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Re: This morning 351 small French children walked to school here in Paris.

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  • Carlos F. Pardo SUTP
    Eric, It s great that you ve started with children, and that you focus this on the broader goal of reducing emissions, etc (as abstract as it may seem, but a
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 27, 2007
      Eric,

      It's great that you've started with children, and that you focus this on the broader goal of reducing emissions, etc (as abstract as it may seem, but a goal in the end). I guess they understood this is just the beginning of their "new mobility", not that this is just "for the kids and their parents" until they grow up and get the driver's license. Pictures of this are more than welcome to see how it all looked!

      Best regards,


      Carlos F. Pardo
      Coordinador de Proyecto- Project Coordinator
      GTZ - Proyecto de Transporte Sostenible (SUTP, SUTP-LAC)
      Cl 93A # 14-17 of 708
      Bogotá D.C., Colombia
      Tel/fax:  +57 (1) 236 2309  Mobile: +57 (3) 15 296 0662
      carlos.pardo@...   www.sutp.org 


      Eric Britton wrote:

      (Let’s see now, if one cm of a new metro cost between $400 and $1000.00, what about this for New Mobility cost/CO2 effectiveness.)

       

      This morning 351 small French children walked to one school here in Paris. It’s not a big deal of course, but just possibly a story worth sharing with you.

       

      A young teacher at a school in the seventh arrondissement in Paris, Louise Assad, together with her colleagues, have been working to increase the children’s environmental awareness, including of their own role in both the problems and solutions of our present planetary dilemma. One of the main sources of their inspiration ha been the “Earth Challenge” (Defi pour la terre) program of France’s most popular and esteemed action ecologists, Nicolas Hulot. You can see all about his program at http://www.defipour laterre.org/.)

       

      As part of a build-up to their first “Walk to School Day” (scheduled for this morning) Louise invited me to pop over to the school last Friday and talk with the kids about what all this might mean in the greater scheme of things. Great idea.

       

      So I prepared the attached informal outline to guide a lively a 30-40 minute session to meet in two sections, one for the 8-10 group and the second for the big guys (11-12). We then met in our two groups and sat down on the floor of their little gym, and ran through the several points that you will see outlined in the following that I developed to guide our time together. We more or less followed this outline and it worked out to be a pretty active session with lots of participation and excitement, and, as the saying goes, we all had a great time.

       

      Then this morning was their first Walk to School, in which the children gathered at half a dozen appointed rendezvous points each about a ten minute walk and proceeded  to make their way to school together, talking all the way. You know how that works.

       

      Louise Assad put it like this: “The children, teachers and parents all commented on how much they all enjoyed the experience of just be

      (Message over 64 KB, truncated)

    • Chris Bradshaw [mailto:c_bradshaw@rogers
      From: Chris Bradshaw [mailto:c_bradshaw@rogers.com] Eric, At the time this was taking place, I was leading a group of (fellow) seniors through a Smart
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 2, 2007

        From: Chris Bradshaw [mailto:c_bradshaw@...]
         

        Eric,

         

        At the time this was taking place, I was leading a group of (fellow) seniors through a "Smart Transportation" workshop.  Of course, walking as the top mode.

         

        Walking, of course, is the top mode for both the young and the old.

         

        Since you mention "footprint,: I will offer the phrase, "Using Our Feet To Reduce Our Footprint(s)" to your campaign, which I used for my article in _Local Environment_ journal (1997)

         

        I am more in favour of SRTS (Safe routes to school) than the Walking School Bus, since the latter requires them to walk in a large group, reducing the autonomy and increasing danger (of each kid assuming the one just _ahead_ checked for traffic).

         

        Kids should be asserting their "right to walk."  Between the drivers who cause the danger and their parents who overreact to the threats of traffic (and especially 'strangers'), and the rest of us who don't walk -- or, if inside, watch the streets -- much any more, kids' joyous system of movement has been gravely curtailed.  And in place of the wonderful world of street life, their mouths are forced up to the 'nipple' of TV and video games, to keep them safe and 'occupied.'

         

        Encourage kids to draw pictures, write poems, or take pictures of both what they want, and what is wrong with the current situation. 

         

        Remember, there is more to walking than getting to school.

         

        Chris Bradshaw

        Ottawa

         

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