptual Framework for Changing Travel Behaviour

                      America and the world as a whole need advice on applying the best available behaviour change techniques to the task of improving travel choices. There is currently no effective socio-psychological model of travel choice anywhere. American psychotherapy experts and the US management schools have worldwide reputations and would create an unbeatable approach when merged with the long European tradition of encouraging users to choose alternatives to the car.

                       

                      ACT TravelWise association are a UK professional body dedicated to supporting access to goods and services without reliance on single-occupant car journeys. Even though their members include psychologists, transport planners and sociologists they admit that there is so far no universal theory to guide the provision of better travel. As a workaround model it would appear that the answer lies in a mixture of tackling the NEED to travel, improving the NETWORKS for non-car modes before tackling the NICETIES of measures to change in inclination. ACT TravelWise UK are currently seeking advice from experts worldwide, and would welcome the opportunity to participate in a US behavioural change programme.

                       

                       

                      URL http://www.acttravelwise.org/home

                       

                      Geoff Gardner:  geoff.gardner@...
                      Policy Director, ACT TravelWise

                      London, UK

                       

                    • Paul Minett [mailto:paulminett@tripconver
                      From: Paul Minett [mailto:paulminett@tripconvergence.co.nz] 1. Message from New Zealand 2. Subject line Carpoolers Need Meeting Places Not Databases 3.
                      Message 10 of 29 , Jan 20, 2009

                        From: Paul Minett [mailto:paulminett@...]

                         

                        1.     Message from New Zealand

                         

                        2.     Subject line Carpoolers Need Meeting Places Not Databases

                         

                        3.     Text: Casual car pooling in San Francisco and the slug lines in Northern Virginia/Washington DC involve 20,000 people each day forming over 6,500 single use, three person car pools, and saving almost 3 million gallons of gasoline per year.  Imagine if this system could be spread to 100 cities and operate at a similar size.  It would reduce congestion, VMT, fuel use, emissions, and public transport costs while increasing sense of community (because people in car pools talk to each other).

                         

                        The essence of casual car pooling is that there is no pre-arrangement.  The people using the system do not know each other before they share a ride.  It is as if there is a taxi stand for carpoolers, with each stand representing a different pre-determined destination.  There is no pre-commitment, and the car pool is ready when you are.

                         

                        This approach flies in the face of conventional wisdom that says people need to know each other before they will share a ride.  All efforts by transportation agencies to increase carpooling involve establishing databases for people to use on-line to find a ride-match.  Could it be that for carpooling success we need to provide meeting places, not databases?

                         

                        In New Zealand two cities have put trial flexible carpooling routes into their ‘wish list’ for the upcoming planning period.  In Washington State authorities are considering funding two carpooling routes across the SR520 bridge.  There are enough seats on the roads, we just need to get them serving the community.

                         

                         

                        4.     URL Ref: http://www.flexiblecarpooling.org

                         

                        5.     Signature block

                        Paul Minett - paulminett@...

                        Trip Convergence Ltd - www.tripconvergence.com

                        Auckland, New Zealand

                         

                         

                         

                      • Alexander Berthelsen - alexander.berthels
                        Message from Sweden Subject: Combating climate change and peak oil with free public transport We are standing at a crossroad: in order to reduce our oil
                        Message 11 of 29 , Jan 21, 2009

                          Message from Sweden

                          Subject: Combating climate change and peak oil with free public transport

                          We are standing at a crossroad: in order to reduce our oil dependency and to make our cities climate smart, we have to change our ways of getting around. It is a fact that the future is on track, and with free public transport everyone can come along for the ride.

                          So far, the local transport sector has been sadly neglected in the climate debate. Even though the inflation in car use is one of our biggest sources of greenhouse gas emissions and oil use, few cities have any serious plans to radically decrease their car traffic.

                          With just a marginal tax-raise (in Stockholm, capital of Sweden, all commuters who earns less than 5000 euros a month would benefit from this), the public transport system could be made free at the point of entry. This would lead to a decline in car-traffic and a surge in the demand for public transportation, which in turn would stimulate a much needed capacity and comfortability increase in the public transport system.

                          In cities where a free system has been introduced, such as Hasselt in Belgium, there has been an increase in passengers with about a 1000 percent as well as a large decrease in car-traffic – rendering some of the planned investments in new roads unnecessary. With the car industry crisis in mind – an expansion of the public transport system would also be beneficial because it would create jobs in a manufacturing industry with a future.

                          http://freepublictransports.com/

                          Alexander Berthelsen – alexander.berthelsen@...
                          Freepublictransports.com – http://freepublictransports.com/
                          Stockholm, Sweden

                        • Richard Layman
                          Remember that in the U.S. most local municipalities are funded solely by property and sales taxes.  Most large scale transit systems require state
                          Message 12 of 29 , Jan 21, 2009
                            Remember that in the U.S. most local municipalities are funded solely by property and sales taxes.  Most large scale transit systems require state assistance.  Most sources of taxes, at least right now, are declining (sales and gasoline and car registration taxes specifically are all declining), putting municipal budgets, especially transit systems, at great risk.  Plus, most regions in the U.S. lack the urban design and complementary land use policy that best supports transit.  As a result in many metropolitan regions, for the most part, transit doesn't go--efficiently at least--between housing centers and job centers.
                             
                            While free transit is an ideal position, and useful for laying out arguments, it's hardly something that can be suggested that is likely to be able to be widely adopted in the U.S. given the considerations discussed above.  Note that while I haven't been able to dig up the report, San Francisco studied the option of a free transit system recently and found that they lacked the money to add the necessary equipment and personnel required to adequately address increases in demand.
                             
                             
                            TRB studies of transit usage find that cost of transit is only one of the issues, and not necessarily the most important issue (usually it has to do with efficiency and convenience, as well as the quality of service).
                             
                            That being said, free transit zones in Portland, Oregon, as well as more limited versions in Seattle and Pittsburgh, as well as free intra-neighborhood transit in Tempe (Orbit) and Scottsdale Arizona do provide examples within the U.S. of how free transit can be effectively offered.  But the  issue isn't whether or not the service is free, but whether or not it is well conceived and useful, and whether or not making it free satisfies various policy objectives.
                            Richard Layman
                            Washington, DC




                            --- On Wed, 1/21/09, Alexander@... <Alexander@...> wrote:
                            From: Alexander@... <Alexander@...>
                            Subject: [NewMobilityCafe] What lessons can America learn from the rest of the world . . .?
                            To: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Wednesday, January 21, 2009, 4:30 PM

                            Message from Sweden

                            Subject: Combating climate change and peak oil with free public transport

                            We are standing at a crossroad: in order to reduce our oil dependency and to make our cities climate smart, we have to change our ways of getting around. It is a fact that the future is on track, and with free public transport everyone can come along for the ride.

                            So far, the local transport sector has been sadly neglected in the climate debate. Even though the inflation in car use is one of our biggest sources of greenhouse gas emissions and oil use, few cities have any serious plans to radically decrease their car traffic.

                            With just a marginal tax-raise (in Stockholm, capital of Sweden, all commuters who earns less than 5000 euros a month would benefit from this), the public transport system could be made free at the point of entry. This would lead to a decline in car-traffic and a surge in the demand for public transportation, which in turn would stimulate a much needed capacity and comfortability increase in the public transport system.

                            In cities where a free system has been introduced, such as Hasselt in Belgium, there has been an increase in passengers with about a 1000 percent as well as a large decrease in car-traffic – rendering some of the planned investments in new roads unnecessary. With the car industry crisis in mind – an expansion of the public transport system would also be beneficial because it would create jobs in a manufacturing industry with a future.

                            http://freepublictr ansports. com/

                            Alexander Berthelsen – alexander.berthelse n@...
                            Freepublictransport s.com – http://freepublictr ansports. com/
                            Stockholm, Sweden

                          • Joseph Szyliowicz
                            While there have been many useful suggestions concerning the relevance of the European experience, I am struck with the lack of attention paid to national
                            Message 13 of 29 , Jan 21, 2009
                              While there have been many useful suggestions concerning the relevance of the European experience, I am struck with the lack of attention paid to national level issues -- for example, 1) Which European country has achieved the best freight and passenger intermodal system? How did it do it? 2)what is the best administrative structure to develop and implement a sustainable transport policy? Does the UK or Germany or France or Holland or... have an effective and efficient organization? 2) Does any European country have a system that ensures adequate financing of its sustainability initiatives and projects?


                              Joseph S. Szyliowicz


                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Alexander@..., Berthelsen@..., -@..., alexander.berthelsen@...
                              Date: Wednesday, January 21, 2009 2:41 pm
                              Subject: [NewMobilityCafe] What lessons can America learn from the rest of the world . . .?
                              To: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com


                              > Message from Sweden
                              >
                              > Subject: Combating climate change and peak oil with free public transport
                              >
                              > We are standing at a crossroad: in order to reduce our oil dependency
                              > and to
                              > make our cities climate smart, we have to change our ways of getting
                              > around.
                              > It is a fact that the future is on track, and with free public transport
                              > everyone can come along for the ride.
                              >
                              > So far, the local transport sector has been sadly neglected in the climate
                              > debate. Even though the inflation in car use is one of our biggest sources
                              > of greenhouse gas emissions and oil use, few cities have any serious
                              > plans
                              > to radically decrease their car traffic.
                              >
                              > With just a marginal tax-raise (in Stockholm, capital of Sweden, all
                              > commuters who earns less than 5000 euros a month would benefit from this),
                              > the public transport system could be made free at the point of entry.
                              > This
                              > would lead to a decline in car-traffic and a surge in the demand for
                              > public
                              > transportation, which in turn would stimulate a much needed capacity
                              > and
                              > comfortability increase in the public transport system.
                              >
                              > In cities where a free system has been introduced, such as Hasselt in
                              > Belgium, there has been an increase in passengers with about a 1000 percent
                              > as well as a large decrease in car-traffic - rendering some of the planned
                              > investments in new roads unnecessary. With the car industry crisis in
                              > mind -
                              > an expansion of the public transport system would also be beneficial
                              > because
                              > it would create jobs in a manufacturing industry with a future.
                              >
                              > http://freepublictransports.com/
                              >
                              > Alexander Berthelsen - alexander.berthelsen@...
                              > Freepublictransports.com - http://freepublictransports.com/
                              > Stockholm, Sweden
                              >
                              >
                            • Zvi Leve
                              Message from Montreal Quebec - inspired by Bogota Colombia and elsewhere Subject: The importance of image The success or failure of transportation schemes
                              Message 14 of 29 , Jan 22, 2009
                                Message from Montreal Quebec - inspired by Bogota Colombia and elsewhere

                                Subject: The importance of image

                                The success or failure of transportation schemes depends on many factors which go far beyond technical issues such as benefit-cost measures and technical design specifications. It is extremely important to mould public perceptions of things. Planning is not a passive act - it requires the active support of the public who will be impacted by the changes.

                                Many Americans seem to think that problems of extreme poverty and social exclusion only exist in other countries. You are quite mistaken! Dependence on private motor vehicles limits access to destinations and erodes attitudes to public space. Your communities are not healthy!

                                Bogota Colombia has very little money to invest, yet they make great efforts at 'marketing' their city's services. With every change of administration the local government and agencies are 'rebranded' with a particular theme which will be emphasized for the coming years. The regional transportation authority, is responsible for regional 'mobility' not only for 'transport'! Their slogan (Movilidad: los hacemos todos) reflects this attitude: "Mobility: we do it all".

                                They work very hard at creating a 'proud' civic culture and putting context to their plans. These marketing efforts rely to a large extent on the local artistic community and often involve very creative techniques. Since 'active' support is needed, many efforts extend beyond the standard 'passive' media: street performers may act out various situations and show the results of bad decisions. City workers are provided with all kinds of 'fashion accessories' which emphasize the 'brand'. These items are actually well designed and of high quality so people are quite proud to display them.

                                There is no guaranteed recipe for success! Good results require effort and creativity.

                                Zvi Leve
                                INRO
                                Montreal, Quebec, Canada
                                zvi.leve@...


                                2009/1/15 eric britton <eric.britton@...>

                                Dear World Friends (you will see why this opening in a minute),

                                 

                                As a least some of you know there is a rather interesting project going on under the leadership of something called the National Journal in Washington, DC, where they have created an expert blog in which they've invited a couple dozen "transportation insiders" (in their words) in order to provide counseling guidelines to be transportation team of the incoming Obama administration.  You can see all about it at http://transportation.nationaljournal.com.

                                 

                                The idea is that each week the editors are asking the expert panel to respond to a question in the hope that some interesting ideas will appear there and make their way into the discussions and considerations of the incoming team at the Department of Transportation. The question that will be posted over this weekend will be the following:

                                 

                                "What lessons can America learn from the rest of the world in terms of transportation developments that are safe, efficient, cost-effective, and sustainable?

                                 

                                "We Americans often think of ourselves as sitting at the very top of the social, economic, technological, entertainment, and political pyramid.  After all, we invented human flight, the Super Bowl, the Interstate Highway, the transcontinental railroad, and Rock 'n' Roll.  But perhaps we're not as advanced as we like to think.  Perhaps innovations in transportation, land use, and energy consumption are much more evenly distributed around the world than we ever thought possible.  Indeed, perhaps America is closer to the middle or bottom of the pyramid when it comes to transportation investments.  What lessons can America learn from the rest of the world in terms of transportation developments that are safe, efficient, cost-effective, and sustainable?"

                                 

                                Since they originally invited me to join this panel, I guess in part because they think I have something to say from an international perspective, I have had a bit of a role in getting this question onto the agenda.  As those of you who know me can well imagine, I think I have something to say on this . . . however I think I have an even better idea than that, so let me share it with you.

                                 

                                Specifically, I would like to you the chance to respond to this question terms of the following routine, if you agree:

                                 

                                1.     Please address one and only one idea or topic either to me privately via eric.britton@..., or if you feel it will be of interest to the group as a whole to the New Mobility Café at NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com  (if you do this, kindly conserve the above Subject line).

                                 

                                2.     Kindly make your point in less than 250 words.

                                 

                                3.     Sign it in a succinct matter with your name, institutional affiliation, country, and e-mail.

                                 

                                4.     Allow me to edit it on the understanding that I will not denature your commentary.

                                 

                                While we don't have a lot of time for this, I for one will be extremely interested to see what kind of compilation we can make of this if we put our heads together.  I just have to think that it's going to be frightfully interesting.  And I'm sure it will tell the reader almost as much about ourselves as it does about the ideas we are addressing.  As far as I'm concerned that's okay too.  After all the solo transportation is people.

                                 

                                Let's see what happens now.

                                 

                                Eric Britton

                                 

                                 

                                  New Mobility Partnerships  http://www.newmobility.org

                                      Europe:   8/10 rue Joseph Bara,     75006 Paris,  France   

                                        T:  +331 4326 1323  or  +339 7044 4179   Skype: ericbritton

                                      USA:      9440 Readcrest Drive   Los Angeles, CA  90210      

                                        T:  +1 310 601-8468    Skype : newmobility

                                 

                                 

                                 

                                 


                              • Message from the UK
                                Message from the UK Ridesharing - -In search of the simple solution: One of the key factors attributed to the success of liftshare in the UK is the simplicity
                                Message 15 of 29 , Jan 23, 2009

                                  Message from the UK

                                   

                                  Ridesharing - -In search of the simple solution:

                                   

                                  One of the key factors attributed to the success of liftshare in the UK is the simplicity of the solution to the problems and issues faced by any organisation involved with sustainable travel.

                                   

                                  Many countries, including the USA, approach ride-sharing with the belief that multi-modal travel, incentives, vouchers and prizes will help gain members. The result of such an approach is often multi-layered complexity causing potential members to become confused and disengaged, resulting in poor membership take-up. A more complex solution does not necessarily mean a better solution!  In fact, members of ride-share schemes generally want the opposite; they have their own motives for sharing which can include reducing the cost of a commute, cutting CO2 emissions, getting to work faster or even expanding their social network. Members want to go from A to B in a private and uncomplicated way with simple member registration and the ability to find an instant journey match.

                                   

                                   Almost 1% (0.9%) of drivers in the UK have registered with the liftshare network. Why is it that the UK has such a high per capita percentage of people signing up to ride-share, compared to the US? We believe it is because of the simplicity and creativity of liftshare’s solutions.

                                   

                                  If people have made the decision to change the way they travel, they need the system to be quick and easy with instant results – avoiding lengthy processes to find a match and multiple overlapping schemes which dilute the potential results. liftshare has focused on simplicity from the start, and a decade on it still works.

                                   

                                  Joanna Parr, International Development Manager, joanna@...  

                                  liftshare  - http://www.liftshare.com/  

                                  United Kingdom

                                   

                                   

                                • Message from �World Transport�
                                  Message from World Transport Nurture and value cycling and walking Writing from the UK perspective and 30 years of work in transportation including working
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Jan 23, 2009

                                    Message from “World Transport”

                                     

                                    Nurture and value cycling and walking

                                     

                                    Writing from the UK perspective and 30 years of work in transportation including working in Germany, India, China, Australia and a dozen other countries the most important thing to nurture and value is the cyclist and the pedestrian.  These modes of transport bring significant multiple benefits including reducing car use for short journeys, reducing health damaging air pollution especially PM10/PM2.5, reducing greenhouse gases, reducing obesity, increasing physical and psychological well-being and increasing community support, cohesion and friendliness.  It’s also cheap to do. 

                                     

                                    The main things to do are to civilise motorised traffic with a  strictly enforced 20 mph speed limit in all residential areas, build segregated high quality walking and cycle routes that connect places people want to visit, make sure there is a supportive environment for all local facilities and services (shops, doctors, cafes, public offices, work places, post offices), plant millions of trees, de-commission 25% of car parking spaces and replace with children’s play areas and parks.  High quality places that reward the pedestrian and cyclists will reconnect people with each other and with nature and with happiness and willingly and enthusiastically.  

                                     

                                    The missing ingredient (so far) is political will and the USA now has the big chance to rediscover this vital ingredient.

                                     

                                     

                                    Professor John Whitelegg - j.whitelegg@...

                                    Founder and editor in chief of Journal of World Transport Policy & Practice

                                    Stockholm Environment institute, University of York (UK)

                                  • Message from Iceland
                                    Message from Iceland Make train tickets purchase and route-finding sexier than for plane-travel One reason that plane travel is too popular is that there are
                                    Message 17 of 29 , Jan 23, 2009

                                      Message from Iceland

                                       

                                      "Make train tickets purchase and route-finding sexier than for plane-travel"

                                       

                                      One reason that plane travel is too popular is that there are many easy-to use trip-plannig web applications.  Similar options for tarin travel and ideally long-distance buses need to be sexier, easier to use, more comprehensive.  The best example I can point to is: www.bahn.de , which provides service far beyond the realm of the "mother company", Deutche Bahn, the German railways.

                                       

                                       

                                      URL http://www.bahn.de/international/view/en/index.shtm l

                                       

                                       

                                      Morten Lange - morten7an@...

                                      Icelandic Cyclists' Federation  www.LHM.is  

                                      Reykjavik, Iceland

                                       

                                       

                                       

                                       

                                           

                                    • eric britton
                                      Message from USA Subject line Offset Incentives for Auto Use Transit works better in other countries than in America. Good vehicles, infrastructure, etc.,
                                      Message 18 of 29 , Jan 24, 2009

                                        Message from USA   

                                         

                                        Subject line Offset Incentives for Auto Use

                                         

                                         

                                        Transit works better in other countries than in America.   Good vehicles, infrastructure, etc., don’t offset land use patterns making transit a tough sell in most markets.  What planners see as land use economists call subsidies for auto use.  Highways and free parking are obvious examples, air pollution and congestion are less obvious, and added resources needed for policing highways and even the military also reflect the auto culture. 

                                         

                                        America can learn to subsidize auto use less, but the most practical and next best thing is easier.  User incentives are needed to offset the built-in incentives for auto use.  The US   has the tool at hand for offsetting auto incentives:  the “tax-free transit benefit” and Internal Revenue Code Section 132(f).  It’s gained increasing use in many cities, and since 2008 San Francisco employers are required to offer it. 

                                         

                                        So, the US can learn from the world that reduced auto use incentives are needed, and can get there with its home-grown tool.  Federal policy should require employers with more than 20 employees in medium and larger cities to use Section 132(f), i.e., allow employees to pay transit fares using pre-tax ssalary.  This would go far in offsetting free parking and other auto incentives that are widespread in the US.  This solution requires no invention or draconian policy.  The San Francisco experience shows employers won’t oppose this idea, because there is no cost to them (in fact, small tax savings) and considerable benefit to employees. 

                                         

                                        Richard L. Oram – Richard@...

                                        Fund for the Environment and Urban Life

                                        (The Oram Foundation, Inc.)




                                         

                                         

                                      • Message from The Netherlands
                                        Message from The Netherlands Subject: Learning from different choices for sustainable mobility design Conference, Showcasing The Netherlands and Design Battle:
                                        Message 19 of 29 , Jan 25, 2009

                                          Message from The Netherlands

                                          Subject: Learning from different choices for sustainable mobility design

                                          Conference, Showcasing The Netherlands and Design Battle: learning from different choices for sustainable mobility design New York / Amsterdam 

                                          • Amsterdam July            15 - 17, 2009
                                          • New York    September 11 - 13, 2009

                                           

                                          We invite people from companies, organizations, schools in New York (USA) and Amsterdam (The Netherlands) to participate in a Battle, Designing for sustainable mobility at the access / entry to and from Governor’s Island New York, facilitating sustainable modes of transport: walking, cycling, roller blading, jogging etc. The ‘Hudson 400 Design Battle’ event will be developed and will take place during a three day event in New York towards the end end of September 2009. On day 1 of the battle a number of teams will visit the places that require design; they will receive their instructions. Then they will develop their project in 1 1/2 day; audiences will be present and will be asked to comment. On day 3 the teams will publicly present their findings for a jury and after deliberations the jury will give their decision, specifically focussing on the developed solutions and the choices made. If the solutions will be implemented depends on decision makers in New York.

                                          The event in New York will be prepared during a one day -invitation only - Conference in Amsterdam on July 17, 2009- with prominent speakers and workshops - focussing on defining the curriculum for the ‘Amsterdam International Academy on Sustainable Mobility’. Also the ‘rules of engagement’ for the Design Battle will be discussed. The Amsterdam conference will be preceded by: ' Showcasing The Netherlands', a  hands on experience, during two days of  technical tours in and around Amsterdam.

                                          Pascal van den Noort  operations@...   

                                          Executive Director Velo Mondial, operations@... 

                                          Amsterdam, The Netherlands



                                           

                                        • Message from Canada
                                          Message from Canada Subject: It s all about choice. It has taken a century of building almost exclusively for the car to get us to our current dilemma. It
                                          Message 20 of 29 , Jan 25, 2009

                                            Message from Canada\

                                             

                                            Subject:  It’s all about choice.

                                             

                                            It has taken a century of building almost exclusively for the car to get us to our current dilemma.  It will take some considerable time to achieve long-term solutions.  Ultimately, they can only be found in the way we build our cities.  We will have to establish virtuous cycles to offset the vicious ones, where success leads to more success. 

                                             

                                            There is no single solution.  Top-down planning can never be comprehensive enough or flexible enough.  Give people enough transportation options and they can by and large work out their own solutions.  That in turn is dependent on the design and integration of land-use and transportation choices.

                                             

                                            Ideally, people should have at least five choices - feet, bike, transit, taxi/car-sharing and personal vehicle - and the ability to mix and match them appropriate to the kind of trip and the circumstances faced.  The combinations and the mix make it all work.

                                             

                                            The trip is only a few blocks?  Walking is best.  It's raining?  Grab a taxi.  The trip is around five kilometres?  Cycling may be the faster alternative.  Going to a town centre in the suburbs?  Try transit.  Heading out of town?  Train, perhaps - or car.  Yes, the car is perfectly appropriate for many trips, but not all.  Once the car is used less frequently, needs may be met more affordably by a car sharing or the occasional rental, with considerable savings.

                                             

                                            Of course, the provision of alternatives assumes a city designed around more than the car -and a citizenry comfortable with the choices.  In the end, the answers are found in the plans we have to implement.  Concentrate growth.  Build complete communities.  Provide transportation choice. 

                                             

                                            But to do so, we will first have to be aware of the impediments to success, rooted in the unrealistic beliefs and assumptions we have associated with the success of the car.

                                             

                                            Gordon Price, pricetags@...
                                            Director of the City Program,
                                            Simon Fraser University, http://www.pricetags.ca/

                                            Vancouver, Canada

                                          • Message from the UK
                                            Message from the UK Subject: Community Safety Drives save fuel, money and lives and change attitudes Community Safety Drives aim to introduce, refresh and
                                            Message 21 of 29 , Jan 27, 2009

                                              Message from the UK

                                               

                                              Subject: "Community Safety Drives save fuel, money and lives and change attitudes"

                                               

                                               

                                              Community Safety Drives aim to introduce, refresh and develop safer eco-driving skills and attitudes in order to reduce road casualties and carbon emissions on high road casualty risk routes used by local people and regular commuters.

                                               

                                              Following a spate of fatal and serious crashes between 2001-2002 on the A37, a 17 mile stretch of road linking Dorchester and Yeovil, local people and commuters demanded better enforcement and improved highway engineering measures. The response from Dorset County Council was that local people and commuters were crashing on local roads because of their lack of road awareness and poor driving attitude and skill. Increased enforcement found local people and regular commuters were the main culprits.

                                               

                                              The Council in partnership with local communities, politicians and businesses  set about developing and delivering a free eco-safe driving scheme aimed at local people and those who were regular users of the route. Drivers were offered a free 90 minute in-car coaching session using their own vehicle or a driving instructor's vehicle to learn how to drive the route safely and economically without the threat of a test or assessment in a friendly atmosphere. The local media were key to successfully promoting the initiative locally and encouraging some 150 local people of all ages from towns and villages along the route to take part as "guinea-pigs". Combined with short-term enhanced high-profile visible policing and small-scale highway improvements along the route, the initiative, "A37 Community Safety Drive" saw an immediate drop in road crashes, which has been sustained to this day. A 70% reduction in fatal and serious crashes has been achieved and sustained. A major local employer now uses the "Community Safety Drive" route to regularly refresh the driving skills and attitudes of its employees who drive for work purposes.

                                               

                                              Other local high-risk routes across the county of Dorset are now the subject of this approach combining the three "E's" of enforcement, engineering and education with "encouragement and local community engagement."

                                               

                                              A spin-off is the " Parent Safety Drive" which adopts the same principles but targets parents on the school-run and encourages safer eco-driving

                                              techniques with a twist. The twist being that the parent drivers are shown the benefits of adopting a "park and walk" approach as opposed to trying to fight and negotiate their way around other school-run driving parents in close proximity to school.

                                               

                                              Feedback from all those participating has been extremely positive and funding is being sought to expand the "free" programme to other

                                              communities.

                                               

                                               

                                              Robert Smith, Network Traffic Safety Team Manager, r.smith@...

                                              Dorset County Council

                                              Dorchester,  Dorset,UK

                                               

                                            • eric britton
                                              Message from the UK School Travel Health Check – The evidence based approach. The UK is seen as the lead when it comes to the development of School Travel
                                              Message 22 of 29 , Jan 28, 2009
                                                Message from the UK
                                                  
                                                  
                                                School Travel Health Check – The evidence based approach.
                                                  
                                                 
                                                The UK is seen as the lead when it comes to the development of School Travel Plans as a mechanism for achieving modal shift away from single occupancy car use for the journey to school.  It is likely that this approach will be considered for the
                                                 US .  
                                                  
                                                Unfortunately, although we are many years in and in excess of £140 million in to the programme we are failing to make best use of the rich data source available to us at the national level: School Census, on an annual basis captures origin, destination and mode of travel for the majority of children in state education – we do not have to model travel behaviour – we know it!
                                                  
                                                In the
                                                 UK , through the local development of the School Travel Health Check process individual authorities have been linking together to mine this rich data source and to produce ‘school friendly’ map based output that forms a solid foundation for the development of School Travel Plans and the SMART targets they should contain. As well as proving very popular with schools it has also been designed to be accessible to parents and policy makers.
                                                  
                                                My point?  Before you start on any School Travel Plan style programme get your foundations right at the national level (you will have similar data sources).  
                                                  
                                                Better still, the School Travel Health Check approach is scaleable, financially sustainable and it works!
                                                  
                                                Examples of School Census processing and the School Travel Health Check ‘in action’ can be seen at:
                                                http://www.viewfinder.infomapper.com/dorset/resources (Do feel free to browse through the other folders and to contact me for more info.)
                                                  
                                                Andrew Combes, Andrew@...
                                                Council Sustainable Travel Coordinator 
                                                Dorset County UK
                                                  
                                                  

                                                 

                                                 

                                              • eric britton
                                                Message from Canada Mobility Matters - Reducing car use on a long term basis Program encourages people to reduce car use on a long term basis, and promotes
                                                Message 23 of 29 , Jan 28, 2009

                                                  Message from Canada

                                                   

                                                  Mobility Matters – Reducing car use on a long term basis

                                                   

                                                  Program encourages people to reduce car use on a long term basis, and promotes more sustainable and active transportation choices. Links car disposal services with transportation planning, using a community/neighbourhood organizing approach. 

                                                   

                                                  Transportation demand management studies show that people are more inclined to make lasting changes in their transportation choices if they have access to travel planning services that help them to understand and better utilize the full range of mobility options available to them. Mobility Matters encourages car owners to either relinquish their car or offset the GHG emissions from car use, in exchange for individualized travel planning services and incentives that support sustainable transportation changes.


                                                  Participants donate their car to BEST (a local non-profit that promotes sustainable transportation and land use planning), who then resells newer model cars for revenue, and provides the participant with a tax receipt, or organizes disposal of end-of-life cars through a recycling company. Participants receive membership to the local carshare operator (Co-Operative Auto Network) and customized travel planning services and incentives that are tailored to meet their specific lifestyle and transportation usage needs (these may include combinations of ride sharing, telecommuting, trip combining, transit, walking and cycling). The Coop Auto Network will put a fleet car in each neighbourhood that achieves 15 households signing up with Mobility Matters.

                                                   

                                                  Those not wishing to part with a car can participate by purchasing carbon off-sets for their vehicle use. All participants have access to a Mobility Matters members-only website that offers trip planning and GHG emissions calculators, and connects them to other program participants, and other benefits.

                                                   

                                                  BEST derives revenue from the resale of cars taken in through the car sale option, from the resale of the older, end-of-life cars taken in through the car recycling option, and from the sale of offsets.  This revenue will be used to support BEST’s ongoing efforts to increase access to trip planning tools and education on the range of travel options available.  This will further support long-term commitments to reduce vehicle use.

                                                   

                                                   

                                                   

                                                  Margaret Mahan, Executive Director, margaret@...

                                                  BEST - Better Environmentally Sound Transportation, www.best.bc.ca

                                                  Vancouver, Canada      

                                                   

                                                   

                                                • Richard Layman
                                                  I saw Peter Newman speak yesterday on his new co-authored book, _Resilient City_.  (www.resilientcitybook.org)  It looks to be pretty seminal.  His
                                                  Message 24 of 29 , Jan 28, 2009
                                                    I saw Peter Newman speak yesterday on his new co-authored book, _Resilient City_.  (www.resilientcitybook.org)  It looks to be pretty seminal.  His presentation is supposed to be online.
                                                     
                                                    While I haven't yet read Eric's paper that he sent around today, I have been thinking for awhile that new mobility is really about great places.
                                                     
                                                    Prof. Newman had a bunch of acronyms to describe the necessary changes..  First was TOD.  Second was POD.
                                                     
                                                    In the book they term POD as pedestrian and bicycle centric development.
                                                     
                                                    POD really ought to be "place oriented development" and it should encompass the mobility concepts of TOD and complete streets, but as the overarching concept, because at the root of all, we want to have great places where we can live, work, visit, learn, and play.
                                                     
                                                    RL



                                                    --- On Wed, 1/28/09, eric britton <eric.britton@...> wrote:
                                                    From: eric britton <eric.britton@...>
                                                    Subject: [NewMobilityCafe] What lessons can America learn from the rest of the world . . .?
                                                    To: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com
                                                    Date: Wednesday, January 28, 2009, 1:24 PM

                                                    Message from Canada

                                                     

                                                    Mobility Matters – Reducing car use on a long term basis

                                                     

                                                    Program encourages people to reduce car use on a long term basis, and promotes more sustainable and active transportation choices. Links car disposal services with transportation planning, using a community/neighbour hood organizing approach. 

                                                     

                                                    Transportation demand management studies show that people are more inclined to make lasting changes in their transportation choices if they have access to travel planning services that help them to understand and better utilize the full range of mobility options available to them. Mobility Matters encourages car owners to either relinquish their car or offset the GHG emissions from car use, in exchange for individualized travel planning services and incentives that support sustainable transportation changes.


                                                    Participants donate their car to BEST (a local non-profit that promotes sustainable transportation and land use planning), who then resells newer model cars for revenue, and provides the participant with a tax receipt, or organizes disposal of end-of-life cars through a recycling company. Participants receive membership to the local carshare operator (Co-Operative Auto Network) and customized travel planning services and incentives that are tailored to meet their specific lifestyle and transportation usage needs (these may include combinations of ride sharing, telecommuting, trip combining, transit, walking and cycling). The Coop Auto Network will put a fleet car in each neighbourhood that achieves 15 households signing up with Mobility Matters..

                                                     

                                                    Those not wishing to part with a car can participate by purchasing carbon off-sets for their vehicle use. All participants have access to a Mobility Matters members-only website that offers trip planning and GHG emissions calculators, and connects them to other program participants, and other benefits.

                                                     

                                                    BEST derives revenue from the resale of cars taken in through the car sale option, from the resale of the older, end-of-life cars taken in through the car recycling option, and from the sale of offsets.  This revenue will be used to support BEST’s ongoing efforts to increase access to trip planning tools and education on the range of travel options available.  This will further support long-term commitments to reduce vehicle use.

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                    Margaret Mahan, Executive Director, margaret@best. bc.ca

                                                    BEST - Better Environmentally Sound Transportation, www.best.bc. ca

                                                    Vancouver, Canada      

                                                     

                                                     

                                                  • Message from France:
                                                    Message from France: The route to a global mobility policy Over the past decade, France has been one of the leading forces in the development of public
                                                    Message 25 of 29 , Jan 30, 2009

                                                      Message from France:

                                                       

                                                      The route to a global mobility policy

                                                       

                                                      Over the past decade, France has been one of the leading forces in the development of public transportation initiatives, creating major changes in the way that people travel in and around urban centres.

                                                       

                                                      Such changes, through a partnership of city authorities working with public transportation specialists, have allowed for all transport modes - including the private car - to come together to create genuinely integrated transportation networks.

                                                       

                                                      Policies which allow for the creation and funding of such networks now give far greater mobility, providing access to employment, healthcare and leisure facilities, and thereby increase the quality of life for citizens, whilst simultaneously starting to tackle environmental challenges in a sustainable way.

                                                       

                                                      In the city of Nantes, for example, Transdev has worked with the city authorities to develop an integrated transportation network which includes buses, tramways, bicycles, river shuttles and car-sharing.

                                                       

                                                      Similarly, in the city of Grenoble, and integrated network of trams and dedicated-highway bus routes provided by Transdev in partnership with the city has given rise to a 60% rise in public transit patronage over the past decade, in an environment where car ownership continues to increase.

                                                       

                                                      It is clear that the delivery of high-quality public transportation infrastructure has a direct and lasting impact on the economic and social development of society, and the adoption of a global mobility policy by the United States could deliver improvements nationally and internationally - quickly and effectively.

                                                       

                                                       

                                                      Corinne Block-Raguin, corinne.block-raguin@...

                                                      TRANSDEV

                                                      Issy-les-Moulineaux Paris

                                                       

                                                       

                                                       

                                                    • Richard Layman
                                                      The issue then is to focus on mobility and networks of mobility, rather than to orient planning only around specific modes.  Below is something I wrote
                                                      Message 26 of 29 , Jan 30, 2009
                                                        The issue then is to focus on mobility and networks of mobility, rather than to orient planning only around specific modes.  Below is something I wrote yesterday in my blog.  In the U.S., our metropolitan planning organizations (created to oversee US DOT monies) don't really do regional planning.  This is definitely an issue if the region crosses juridictional boundaries.  In the US, cities are relatively weak jurisdictions, mostly reliant on property and sales taxes for revenue, and are subsidiary to states.
                                                         
                                                        The kinds of initiatives that are happening in France, creating new light rail systems all over the country, how is that being enabled?  Certainly it's not just because some of the cities are hiring Transdev?  Or is it?
                                                         
                                                        Richard Layman
                                                        DC
                                                         

                                                        Second iteration, idealized national network for high speed railpassenger service

                                                        Second iteration, idealized national network for high speed rail passenger service
                                                        This map is updated some, and includes a link from Chicago across Illinois to Des Moines, Iowa, and then to Omaha, Nebraska.

                                                        Based on comments from the previous blog entry. It's not perfect, but it attempts to incorporate all the good comments but based on my drawing. Now, not just for pork barrell reasons, it provides service to almost every state.

                                                        The blue states are members of the States for Passenger Rail Coalition, the gray states are not members but have other high speed rail plans. The base graphic comes from S4PRC but in this version, I took off specific mention of that organization because they have no connection to this mapping exercise.
                                                        -----
                                                        Speaking of exercise, this is based on thinking about transportation networks in five overarching dimensions:
                                                         
                                                        1. International -- connections between countries. (The map above shows a couple connections between the U.S. and Canada, and one connection from San Antonio to Monterrey, Mexico through Laredo.)

                                                        2. National -- anchors of a national transportation system, current anchors are the Interstate Highway system, the freight railroad system, and airplane travel. We do not have a national passenger railroad network presently.

                                                        3. Regional -- multi-state connections -- for the most part these don't exist for transit, but do for freight railroad, airplane travel, and the Interstate highway system. The Northeast Corridor railroad passenger service offered by Amtrak is an example of such a transit network.

                                                        4. Metropolitan -- transit systems like the WMATA subway and bus system, the combined railroad, subway, bus, and waterborne transit services in the NYC or Boston regions.

                                                        5. Sub-metropolitan transit systems (in the DC region, locally provided services such as RideOn in Montgomery County Maryland or the Downtown Circulator in DC are examples of services within the subnetwork category of the Metropolitan Transit Network). 



                                                        --- On Fri, 1/30/09, Message from France <> wrote:
                                                        From: Message from France <>
                                                        Subject: [NewMobilityCafe] What lessons can America learn from the rest of the world . . .?
                                                        To: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com
                                                        Date: Friday, January 30, 2009, 10:16 AM

                                                        Message from France:

                                                         

                                                        The route to a global mobility policy

                                                         

                                                        Over the past decade, France has been one of the leading forces in the development of public transportation initiatives, creating major changes in the way that people travel in and around urban centres.

                                                         

                                                        Such changes, through a partnership of city authorities working with public transportation specialists, have allowed for all transport modes - including the private car - to come together to create genuinely integrated transportation networks.

                                                         

                                                        Policies which allow for the creation and funding of such networks now give far greater mobility, providing access to employment, healthcare and leisure facilities, and thereby increase the quality of life for citizens, whilst simultaneously starting to tackle environmental challenges in a sustainable way.

                                                         

                                                        In the city of Nantes, for example, Transdev has worked with the city authorities to develop an integrated transportation network which includes buses, tramways, bicycles, river shuttles and car-sharing.

                                                         

                                                        Similarly, in the city of Grenoble, and integrated network of trams and dedicated-highway bus routes provided by Transdev in partnership with the city has given rise to a 60% rise in public transit patronage over the past decade, in an environment where car ownership continues to increase.

                                                         

                                                        It is clear that the delivery of high-quality public transportation infrastructure has a direct and lasting impact on the economic and social development of society, and the adoption of a global mobility policy by the United States could deliver improvements nationally and internationally - quickly and effectively.

                                                         

                                                         

                                                        Corinne Block-Raguin, corinne.block- raguin@transdev. eu

                                                        TRANSDEV

                                                        Issy-les-Moulineaux Paris

                                                         

                                                         

                                                         

                                                      • Richard Layman
                                                        1.  What is it about France that leads local/regional jurisdictions to do broad-based mobility planning which integrates modes through the provision of
                                                        Message 27 of 29 , Jan 30, 2009
                                                          1.  What is it about France that leads local/regional jurisdictions to do broad-based mobility planning which integrates modes through the provision of connected metropolitan and submetropolitan (local) transit networks?*
                                                           
                                                          2.  Not having been to France, but aware of the high speed rail program, bicycle sharing programs that predate Velib, and the construction of new light rail systems around the county, such as in Bordeaux, I think it highly unlikely that these efforts were unleashed by enlightened transportation planning consulting firms and/or the salespeople from JC Decaux, Adshel, and Alstom.  Or am I wrong?
                                                           
                                                          Richard Layman
                                                          DC

                                                          * in my writing I discuss five levels of transportation networks
                                                           
                                                          - International -- connections between countries
                                                          - National -- transportation networks within countires, provided nationally (i.e., in the U.S. the national transportation network is comprised of the interstate highway system, the freight railroad system, and the airline travel system)
                                                          - Regional -- transportation networks connecting states, such as the Northeast Corridor Amtrak system or the transit systems connecting the NY city region across 3 to 4 states (NY, CT, NJ, PA),
                                                          - Metropolitan -- transit networks such as the WMATA bus and subway system in DC, two counties in Maryland, and three counties in Virginia.
                                                          - local -- submetropolitan networks such as county-based bus service in Montgomery County, Maryland, which centers most, but not all of its routes, around to and from service to subway systems and major business districts
                                                          --- On Fri, 1/30/09, Message from France <> wrote:
                                                          From: Message from France <>
                                                          Subject: [NewMobilityCafe] What lessons can America learn from the rest of the world . . .?
                                                          To: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com
                                                          Date: Friday, January 30, 2009, 10:16 AM

                                                          Message from France:

                                                           

                                                          The route to a global mobility policy

                                                           

                                                          Over the past decade, France has been one of the leading forces in the development of public transportation initiatives, creating major changes in the way that people travel in and around urban centres.

                                                           

                                                          Such changes, through a partnership of city authorities working with public transportation specialists, have allowed for all transport modes - including the private car - to come together to create genuinely integrated transportation networks.

                                                           

                                                          Policies which allow for the creation and funding of such networks now give far greater mobility, providing access to employment, healthcare and leisure facilities, and thereby increase the quality of life for citizens, whilst simultaneously starting to tackle environmental challenges in a sustainable way.

                                                           

                                                          In the city of Nantes, for example, Transdev has worked with the city authorities to develop an integrated transportation network which includes buses, tramways, bicycles, river shuttles and car-sharing.

                                                           

                                                          Similarly, in the city of Grenoble, and integrated network of trams and dedicated-highway bus routes provided by Transdev in partnership with the city has given rise to a 60% rise in public transit patronage over the past decade, in an environment where car ownership continues to increase.

                                                           

                                                          It is clear that the delivery of high-quality public transportation infrastructure has a direct and lasting impact on the economic and social development of society, and the adoption of a global mobility policy by the United States could deliver improvements nationally and internationally - quickly and effectively.

                                                           

                                                           

                                                          Corinne Block-Raguin, corinne.block- raguin@transdev. eu

                                                          TRANSDEV

                                                          Issy-les-Moulineaux Paris

                                                           

                                                           

                                                           

                                                        • Message from Sweden:
                                                          Message from Sweden: Dear Eric - here s a short text.. Basically I mean we are failing but where we have success, it is strong and replicable - it just needs
                                                          Message 28 of 29 , Jan 31, 2009

                                                            Message from Sweden:

                                                             

                                                            Dear Eric – here’s a short text.. Basically I mean we are failing but where we have success, it is strong and replicable – it just needs policymakers to stimulate creative environments and employ a full arsenal of flexible measures that promote non-motorised first, then support clean motorized when it is essential. And stop people flying, obviously!

                                                             

                                                            Combinations of measures promoting sustainable transport

                                                             

                                                            Since 1990, Sweden has failed to prevent spiraling growth of road transport and emissions. However, many interesting initiatives have taken place to stimulate multiple modes of transport and cleaner road transport. For example, around two thirds of passenger vehicles sold in Stockholm are now “clean vehicles” that run on alternative fuels or on fossil fuels but emit less than 120 gCO2/km. Nationally, Sweden has more E85 fuel stations than the entire USA. This has been achieved by use of incentives (exemption from congestion charge, tax rebates on vehicles and fuels, free parking) and regulation (carbon tax, municipalities obliged to procure clean vehicles, renewable fuel obligation), combined with extended provision of quality alternatives. The City of Stockholm is now working on a similar initiative for urban goods distribution trucks, in which various measures will be combined to achieve 10% clean trucks in city traffic by 2010.

                                                             

                                                            Preparing for a flexible transport system of the future is one of the central challenges of today’s transport planning. Less kilometers traveled, more efficient vehicles and a range of renewable fuels will be required if we are to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However – if travel is essential - the importance of driving more efficient vehicles with cleaner fuels cannot be understated. If the entire Swedish car fleet were to meet the EU’s target and reduce emissions to an average 120g/km by 2012, national emissions of greenhouse gases would decline by 8%. A total 5.2 million tCO2e can be avoided simply by meeting “Clean Vehicle” criteria. The Swedish case shows that through simple measures, market interest can be stimulated and the infrastructure for the provision of alternative fuels can be established. The approach taken could be used to stimulate demand for other alternative fuels or emerging technologies.

                                                             

                                                             

                                                            Paul Fenton, paul.fenton@...

                                                            WSP Analys & Strategi, www.wspgroup.se
                                                            Stockholm-Globen




                                                             

                                                          • eric britton
                                                            What lessons can America learn from the rest of the world in terms of transportation developments that are safe, efficient, cost-effective, and sustainable?
                                                            Message 29 of 29 , Feb 1, 2009

                                                              “What lessons can America learn from the rest of the world in terms of transportation developments that are safe, efficient, cost-effective, and sustainable?

                                                               

                                                              “We Americans often think of ourselves as sitting at the very top of the social, economic, technological, entertainment, and political pyramid.  After all, we invented human flight, the Super Bowl, the Interstate Highway , the transcontinental railroad, and Rock ‘n’ Roll.  But perhaps we’re not as advanced as we like to think.  Perhaps innovations in transportation , land use, and energy consumption are much more evenly distributed around the world than we ever thought possible.  Indeed, perhaps America is closer to the middle or bottom of the pyramid when it comes to transportation investments.  What lessons can America learn from the rest of the world in terms of transportation developments that are safe, efficient, cost-effective, and sustainable?”

                                                               

                                                              Here is that collection of interesting responses to my invitation of a week or so ago to provide very short brainstorming bits in response to the above famous question.  I share this with you with a couple thoughts in mind.  First by way of information, just in case some parts of this may be of interest to you.  Second, in case you have any suggestions about any of the entries you see their us far, including eventually URLs for reference for anyone who might wish to follow further on any of these ideas.

                                                               

                                                              And finally, might it be that you yourself might have a last-minute entry into this pantheon.  I think you have all of the necessary guidelines for this but if you can find them let me know and I will set them on immediately. It will take another week or so for me to whip this thing into final form for submittal to the editors, in part because I am hoping to pick up at least some additional messages on areas which I would like to have heard more about which are not yet cover her intercourse it is a huge universe of issues and approaches out there, but I would certainly have liked to have had a few more messages from France, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, and the long list goes on. 

                                                               

                                                              And anyone mention China? India? Japan? Africa. Sure Europe is leading in many respects but there is a big world out there. (Reminds me, you may want to play with www.knoogle.net to see if and how that might help feed your curiosity on any of this. That after all is what it is for.)

                                                               

                                                              It is just that there is so many interesting things happening here that the world, and our friends back in Washington, really do need to know more about.  Of course we cannot educate them (and ourselves) in a single piece like this, but maybe we will elicit some interest and drive some initiatives that otherwise might not have been there.  If that happens, this work would have been well worth it

                                                               

                                                              Can you imagine that we have none or next to no-discussion of issues as important as value capture, carsharing, road pricing, digital hitchhiking, free public transport, parking policy, public bikes, linking better civil society with formal government, Vision Zero and other ideas that make people sit up and think, concepts like the "street code" "Code de la rue"), and oh dear this list goes on and on.  And not a mention of media to get these good ideas across. But if we can capture a few more of these great ideas in the week ahead, I would be most pleased and I am sure that a number of you would as well.

                                                               

                                                              When I have all this in hand, including whatever feedback you would care to share with me, I will dump this to the National Journal who will then circulate our contributions to something like 12,000, 13,000 "Washington insiders" (kind of scary that).  We can hope that they will read it, profit from it, and use some of this to make a difference. We need it over there.

                                                               

                                                              All the best and with many thanks,

                                                               

                                                              Eric Britton

                                                               

                                                               

                                                               

                                                               

                                                               

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