Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Histories and Ideas Behind Bogota's BRT

Expand Messages
  • On Behalf Of Eric Bruun
    On Behalf Of Eric Bruun Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 1:33 AM Also, don t forget that the avialable rights-of-way and existing infrastructure have a lot to
    Message 1 of 28 , Jan 31, 2007
    • 0 Attachment

      On Behalf Of Eric Bruun
      Sent:
      Thursday, February 01, 2007 1:33 AM
       

      Also, don't forget that the avialable rights-of-way and existing infrastructure have a lot to do with

      how attractive various options might be. Cities never start with a clean slate.

       

      Eric Bruun

    • ann_hackett
      Can New Mobility achieve Lots Less Cars by simulating CarFree Days using the following 3 R s to reach a catagory 5? Reduce parking Replace
      Message 2 of 28 , Feb 4, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Can New Mobility achieve Lots Less Cars by simulating CarFree Days
        using the following 3 R's to reach a catagory 5?

        Reduce parking
        Replace xTransit
        Reallocate Cycle networks

        Ann

        --- In NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com, Rory McMullan <roryer@...> wrote:
        >
        > It also suffers from not having a cycle network of any note, meaning
        its still too dangerous to cycle for young kids or beginners. Without
        this basic infrastruture I would never be able to think of London as
        anything but an 'Old Mobility City'
        >
        > What London does have is Ken, a politician with the guts to build a
        real cycle network which could find room by taking space from the over
        accomodated motorised traffic.
        >
        > I wish Ken would stand for parliament and become the Secretary of
        State for Transport, then the whole of the UK might have a chance to
        catch up with London.
        >
        > Ian Wingrove <ian.wingrove@...> wrote:

        >
        > The criteria are getting tougher and more detailed - which is
        good. London suffers from being congested and very centralised, with
        a huge hinterland of the south east of England.
        >
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Andrew Curry
        > Sent: 29 January 2007 19:32
        > To: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: Re: [NewMobilityCafe] Old Mobility rules - 5 kinds of cities
        >
        >
        > Perhaps I'm not understanding some of the finer points of
        this, but I'm not sure why even central London would earn the '5'
        rating.
        >
        > There's still too many vehicles, generally travelling too fast on
        most roads to ensure any kind of community cohesion for people who
        live in the centre's residential areas. There is little effective
        regulation of vehicle behaviour through design or sanctions. There
        are few homezone type areas. It's still not a safe place generally
        for cyclists, nor for walkers (again partly because traffic speeds
        remain high except through limits imposed through congestion).
        >
        > I'd expect a city which was a '5' to meet all of the above
        descriptions. When London (this is only an example) reduces the
        Victoria Embankment to two lanes for powered vehicles, and passes
        the other side of the road over to cyclists and walkers, I think it
        might then be a sign that it is starting to move from 4 to 5.
        >
        > Until then it would be good to see a little less self-congratulation.
        >
        > Andrew
        >
        >
        > On 26/01/07, Ian Wingrove < ian.wingrove@...> wrote:

        > Eric
        >
        > Those are good ground rules, but a bit more rigorous than
        the paragraph you originally put round and I think I would go
        with the Simon Norton view that central and Inner London might
        hit catagory 5, but outer London (where the vaste majority of
        Londoners live) is down at 3 or 4.
        >
        > The recent Transport for London strategy document on 2025,
        which will act as the basis of their bid for money from
        Government etc... has the following analysis and targets. With
        rising population they are expecting 4 million extra journeys by
        2025. They aim to have 5 million journeys supported by public
        transport, walking and cycling. The result being that public
        transport modal share will increase from 37% to 41%, walking will rise
        slightly to 22% and cycling will have a 400% increase from a very
        low base to reach 5% of journeys. The bottom line is that car
        journeys will drop from 41% of modal share to 32%, or in real
        terms from 11m to 10m.
        >
        > The Climate Change Action Plan has the aim of reducing CO2
        from all forms of transport in London by 25% by 2020 . This will
        be acheived despite a 50% growth in energy used by the tube
        system due to line upgrades. It is ambitious, but their policy
        unit have spent a year doing the figures and working out the most
        cost effective approaches. The plan will be formally launched in
        the next month.
        >
        > Most of the traffic reduction will come from the
        reallocation of road space over time - redesign of public spaces,
        new cycle/bus lanes and road pricing.
        >
        > The barriers to this are many and varied, but more work
        needs to be done on planning - although the density of housing
        has increased several fold, we need far more restictive parking
        standards. Also, the fares in London have been hiked up in order
        to help pay for all the new infrastructure.
        >
        > Cheers
        >
        > IW
        >
        >
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com [mailto:NewMobility
        Cafe@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eric Britton (ChoiceMail)
        > Sent: 25 January 2007 14:49
        > To: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [NewMobilityCafe] Old Mobility rules - 5 kinds of
        cities
        >
        >
        >
        > I am delighted to hear Ian that London is a
        strong Category 5 candidate? I recall when I was lending a hand
        in the Contested Streets film out of New York last summer, that they
        were looking very favorably on your fair city as a possible
        example.
        >
        > But just to be quite sure on the ground rules in all
        this.
        >
        > Category 5:
        >
        > Verifiable progress for the full defined city area (we
        need to be very clear on this) in terms of:
        >
        >
        > 1. An explicit announced and strongly defended and
        supported city policy to this effect.
        >
        >
        > 2. Global decreases in overall vehicle traffic (not
        just here and there). I.e., for the city area as a whole
        >
        >
        > 3. Corresponding area-wide CO2 decreases (though to
        measure but there are ways)
        >
        >
        > 4. Significant shifts from single occupancy (or
        thereabouts) car trips anywhere in the city area.
        >
        >
        > 5. Significant tightening of road space available for
        moving and stationary cars
        >
        >
        > 6. No quality sacrifices in "mobility for all" in terms
        of trip availability, cost and convenience for
        >
        >
        > It may be that the first three on this list are all we
        need to do this job, but let me post this as a challenge draft
        and see what we can do with it.
        >
        > I am eager to hear what others who know your city well
        have to say. I think this could prove a lively and creative
        exercise.
        >
        > Eric Britton
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > GREATERLOND ONAUTHORITY
        > EMAIL NOTICE:
        > The information in this email may contain confidential or
        privileged materials. Please read the full email notice at
        http://www.london.gov.uk/email-notice.jsp
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > email from Andrew Curry
        >
        >
        > GREATERLONDONAUTHORITY
        > EMAIL NOTICE:
        > The information in this email may contain confidential or
        privileged materials. Please read the full email notice at
        http://www.london.gov.uk/email-notice.jsp
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > What kind of emailer are you? Find out today - get a free analysis
        of your email personality. Take the quiz at the Yahoo! Mail Championship.
        >
      • XavierTreviño
        Thinking about the 5-category cities excercise proposed by Eric, in the case of Mexico City, which is what I know best, there are different perceptions of the
        Message 3 of 28 , Feb 9, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Thinking about the 5-category cities excercise
          proposed by Eric, in the case of Mexico City, which is
          what I know best, there are different perceptions of
          the traffic and emmissions danger, in the Federal
          District, in the center area of the City (almost 9
          million people), and the outer Mexico City (another 9
          miillon in 15-20 different municipalities. In the
          central city since the 90s the goverment have been
          implementing isolated policies to control the carbon
          emmisions, including in 2006 the metrobus BRT project,
          that bring the área to Category 3.

          But the outer City is clearly Category 2 or even 1;
          they clearly worry, but the results of this are more
          roads, more bridges and more sprawl.

          X.

          --- eric.britton@... wrote:
          > I would like to propose to you a thinking exercise.
          > It works like this.



          ____________________________________________________________________________________
          TV dinner still cooling?
          Check out "Tonight's Picks" on Yahoo! TV.
          http://tv.yahoo.com/
        • Chris Bradshaw
          Eric, This EU process on a review of urban transportation is worthy of us following it and at the appropriate moment, submitting a comprehensive set of
          Message 4 of 28 , Feb 9, 2007
          • 0 Attachment

            Eric,

            This EU process on a review of urban transportation is worthy of us
            following it and at the appropriate moment, submitting a comprehensive set
            of comments, that clearly sets out what "new mobility" can offer.

            Please post future key events in the process.

            I would like to try my hand at a paper from the carsharing 'industry.'

            Chris Bradshaw
            Ottawa

          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.