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Re: [NewMobilityCafe] BRT - Q&As

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  • Carlosfelipe Pardo
    I agree. But the throughput issue will also have people think it s crowded, I won t use it . I did a short video in this regard, which some people have liked.
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 30, 2007
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      I agree. But the throughput issue will also have people think "it's crowded, I won't use it".

      I did a short video in this regard, which some people have liked. It's in youtube under "Efficiency of public and private transport" (somehow, giving the link will make this email bounce as spam).

      Best regards,
      Carlosfelipe Pardo
      Coordinador de Proyecto- Project Coordinator
      GTZ - Proyecto de Transporte Sostenible (SUTP, SUTP-LAC)
      Cl 93A # 14-17 of 708
      Bogotá D.C., Colombia
      Tel/fax:  +57 (1) 236 2309  Mobile: +57 (3) 15 296 0662
      carlos.pardo@...   www.sutp.org 


      Richard Layman wrote:
      I think it's important to have constant public communications campaigns about the "efficiency" and throughput issues.  Billboards, etc.
       
      This is the latest version of this type of graphic (first done in Tampa, later in Charlottesville, and certainly in other places) from Munster, Germany--how much space and how many vehicles are required to move the same number of people by mode.

       
      This is an old GE ad from the 1940s.
       
      And some systems like in Los Angeles, have done billboards.. .
       

      The throughput issue, that at best one lane mile can move 2,000 vehicles, and that with regular bus 6,750 people, and with BRT, at least 10,000 (and more with light rail or subway), has to be constantly reinforced.
       
      Somehow this kind of efficiency needs to be seen as a green/environmental issue.
       
      Richard Layman
      DC

      carlosfpardo@ gmail.com wrote:
      Regarding the issue on exclusive bus lanes being overtaken by cars:
      ·         - in Bogotá, informal public transport operators have once or twice
      tried to gain the use of exclusive lanes for BRT, with no luck
      (fortunately, until now)
      ·         - in Quito, traffic police have decided that, in some sectors of the
      city, it would be best to let cars go into the exclusive BRT lanes, to
      "relieve congestion". We have done our best to reestablish the priority
      of BRT buses and to explain traffic police why it should be that way,
      without 100% effectiveness to date.
      ·         - now in Jakarta, a similar temporary measure is being implemented,
      during construction.

      I am sometimes frightened by this situation. In the case of Bogotá,
      there is an appropriate legal environment that makes it impossible for
      all vehicles except BRT vehicles to use the exclusive lane. However, the
      fact that lanes can be taken by other vehicles is one of the fragile
      elements of BRT, especially due to the fact that many car drivers see
      the exclusive lane as a waste of space (and thus, ask for a metro).
      Explaining to everyone the efficiency of use of space and the need to
      give priority to public transport is very difficult.

      The reaction to ask for more roads for private transport is literally
      what a 5-year old would do, from a developmental psychology point of
      view (Piaget's experiments on permanence, etc): in short-term thinking,
      it seems only logical that the "empty space" should be filled with other
      cars to improve traffic flow. What is really an improved efficiency of
      space (e.g. no traffic jam on the exclusive lane due to a properly
      planned public transport system) is seen as a "waste of space" and the
      typical solution is requested: more space for cars. The immediate
      consequence (e.g. cars anyway clogged in traffic) proves that the
      solution was anyway wrong, but the 20-second time span when cars were
      moving to the empty lane seemed rewarding enough to make them do it
      again, and again, and again.

      Strange. And this, unfortunately, has consequences on political
      decisions (e.g. "we need a subway or light rail because there just isn't
      any space for buses").

      A conclusion could be: traffic police (and many car users) need more
      exercise on abstract reasoning. What to do? Comments are most welcome.

      Best regards,

      Carlosfelipe Pardo
      Coordinador de Proyecto- Project Coordinator
      GTZ - Proyecto de Transporte Sostenible (SUTP, SUTP-LAC)
      Cl 93A # 14-17 of 708
      Bogotá D.C., Colombia
      Tel/fax: +57 (1) 236 2309 Mobile: +57 (3) 15 296 0662



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