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Re: [NewEnglandCampaigners] Riverton

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  • SUNNYNOOK4@aol.com
    Thanks for the invite, but we re concentrating and committing ourselves to the drill on the 30th. Hope you have a great turnout! YOS, Scott Sleeper 1stSgt,
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 1, 2005
      Thanks for the invite, but we're concentrating and committing ourselves to the drill on the 30th.  Hope you have a great turnout! 

      YOS,

      Scott Sleeper
      1stSgt, 6thNHVI
    • Todd M. Bryda
      For those attending, Mark DeAngelis has put together a great living history scenario for us: Hello all: To help set the tone for Riverton, here is a little
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 6, 2005
        For those attending, Mark DeAngelis has put together a great living
        history scenario for us:

        "Hello all:

        To help set the tone for Riverton, here is a little background info
        setting up the historical scenario for us to portray at Riverton.
        This is a Camp of Instruction in both 21st century and 19th century
        terms. It's a chance to get acquainted or reacquainted with each
        other, with our equipment, with drill and more drill and with how
        cold it can get at night in April in Connecticut.

        I look forward to seeing you all there.

        Late in 1863, both the Federal Govt. and the Commonwealth of
        Massachusetts offered substantial bounties and 30 day furloughs for
        veterans who re-enlisted. Some 157 of the grizzled veterans of the
        28th Mass re-enlisted at that time. Furloughs were extended during
        the winter of '63-'64.

        In Feb. of 1864, Colonel Richard Byrnes and four officers returned
        to Massachusetts to recruit for the regiment whose numbers had been
        reduced to approx. 200 men. The recruiting proceeded splendidly,
        with nearly 300 new recruits joining the rolls. In March, Col.
        Byrnes was presented with a new green flag at the Parker House in
        Boston. He made the following remarks:

        "I can promise you no more, than to assure you that (this flag) will
        be a fresh incentive to the brave men who are periling their lives
        in defense of that flag which typifies Union and liberty, and
        beneath which the shamrock has ever bloomed. In a few days, this
        flag will throw its emerald folds to the breeze, and the smoke of
        battle will encircle it; its freshness and beauty may be tarnished,
        but while there is an Irish arm to strike in its defense, its honor
        shall never, never be sullied or impaired. I can only point to the
        past history of my regiment to vouch for the future. Neither
        Massachusetts nor the historic fame of our race need blush for such
        a regiment."

        Col. Byrnes did not rejoin the regiment until May 20. In the
        meantime, the regiment had been heavily engaged in the Wilderness
        and Spotsylvania. Since the records indicate that the regiment's
        strength exceeded 300 in those battles, the recruits must have
        returned to the regiment earlier than Byrnes did.

        The scenario that we would like to depict for Riverton is a small
        mixed detail of the 28th Mass made up of new recruits preparing to
        head toward the seat of war for the first time and veterans who are
        returning from furlough. The detail is gathering at training camp
        under the direction of Captain Bryda. The time is late March of
        1864 and the place is a generic, unspecified rural town to the West
        of Boston. Since we are in training camp we have the luxury of wedge
        tents, camp furniture, commissary gear and other amenities as
        provided by the generous local citizens. While we are engaged in
        the important military tasks that require our attention during the
        day, we are also able to let off a little steam on the eve of our
        impending departure to the South. There is likely to be music,
        light spirits, and a festive air in the evening. We even have a
        brand new green flag!

        The setting is likely to provide for a "semi-immersion" event, with
        many opportunities for first person interaction within the ranks,
        with the period civilians and with the modern spectators. Use of
        first person is strongly encouraged. This is a "campaign attitude"
        event even though the historical scenario calls for a garrison camp.

        Enjoy lads!

        Mark DeAngelis
        28th Mass, Co. K"

        As you can see, he put some thought into it. As it is a living
        history/school of the soldier, there is no fee to attend other than a
        commissary fee of 8.00 which will cover coffee in the morning and
        dinner Saturday night. To encourage the growth of impressions,
        everyone is providing their own breakfast and lunch.

        Even if you can't attend, please chime in with your thoughts.

        Thanks!
        Todd
      • Todd M. Bryda
        This is a copy of the post Jack Gale placed on the Co. K forum. (BTW Jack is our organization s president.) Company K, 28th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 12, 2005
          This is a copy of the post Jack Gale placed on the Co. K forum. (BTW
          Jack is our organization's president.)


          "Company K, 28th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry
          School of the Soldier - PAID EVENT

          Fairgrounds on RT 20 in Riverton, CT
          Friday, 22 April @ 6PM to Sunday, 24 April @ 3PM
          (Saturday muster at 8AM)

          Roster: All present and prospective members of Company K and
          guests
          from the New England Campaigner Company (NECC)

          Goals: Work out the rust, work on our first person (1P)
          impressions,
          train new recruits and work with NECC. We will have to relearn
          left
          from right (with Tim missing, we may be the only unit that can
          march
          to the left, but can't go to RIGHT flank!) As always, we're
          there to
          have fun and we get to raise some money for the unit.

          Gear: While we are stressing campaigning this season, the
          scenario
          (see below) calls for a base camp. We will all find a wedge tent
          and
          an extra blanket/great coat better suited to late April.
          Mark's "campaigner attitude in a base camp setting" seems to sum
          it
          up. Bring campaign food/cartridges & caps/sacks or rolls/bottled
          water/cold weather gear. Commissary will provide AM coffee and
          Saturday supper for about $8.

          Directions:

          From the East: Take Route 84W through Hartford to the Rt 4
          Farmington exit. Take Rt 4 W to Rt 179 to Collinsville and
          follow Rt
          179 to its junction with Rt 44. Take Rt 44 West through New
          Hartford
          center go about 3 miles and take the next right following the
          signs
          to Pleasant Valley. Go straight through the intersection (an
          iron
          bridge will be on the right) and go approximately 5 miles to
          Riverton. Take a right onto Rt 20 the fair grounds are .2 miles
          on the right.

          From the North: Take Rt 91 South to Rt 84 West and follow the
          directions above.

          From the South: Take Rt 202 to Torrington and then take Rt 8
          North to
          Winsted. Take a right at the intersection onto Rt 44W and go
          about .75 miles and take a right at the Northwestern Connecticut
          Community College and take Rt 8 north. Go 5 miles and take a
          right
          onto Rt 20 towards Riverton. Go about 4 miles into Riverton, the
          fairgrounds will be on the right.

          Scenario:

          Mark DeAngelis has put together a great living history scenario:

          To help set the tone for Riverton, here is a little background
          info
          setting up the historical scenario for us to portray at
          Riverton.
          This is a Camp of Instruction in both 21st century and 19th
          century
          terms. It's a chance to get acquainted or reacquainted with each
          other, with our equipment, with drill and more drill and with
          how
          cold it can get at night in April in Connecticut. I look forward
          to
          seeing you all there.

          Late in 1863, both the Federal Govt. and the Commonwealth of
          Massachusetts offered substantial bounties and 30-day furloughs
          for
          veterans who re-enlisted. Some 157 of the grizzled veterans of
          the
          28th Mass re-enlisted at that time. Furloughs were extended
          during
          the winter of '63-'64.

          In Feb. of 1864, Colonel Richard Byrnes and four officers
          returned to
          Massachusetts to recruit for the regiment whose numbers had been
          reduced to approx. 200 men. The recruiting proceeded splendidly,
          with nearly 300 new recruits joining the rolls. In March, Col.
          Byrnes was presented with a new green flag at the Parker House
          in
          Boston. He made the following remarks:

          "I can promise you no more, than to assure you that (this flag)
          will
          be a fresh incentive to the brave men who are periling their
          lives
          in defense of that flag which typifies Union and liberty, and
          beneath which the shamrock has ever bloomed. In a few days, this
          flag will throw its emerald folds to the breeze, and the smoke
          of
          battle will encircle it; its freshness and beauty may be
          tarnished,
          but while there is an Irish arm to strike in its defense, its
          honor
          shall never, never be sullied or impaired. I can only point to
          the
          past history of my regiment to vouch for the future. Neither
          Massachusetts nor the historic fame of our race need blush for
          such a
          regiment."

          Col. Byrnes did not rejoin the regiment until May 20. In the
          meantime, the regiment had been heavily engaged in the
          Wilderness
          and Spotsylvania. Since the records indicate that the regiment's
          strength exceeded 300 in those battles, the recruits must have
          returned to the regiment earlier than Byrnes did.

          The scenario that we would like to depict for Riverton is a
          small
          mixed detail of the 28th Mass made up of new recruits preparing
          to
          head toward the seat of war for the first time and veterans who
          are
          returning from furlough. The detail is gathering at training
          camp
          under the direction of Captain Bryda. The time is late March of
          1864
          and the place is a generic, unspecified rural town to the West
          of
          Boston. Since we are in training camp we have the luxury of
          wedge
          tents, camp furniture, commissary gear and other amenities as
          provided by the generous local citizens. While we are engaged
          in the important military tasks that require our attention
          during
          the day, we are also able to let off a little steam on the eve
          of
          our impending departure to the South. There is likely to be
          music,
          light spirits, and a festive air in the evening. We even have a
          brand new green flag!

          The setting is likely to provide for a "semi-immersion" event,
          with
          many opportunities for first person interaction within the
          ranks,
          with the period civilians and with the modern spectators. Use of
          first person is strongly encouraged. This is a "campaign
          attitude"
          event even though the historical scenario calls for a garrison
          camp.
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