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Gallery shows art by Native Americans

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  • Robert Schmidt
    http://www.pioneerlocal.com/arlingtonheights/entertainment/1021637,db-powwo w-062608-s2.article Gallery shows art by Native Americans June 26, 2008 Recommend
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 26, 2008
      http://www.pioneerlocal.com/arlingtonheights/entertainment/1021637,db-powwo
      w-062608-s2.article

      Gallery shows art by Native Americans

      June 26, 2008
      Recommend

      Stroll through Trickster Gallery in Schaumburg, and you'll come across
      paintings by established artists like Le'Ana Asher and Leonard Peltier. But
      when you step into the room devoted to "Spirited Daughters," the mood
      changes.

      Artworks of all shapes and sizes adorn the walls, from schoolgirl Vlora
      Xhaferi's notebook cover sketch of native women under the stars to Adrian
      Silas' lush, beaded painting of a bear holding a fish in its mouth.

      "Spirited Daughters," the first-annual celebration of art by young American
      Indian women and girls, is the brainchild of Chicago resident Jasmine
      Alfonso, the 2008 Miss Indian Chicago.

      "The idea was to get young native girls engaged in the arts," said
      Stephanie Dean, a 31-year-old photographer and poet who served on the
      selection committee. "We wanted them to express themselves because a lot of
      these girls might not have done so otherwise."

      Dean, Alfonso and other American Indian women worked on encouraging native
      girls to submit their artwork. The end result is a hodgepodge of about 50
      pieces in all mediums and covering many themes.

      "About 50 percent of the work has a native theme," Dean said. "If it's not
      obvious to a non-native, it's obvious to us."

      For an example, she pointed to one girl's rendering of a group of animals,
      including mice, a ferret, butterflies and a crane.

      "It seems to me she started to put together a picture of a ceremony," Dean
      said.

      The purpose of the exhibition, she said, was to encourage American Indian
      girls and young women to both gain confidence in the arts and to draw
      inspiration from their heritage.

      "We want to celebrate what we can do," Dean said.
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