Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Hans Monderman messages

Expand Messages
  • eric.britton
    Dear Terence, Ben and others. In fact what we call shared space is probably the most common arrangement taking in the world as a whole. Highly regulated
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 14, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Re: Hans - Newsnight BBC 2 Monday 15th January

      Dear Terence, Ben and others.

      In fact what we call shared space is probably the most common arrangement taking in the world as a whole. Highly regulated traffic systems with strong separation of modes and types of traffic is mostly found in developed western countries, and other countries where western consultants and engineers have left their mark.

      How well shared space works depends on many things, but one factor that strikes me as important is speed of vehicles, and the differences in speed of different vehicles. For example where there is a big mix of cyclists and slow-moving motor vehicles, it works well. Where motor vehicles predominate and there are few pedestrians it is more difficult to get drivers to go slowly, and then the system breaks down.

      Another aspect is attitudes and behaviour of the population concerned. Hans Monderman recognised the difference in behaviour of a local village resident in a vehicle, and a driver from elsewhere (perhaps even from another country) passing through and being unaware of local driving norms. In busy streets in China one can spot the western foreigners because they try to dodge the vehicles when crossing the road, whereas the norm is to walk slowly but deliberately across the road, and let the drivers dodge you.

      I have many other thoughts on this, but they will have to await my next book (well, article anyway).

      Terence, I would like to hear more about Vietnam when we next meet.

      Best regards to all

      Tim Pharoah


      On 14/1/08 09:44, "Terence Bendixson" <t.bendixson@...> wrote:

      Dear Ben
       
      Thanks for your report. I have been in Vietnam and had missed the news. Oddly enough I was thinking about Monderman and you when there. As I expect you know, traffic in places like Hanoi flows almost without benefit of traffic engineering and control - and  virtually never gets blocked. It is a tribute to human interaction, decentralisation and the smallness of most of the vehicles. It is not pretty but it works. Have you witnessed it?
       
      Regards
       
      Terence Bendixson
      Secretary
      ITC
       

       

       

    • Stefan Langeveld
      ... that strikes me as important is speed of vehicles, and the differences in speed of different vehicles. For example where there is a big mix of cyclists and
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 17, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Comment on Tim Pharoah:

        > How well shared space works depends on many things, but one factor
        that strikes me as important is speed of vehicles, and the differences
        in speed of different vehicles. For example where there is a big mix
        of cyclists and slow-moving motor vehicles, it works well. Where motor
        vehicles predominate and there are few pedestrians it is more
        difficult to get drivers to go slowly, and then the system breaks down. <

        That's the present situation. Cars rule and pedestrians stay clear.
        When the street is redesigned (place cycle parking, seating, plants
        etc in the centre, for instance) people will cross 'everywhere' and
        drivers *will* slow down. No difficulty there.


        > Another aspect is attitudes and behaviour of the population
        concerned. Hans
        > Monderman recognised the difference in behaviour of a local village
        resident
        > in a vehicle, and a driver from elsewhere (perhaps even from another
        > country) passing through and being unaware of local driving norms.
        In busy
        > streets in China one can spot the western foreigners because they try to
        > dodge the vehicles when crossing the road, whereas the norm is to walk
        > slowly but deliberately across the road, and let the drivers dodge you.

        I think some norms are universal, like Drivers will dodge walkers.
        But in the West 'those responsible' have managed to put drivers/cars
        at the top, so that walkers feel and act scared. And need to be
        protected by 'those responsible'.

        Stefan Langeveld
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.