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Protesters keep heat on radio show

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  • Robert Schmidt
    http://www.newsobserver.com/105/story/1045495.html Published: Apr 22, 2008 12:30 AM Modified: Apr 22, 2008 07:26 AM Protesters keep heat on radio show Danny
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 24, 2008
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      http://www.newsobserver.com/105/story/1045495.html

      Published: Apr 22, 2008 12:30 AM
      Modified: Apr 22, 2008 07:26 AM

      Protesters keep heat on radio show

      Danny Hooley, Staff Writer

      RALEIGH - About 30 people showed up at the State Capitol on Monday to say
      they're not letting up the pressure on G-105 and "Bob and The Showgram" for
      offensive comments about American Indians.

      Speakers called for the firing of the popular morning-radio- show crew and
      a boycott of the show's advertisers. Attendees held signs saying "Stop Hate
      Media" and "I am not a stereotype."

      The protest drew mostly younger Indians, who disagree with the leadership
      of the N.C. Commission of Indian Affairs and the Lumbee Tribe of North
      Carolina. Those organizations publicly accepted apologies from Showgram
      host Bob Dumas and WDCG's general manager, Dick Harlow, last week, and
      backed off calls to fire the on-air crew.

      "Our leaders were working behind the scenes to come to some type of
      resolution, and the people didn't really have any type of say-so into
      that," said Beth Jacobs, the organizer of Monday's protest. "People were
      really outraged."

      Jacobs, a 2007 graduate of the UNC School of Law, is founder of Brown
      Babies, an advocacy group for children in poor communities.

      Harlow declined to comment about Monday's protest.

      Widespread anger erupted earlier this month when Dumas and his co-hosts,
      Mike Morse and "Kentucky Kristin," joked on the air with an intern about
      her coming wedding to a Lumbee. In a 15-minute segment, Dumas said that
      Indians were statistically "lazy." The morning crew also made jokes that
      played on Indian stereotypes.

      The NAACP also has expressed support for protesters. And toward the end of
      the Monday, members of the Hispanic advocacy group El Pueblo Inc. showed up
      to offer their support to protesters.

      On April 2, the day after the offending remarks about Indians, The Showgram
      sent a producer to the Mexican Consulate on Six Forks Road in Raleigh to
      ask people in line if they had proof of U.S. citizenship, while Dumas made
      comments about "illegals" on the air from the studio.

      At the gathering Monday, Irene Godinez, advocacy director of El Pueblo,
      told those gathered, "We're here to say that, we're going to stick this out
      with you, and we want to be of support to you."

      Afterward, Godinez said she would add herself to a Facebook page that
      protests "The Showgram." The morning show also was blasted on
      www.citizensagainsthate.com, which monitors and reports racism and hate
      groups.

      Jill Warren Lucas, director of public affairs at the N.C. Department of
      Administration, said a new partnership between the Commission of Indian
      Affairs and Clear Channel Communications will be announced at a 10 a.m.
      news conference Thursday. Clear Channel owns G-105.

      danny.hooley@... or (919) 829-4728
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