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Re: [NewBassClarinetGroup] A question...

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  • Bobby Mcclellan
    In all of the local groups I play in other than a chamber orchestra there are bass clarinet part, but in the chamber orchestra they are rare Bobby Sent from my
    Message 1 of 13 , May 11, 2010
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      In all of the local groups I play in other than a chamber orchestra there are bass clarinet part, but in the chamber orchestra they are rare

      Bobby
      Sent from my iPhone

      On May 11, 2010, at 10:06 AM, "Rhonda" <rhonda.tull@...> wrote:

       

      Isn't it common for a bass clarinet to be part of a symphony orchestra? Aren't bass clarinet parts common? I contacted a small community symphony orchestra conductor about playing with them next fall and the conductor told me that if there were parts available I could play.
      I found that interesting.

      Thanks!

    • john webster
      In Symphonic music the Bass Clt is usually handled (when there is a requirement) by the 3rd clarinitest as a double, whereas in concert band there
      Message 2 of 13 , May 11, 2010
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        In Symphonic music the Bass Clt is usually handled (when there is a requirement) by the 3rd clarinitest as a double, whereas in concert band there is (almost) always a Bass part.
        Now if they would include more Conta BB parts I would be happy
         
        John and Nancy Webster
        Piper Cairn Terriers



        From: Bobby Mcclellan <bmcclel@...>
        To: "NewBassClarinetGroup@yahoogroups.com" <NewBassClarinetGroup@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tue, May 11, 2010 11:16:59 AM
        Subject: Re: [NewBassClarinetGroup] A question...

         

        In all of the local groups I play in other than a chamber orchestra there are bass clarinet part, but in the chamber orchestra they are rare

        Bobby
        Sent from my iPhone

        On May 11, 2010, at 10:06 AM, "Rhonda" <rhonda.tull@ yahoo.com> wrote:

         

        Isn't it common for a bass clarinet to be part of a symphony orchestra? Aren't bass clarinet parts common? I contacted a small community symphony orchestra conductor about playing with them next fall and the conductor told me that if there were parts available I could play.
        I found that interesting.

        Thanks!

      • Bobby Mcclellan
        I fully agree about the contra parts (partial since that is what I primarily play now. Sent from my iPhone
        Message 3 of 13 , May 11, 2010
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          I fully agree about the contra parts (partial since that is what I primarily play now.

          Sent from my iPhone

          On May 11, 2010, at 10:40 AM, john webster <jwebster34@...> wrote:

           

          In Symphonic music the Bass Clt is usually handled (when there is a requirement) by the 3rd clarinitest as a double, whereas in concert band there is (almost) always a Bass part.
          Now if they would include more Conta BB parts I would be happy
           
          John and Nancy Webster
          Piper Cairn Terriers



          From: Bobby Mcclellan <bmcclel@aol. com>
          To: "NewBassClarinetGro up@yahoogroups. com" <NewBassClarinetGrou p@yahoogroups. com>
          Sent: Tue, May 11, 2010 11:16:59 AM
          Subject: Re: [NewBassClarinetGro up] A question...

           

          In all of the local groups I play in other than a chamber orchestra there are bass clarinet part, but in the chamber orchestra they are rare

          Bobby
          Sent from my iPhone

          On May 11, 2010, at 10:06 AM, "Rhonda" <rhonda.tull@ yahoo.com> wrote:

           

          Isn't it common for a bass clarinet to be part of a symphony orchestra? Aren't bass clarinet parts common? I contacted a small community symphony orchestra conductor about playing with them next fall and the conductor told me that if there were parts available I could play.
          I found that interesting.

          Thanks!

        • Ann Satterfield
          Depends on the repetoire. Bass clarinet more likely to be used in large romantic works or 20th century literature. Franck Symphony in D minor, Gershwin:
          Message 4 of 13 , May 11, 2010
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            Depends on the repetoire.  Bass clarinet more likely to be used in large romantic works or 20th century literature.
            Franck Symphony in D minor, Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue, American in Paris might be played by smallish group. 


             
            On Tue, May 11, 2010 at 11:06 AM, Rhonda <rhonda.tull@...> wrote:
             

            Isn't it common for a bass clarinet to be part of a symphony orchestra? Aren't bass clarinet parts common? I contacted a small community symphony orchestra conductor about playing with them next fall and the conductor told me that if there were parts available I could play.
            I found that interesting.

            Thanks!




            --
            Ann Satterfield
            Adjunct Music; HCC, PSC, SEU
            Principal Clarinet, Imperial Symphony
            863-224-5121
          • john webster
            I am fortunate in that the Librarian for the Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches is a clarinetest (plays mostly bass and alto) and when there is no contra or
            Message 5 of 13 , May 11, 2010
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              I am fortunate in that the Librarian for the Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches is a clarinetest (plays mostly bass and alto) and when there is no contra or suitable basss Clt part, he will write one for me or transpose the tuba part (via Computer) In theory I can transpose C bass cleff tuba parts as I play, in practice my mind and fingers don't agree.
              Of the 4 different concert bands I have played with since I got the contra only the Director of the Symphoic Band really wants to use it. I have been pleasently supprised by the number of band members and others who have said that they can actually hear it and that it adds to the bass line (we have 3 to 5 tubas). (I play Bass Clt with the other bands most of the time)
               
              John and Nancy Webster
              Piper Cairn Terriers



              From: Bobby Mcclellan <bmcclel@...>
              To: "NewBassClarinetGroup@yahoogroups.com" <NewBassClarinetGroup@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tue, May 11, 2010 11:49:27 AM
              Subject: Re: [NewBassClarinetGroup] A question...

               

              I fully agree about the contra parts (partial since that is what I primarily play now.

              Sent from my iPhone

              On May 11, 2010, at 10:40 AM, john webster <jwebster34@yahoo. com> wrote:

               

            • BandAnne@aol.com
              In the Symphonies I ve played in Bass Clarinet players were also utility clarinet players (Eb usually) Anne In a message dated 5/11/2010 9:18:34 A.M. Mountain
              Message 6 of 13 , May 22, 2010
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                In the Symphonies I've played in Bass Clarinet players were also utility clarinet players (Eb usually)
                 
                Anne
                 
                In a message dated 5/11/2010 9:18:34 A.M. Mountain Daylight Time, bmcclel@... writes:
                 

                In all of the local groups I play in other than a chamber orchestra there are bass clarinet part, but in the chamber orchestra they are rare

                Bobby
                Sent from my iPhone

                On May 11, 2010, at 10:06 AM, "Rhonda" <rhonda.tull@ yahoo.com> wrote:

                 

                Isn't it common for a bass clarinet to be part of a symphony orchestra? Aren't bass clarinet parts common? I contacted a small community symphony orchestra conductor about playing with them next fall and the conductor told me that if there were parts available I could play.
                I found that interesting.

                Thanks!

              • hajasw
                My theory is that the bass clarinet did not exist when much (most?) of the orchestral repertoire was written. I ve always been told that Adolph Sax developed
                Message 7 of 13 , May 23, 2010
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                  My theory is that the bass clarinet did not exist when much (most?) of the orchestral repertoire was written.

                  I've always been told that Adolph Sax developed the first bass clarinet that was practical to play. That was after he invented the saxaphone. Wikipedia (my best source at the moment) gives the year as 1838. About 40 years after Mozart died.

                  I do not know how much of the music commonly played by current orchestras was written since the availability of bass clarinets.

                  Cheers,
                  Wayne Hajas


                  --- In NewBassClarinetGroup@yahoogroups.com, "Rhonda" <rhonda.tull@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Isn't it common for a bass clarinet to be part of a symphony orchestra? Aren't bass clarinet parts common? I contacted a small community symphony orchestra conductor about playing with them next fall and the conductor told me that if there were parts available I could play.
                  > I found that interesting.
                  >
                  > Thanks!
                  >
                • Gary Van Cott
                  It is going to depend on the orchestra. A chamber orchestra is probably going to be playing pieces written for 2 woodwinds each and limited brass and there is
                  Message 8 of 13 , May 23, 2010
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                    It is going to depend on the orchestra. A chamber orchestra is probably
                    going to be playing pieces written for 2 woodwinds each and limited
                    brass and there is little for that combination that has bass clarinet,
                    even in pieces written long after the invention of the bass clarinet.

                    GAry
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                    hajasw wrote:
                    > My theory is that the bass clarinet did not exist when much (most?) of the orchestral repertoire was written.
                    >
                    > I've always been told that Adolph Sax developed the first bass clarinet that was practical to play. That was after he invented the saxaphone. Wikipedia (my best source at the moment) gives the year as 1838. About 40 years after Mozart died.
                    >
                    > I do not know how much of the music commonly played by current orchestras was written since the availability of bass clarinets.
                    >
                    > Cheers,
                    > Wayne Hajas
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In NewBassClarinetGroup@yahoogroups.com, "Rhonda" <rhonda.tull@...> wrote:
                    >> Isn't it common for a bass clarinet to be part of a symphony orchestra? Aren't bass clarinet parts common? I contacted a small community symphony orchestra conductor about playing with them next fall and the conductor told me that if there were parts available I could play.
                    >> I found that interesting.
                    >>
                    >> Thanks!
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Doctroid
                    ... He invented the saxophone *after* that, in 1841. Bass clarinets were around and in use before Sax s work; the first well known solo for bass clarinet is in
                    Message 9 of 13 , May 23, 2010
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                      On Sun, May 23, 2010 at 7:33 PM, hajasw <hajasw@...> wrote:

                      I've always been told that Adolph Sax developed the first bass clarinet that was practical to play. That was after he invented the saxaphone. Wikipedia (my best source at the moment) gives the year as 1838. About 40 years after Mozart died.

                      He invented the saxophone *after* that, in 1841.

                      Bass clarinets were around and in use before Sax's work; the first well known solo for bass clarinet is in Meyerbeer's opera Les Huguenots (1836), though Mercadante included a bass clarinet solo in his opera Emma d'Antiochi two years earlier.

                      Bass clarinet parts were pretty common in orchestral music by late in the 19th century, but anyone before about the 1840s — Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, and others — never wrote for the instrument.

                      - Rich Holmes

                    • revbhouse@yahoo.com
                      according to The Devil s Horn by Mike Segell, Sax radically improved the bass clarinet immediately prior to inventing the saxophone. He won an award at a
                      Message 10 of 13 , May 23, 2010
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                        according to "The Devil's Horn" by Mike Segell, Sax radically improved the bass clarinet immediately prior to inventing the saxophone. He won an award at a Paris exhibition at age 15 for an ivory flute that he built. Fascinating story, amazing individual. He is also credited with inventing the rotary valve, as seen on French horns and many tubas.      regards, Brad Houser

                        sent from my glitchy iPhone 

                        On May 23, 2010, at 7:20 PM, Doctroid <doctroid@...> wrote:

                         

                        On Sun, May 23, 2010 at 7:33 PM, hajasw <hajasw@shaw. ca> wrote:

                        I've always been told that Adolph Sax developed the first bass clarinet that was practical to play. That was after he invented the saxaphone. Wikipedia (my best source at the moment) gives the year as 1838. About 40 years after Mozart died.

                        He invented the saxophone *after* that, in 1841.

                        Bass clarinets were around and in use before Sax's work; the first well known solo for bass clarinet is in Meyerbeer's opera Les Huguenots (1836), though Mercadante included a bass clarinet solo in his opera Emma d'Antiochi two years earlier.

                        Bass clarinet parts were pretty common in orchestral music by late in the 19th century, but anyone before about the 1840s — Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, and others — never wrote for the instrument.

                        - Rich Holmes


                      • Adam Zaves
                        Adolph Sax invented the saxophone and saxhorns, as well as improving the bass clarinet. The saxhorn family was a group of conical, piston brass instruments
                        Message 11 of 13 , May 24, 2010
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                          Adolph Sax invented the saxophone and saxhorns, as well as improving the bass clarinet. The saxhorn family was a group of conical, piston brass instruments from which the euphonium evolved. 
                          The tuba was invented in 1835 by Weiprecht and Moritz, and that was a rotary valve F bass tuba. (sorry, tuba is my major..have to make sure the information is right)
                          Also, according to Wikipedia (so not sure how credible that source is) the rotary valve was invented in 1832 by Joseph Riedlin.

                          Adam Z.

                          --- On Sun, 5/23/10, revbhouse@... <revbhouse@...> wrote:

                          From: revbhouse@... <revbhouse@...>
                          Subject: Re: [NewBassClarinetGroup] Re: A question...
                          To: "NewBassClarinetGroup@yahoogroups.com" <NewBassClarinetGroup@yahoogroups.com>
                          Date: Sunday, May 23, 2010, 7:01 PM

                           

                          according to "The Devil's Horn" by Mike Segell, Sax radically improved the bass clarinet immediately prior to inventing the saxophone. He won an award at a Paris exhibition at age 15 for an ivory flute that he built. Fascinating story, amazing individual. He is also credited with inventing the rotary valve, as seen on French horns and many tubas.      regards, Brad Houser

                          sent from my glitchy iPhone 

                          On May 23, 2010, at 7:20 PM, Doctroid <doctroid@doctroid. net> wrote:

                           

                          On Sun, May 23, 2010 at 7:33 PM, hajasw <hajasw@shaw. ca> wrote:

                          I've always been told that Adolph Sax developed the first bass clarinet that was practical to play. That was after he invented the saxaphone. Wikipedia (my best source at the moment) gives the year as 1838. About 40 years after Mozart died.

                          He invented the saxophone *after* that, in 1841.

                          Bass clarinets were around and in use before Sax's work; the first well known solo for bass clarinet is in Meyerbeer's opera Les Huguenots (1836), though Mercadante included a bass clarinet solo in his opera Emma d'Antiochi two years earlier.

                          Bass clarinet parts were pretty common in orchestral music by late in the 19th century, but anyone before about the 1840s — Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, and others — never wrote for the instrument.

                          - Rich Holmes


                        • Lawrence Bocaner
                          A tuba major ought to know that the Wieprecht/Moritz tuba had Berliner pumpen valves -- cylindrical but not rotary! ... From: Adam Zaves To:
                          Message 12 of 13 , May 24, 2010
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                            A tuba major ought to know that the Wieprecht/Moritz tuba had Berliner pumpen valves -- cylindrical but not rotary!
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Monday, May 24, 2010 2:55 PM
                            Subject: Re: [NewBassClarinetGroup] Re: A question...

                             

                            Adolph Sax invented the saxophone and saxhorns, as well as improving the bass clarinet. The saxhorn family was a group of conical, piston brass instruments from which the euphonium evolved. 
                            The tuba was invented in 1835 by Weiprecht and Moritz, and that was a rotary valve F bass tuba. (sorry, tuba is my major..have to make sure the information is right)
                            Also, according to Wikipedia (so not sure how credible that source is) the rotary valve was invented in 1832 by Joseph Riedlin.

                            Adam Z.

                            --- On Sun, 5/23/10, revbhouse@yahoo. com <revbhouse@yahoo. com> wrote:

                            From: revbhouse@yahoo. com <revbhouse@yahoo. com>
                            Subject: Re: [NewBassClarinetGro up] Re: A question...
                            To: "NewBassClarinetGro up@yahoogroups. com" <NewBassClarinetGrou p@yahoogroups. com>
                            Date: Sunday, May 23, 2010, 7:01 PM

                             

                            according to "The Devil's Horn" by Mike Segell, Sax radically improved the bass clarinet immediately prior to inventing the saxophone. He won an award at a Paris exhibition at age 15 for an ivory flute that he built. Fascinating story, amazing individual. He is also credited with inventing the rotary valve, as seen on French horns and many tubas.      regards, Brad Houser

                            sent from my glitchy iPhone 

                            On May 23, 2010, at 7:20 PM, Doctroid <doctroid@doctroid. net> wrote:

                             

                            On Sun, May 23, 2010 at 7:33 PM, hajasw <hajasw@shaw. ca> wrote:

                            I've always been told that Adolph Sax developed the first bass clarinet that was practical to play. That was after he invented the saxaphone. Wikipedia (my best source at the moment) gives the year as 1838. About 40 years after Mozart died.

                            He invented the saxophone *after* that, in 1841.

                            Bass clarinets were around and in use before Sax's work; the first well known solo for bass clarinet is in Meyerbeer's opera Les Huguenots (1836), though Mercadante included a bass clarinet solo in his opera Emma d'Antiochi two years earlier.

                            Bass clarinet parts were pretty common in orchestral music by late in the 19th century, but anyone before about the 1840s — Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, and others — never wrote for the instrument.

                            - Rich Holmes


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