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Ojibwe language camp to feature more native speakers

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  • Rob Schmidt
    http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/event/article/id/171892/ Published June 21 2010 Ojibwe language camp to feature more native speakers Attendance was high last
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 25, 2010
      http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/event/article/id/171892/

      Published June 21 2010

      Ojibwe language camp to feature more native speakers
      Attendance was high last year at the first Ojibwe language immersion camp on the Fond du Lac Reservation.

      By: Jana Hollingsworth, Duluth News Tribune

      Attendance was high last year at the first Ojibwe language immersion camp on the Fond du Lac Reservation.

      This year, organizers doubled the fluent speakers to prepare for what they expect to be 300 people at the four-day event.

      "We discovered that this is what people really want to do," said organizer Jim Northrup. "There is a great need for the Anishinaabe
      people to regain their language."

      The camp, beginning Thursday and running through Sunday, is at Kiwenz Campground, formerly Molstad's, in Sawyer.

      It runs from morning until evening each day, packed with activities that encourage the use of Ojibwe, including making birch bark
      baskets, wild rice poles and knockers, flutes, pottery, hand drums and bannock-on-a-stick. Canoe races and other activities for kids
      will be held.

      It's a unique immersion camp, Northrup said, because it includes traditional arts, crafts and instruments in the learning of the
      language. Organizers expect people from reservations across Minnesota and Wisconsin.

      "Ojibwes have been taught that the Creator likes to hear us in our native language," said Ivy Vainio, a member of the planning
      committee. "There is an importance to connecting the people of today to the people who came before."

      Anyone who wants to begin learning Ojibwe or explore the culture is welcome. Three meals a day will be shared.

      Northrup remembers a moment from last year's camp, when adults were talking inside makeshift domes.

      "The kids were all out on the playground swinging and sliding, and they were teaching each other, 'No, say it like this: Boozhoo,'"
      he said, which means "hello."

      "That was my favorite part."

      IF YOU GO

      The second annual Nagaajiwanaang Ojibwe Language Immersion Camp begins about 8:30 a.m. Thursday and runs through Sunday with daily
      activities. Camping at the site, the former Molstad's Campground in Sawyer, is free but on a first-come, first-served basis. Meals
      are provided, but dishes to share and nondisposable dishware are requested. Call Jim Northrup at (218) 878-0245 with questions.
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