Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Psychological and Perception Altering Traffic Calming Techniques

Expand Messages
  • Eric Britton
    Psychological and Perception Altering Traffic Calming Techniques I am writing to you to ask if you have any relevant information that may be of assistance to
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 1, 2008
    • 0 Attachment

       

      Psychological and Perception Altering Traffic Calming Techniques

       

      I am writing to you to ask if you have any relevant information that may

      be of assistance to Sheffield City Council.

       

      Sheffield has been using traditional traffic calming to address its

      accident issues for a number of years now. Schemes have been implemented

      both on minor residential roads and on residential distributor roads,

      which are often bus routes.

       

      The predominant method used has been speed cushions, normally laid in

      sets of two or three across the width of the road. Where buses are not

      present, road humps have been used.  Other features used such as

      signing, narrowed carriageways and pedestrian crossings, have also been

      successfully incorporated into schemes.

       

      However, the extensive use of vertical traffic calming is not popular

      with many people. A number of residential areas in Sheffield comprise

      small terraced housing built early in the 20th century. These properties

      have few off highway parking places. In order to ensure the correct

      vehicle alignment at cushion sets, parking restrictions are put in. This

      can have the effect of removing one third of on-street parking

      opportunity.

       

      Additionally, there are complaints that speed cushions damage car

      suspension and are painful for people with pre-existing back injuries.

      Noise is also cited as a problem at some locations where traffic

      contains a reasonable proportion of heavy goods vehicles.

       

      The City Council is keen to move away from these traditional methods,

      particularly, on low trafficked roads and would like to use other

      innovative methods that are based on altering driver behaviour through

      perception.

       

      I have found little internet based evidence of such techniques but I

      believe that other authorities and institutions have considered, and

      maybe, have used alternative forms of calming. I would be keen to learn

      of any work or research that you have carried out in this field.

       

      I would be grateful if you could spare some time to contact me. I

      appreciate that you are busy, but any information or guidance would be

      gratefully received.

       

      Yours faithfully

       

      Picture (Metafile)

       

      Simon Botterill

      Team Manager

      Traffic Management

      Transport and Highways Division

      tel 0114 273 6167

      fax 0114 273 6182

       

       

       

        The New Mobility Agenda – http://www.invent.newmobility.org

        Europe:   8/10 rue Joseph Bara,     75006 Paris,  France   

        T:  +331 4326 1323    Skype : ericbritton

       

        New Mobility Partnerships  - http://www.partners.newmobility.org

        USA:      9440 Readcrest Dr.   Los Angeles, CA  90210      

        T: +1 310 601-8468   Skype: newmobility

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • Kerry Wood
      Simon It is not exactly psychological but you might like to try sinusoidal speed humps. Position doesn t matter, buses can cope reasonably well and there is no
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 1, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Simon

        It is not exactly psychological but you might like to try sinusoidal speed humps. 

        Position doesn't matter, buses can cope reasonably well and there is no jarring so there should be no problems with vehicle damage or vehicle occupants with back problems.

        If speed is too high there is still no jarring - on takeoff!

        At a guess, one-off construction using a template would be good enough but concrete casting would be the way to go.

        k

        Kerry Wood


        On 1/12/2008, at 9:52 PM, Eric Britton wrote:

         
        Psychological and Perception Altering Traffic Calming Techniques
         
        I am writing to you to ask if you have any relevant information that may
        be of assistance to Sheffield City Council.
         
        Sheffield has been using traditional traffic calming to address its
        accident issues for a number of years now. Schemes have been implemented
        both on minor residential roads and on residential distributor roads,
        which are often bus routes.
         
        The predominant method used has been speed cushions, normally laid in
        sets of two or three across the width of the road. Where buses are not
        present, road humps have been used.  Other features used such as
        signing, narrowed carriageways and pedestrian crossings, have also been
        successfully incorporated into schemes.
         
        However, the extensive use of vertical traffic calming is not popular
        with many people. A number of residential areas in Sheffield comprise
        small terraced housing built early in the 20th century. These properties
        have few off highway parking places. In order to ensure the correct
        vehicle alignment at cushion sets, parking restrictions are put in. This
        can have the effect of removing one third of on-street parking
        opportunity.
         
        Additionally, there are complaints that speed cushions damage car
        suspension and are painful for people with pre-existing back injuries.
        Noise is also cited as a problem at some locations where traffic
        contains a reasonable proportion of heavy goods vehicles.
         
        The City Council is keen to move away from these traditional methods,
        particularly, on low trafficked roads and would like to use other
        innovative methods that are based on altering driver behaviour through
        perception.
         
        I have found little internet based evidence of such techniques but I
        believe that other authorities and institutions have considered, and
        maybe, have used alternative forms of calming. I would be keen to learn
        of any work or research that you have carried out in this field.
         
        I would be grateful if you could spare some time to contact me. I
        appreciate that you are busy, but any information or guidance would be
        gratefully received.
         
        Yours faithfully
         
        Picture (Metafile)
         
        Simon Botterill
        Team Manager
        Traffic Management
        Transport and Highways Division
        tel 0114 273 6167
        fax 0114 273 6182
         
         
         
          The New Mobility Agenda  http://www.invent.newmobility.org
          Europe:   8/10 rue Joseph Bara,     75006 Paris,  France   
          T:  +331 4326 1323    Skype : ericbritton
         
          New Mobility Partnerships  - http://www.partners.newmobility.org
          USA:      9440 Readcrest Dr.   Los Angeles, CA  90210      
          T: +1 310 601-8468   Skype: newmobility
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         

      • Richard Layman
        the issue is using road materials that slow the speeds down naturally.  You have the disconnect between what standard road pavements, combined with standard
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 2, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          the issue is using road materials that slow the speeds down naturally.  You have the disconnect between what standard road pavements, combined with standard engineered cars allows, to wit high speeds, regardless of context.
           
          I don't know about research unfortunately to prove my hypothesis, but what I recommend (as do others) is using different road pavements.  For example, stone Belgian Block provides physical, visual, and aural cues that lead drivers to drive significantly slower.
           
          It costs more, but lasts at least 100 years...
           
          Monument Avenue, Richmond, Virginia




          --- On Mon, 12/1/08, Kerry Wood <kerry.wood@...> wrote:
          From: Kerry Wood <kerry.wood@...>
          Subject: Re: [NewMobilityCafe] Psychological and Perception Altering Traffic Calming Techniques
          To: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, December 1, 2008, 5:36 PM

          Simon

          It is not exactly psychological but you might like to try sinusoidal speed humps. 

          Position doesn't matter, buses can cope reasonably well and there is no jarring so there should be no problems with vehicle damage or vehicle occupants with back problems.

          If speed is too high there is still no jarring - on takeoff!

          At a guess, one-off construction using a template would be good enough but concrete casting would be the way to go.

          k

          Kerry Wood


          On 1/12/2008, at 9:52 PM, Eric Britton wrote:

           
          Psychological and Perception Altering Traffic Calming Techniques
           
          I am writing to you to ask if you have any relevant information that may
          be of assistance to Sheffield City Council.
           
          Sheffield has been using traditional traffic calming to address its
          accident issues for a number of years now. Schemes have been implemented
          both on minor residential roads and on residential distributor roads,
          which are often bus routes.
           
          The predominant method used has been speed cushions, normally laid in
          sets of two or three across the width of the road. Where buses are not
          present, road humps have been used.  Other features used such as
          signing, narrowed carriageways and pedestrian crossings, have also been
          successfully incorporated into schemes.
           
          However, the extensive use of vertical traffic calming is not popular
          with many people. A number of residential areas in Sheffield comprise
          small terraced housing built early in the 20th century. These properties
          have few off highway parking places. In order to ensure the correct
          vehicle alignment at cushion sets, parking restrictions are put in. This
          can have the effect of removing one third of on-street parking
          opportunity.
           
          Additionally, there are complaints that speed cushions damage car
          suspension and are painful for people with pre-existing back injuries.
          Noise is also cited as a problem at some locations where traffic
          contains a reasonable proportion of heavy goods vehicles.
           
          The City Council is keen to move away from these traditional methods,
          particularly, on low trafficked roads and would like to use other
          innovative methods that are based on altering driver behaviour through
          perception.
           
          I have found little internet based evidence of such techniques but I
          believe that other authorities and institutions have considered, and
          maybe, have used alternative forms of calming. I would be keen to learn
          of any work or research that you have carried out in this field.
           
          I would be grateful if you could spare some time to contact me. I
          appreciate that you are busy, but any information or guidance would be
          gratefully received.
           
          Yours faithfully
           
          Picture (Metafile)
           
          Simon Botterill
          Team Manager
          Traffic Management
          Transport and Highways Division
          tel 0114 273 6167
          fax 0114 273 6182
           
           
           
            The New Mobility Agenda  http://www.invent. newmobility. org
            Europe:   8/10 rue Joseph Bara,     75006 Paris,  France   
            T:  +331 4326 1323    Skype : ericbritton
           
            New Mobility Partnerships  - http://www.partners .newmobility. org
            USA:      9440 Readcrest Dr.   Los Angeles, CA  90210      
            T: +1 310 601-8468   Skype: newmobility
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           

        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.