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US article - "Cities in region want to make mean streets safe for pedestrians"

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  • ecoplan.adsl
    We have been speaking with John Whitelegg about doing a special issue of the Journal of World Transport Policy and Practice on the topic of The Pedestrian
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 29, 2000
      We have been speaking with John Whitelegg about doing a special issue of the
      Journal of World Transport Policy and Practice on the topic of The
      Pedestrian Friendly City, and so when the following reference came through
      the Net I immediately had a look and pass if along for your information.

      In the meantime, I would also like to invite you to have a look at our
      almost completed major rehab of the World Transport Web site at
      http://www.ecoplan.org/wtpp -- and if you have any thoughts for us on the
      Pedestrian Friendly issue, or more generally on either articles or themes
      for future issues, this is the place to turn.

      Regards,


      = = = = =
      Eric Britton

      ecopl@n ___ technology, economy, society ___
      Le Frene, 8/10 rue Joseph Bara, 75006 Paris, France
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      =====
      Cities in region want to make mean streets safe for pedestrians
      By Gordon Smith
      COPLEY NEWS SERVICE
      August 28, 2000

      http://www.uniontribune.com/news/state/20000828-0010_1n28peds.html



      ""But throughout the Los Angeles area, officials are taking sides like never
      before with the neglected peons of the traffic world: pedestrians.
      In Santa Monica, engineers are installing "smart" crosswalks and other
      improvements designed to make it easier and safer to cross streets on foot.
      In Santa Ana, a task force is focusing on safety education in neighborhoods
      whose Latino residents are especially vulnerable to pedestrian accidents.
      Meanwhile, Glendale, Redondo Beach and other cities in the region are
      increasingly using "stings" involving pedestrian decoys to nab speeding
      drivers. Sometimes, cops also zero in on pedestrians who dart into streets
      or jaywalk far from crosswalks.
      In these cities and many others, officials are buzzing over the "three E's"
      that they believe will improve life for people on foot: engineering,
      education and enforcement.
      If Los Angeles -- the nation's car capital -- can turn itself into a
      pedestrian-friendly metropolis, some experts say, other cities around
      Southern California and the West will follow suit.
      But the efforts, though numerous, are scattered and poorly coordinated. They
      also point up the difficulty and expense of trying to retrofit an urban
      landscape for pedestrians when cars have been king for decades. ..."

      Article continues...
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