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USA Today Dubs Sherman Alexie One of 2007's Biggest Authors

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  • Robert Schmidt
    http://www.mediabistro.com/galleycat/authors/usa_today_dubs_sherman_alexie_ one_of_2007s_biggest_authors_73520.asp Friday, Dec 21 USA Today Dubs Sherman Alexie
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 24, 2007
      http://www.mediabistro.com/galleycat/authors/usa_today_dubs_sherman_alexie_
      one_of_2007s_biggest_authors_73520.asp

      Friday, Dec 21
      USA Today Dubs Sherman Alexie One of 2007's Biggest Authors

      I have a hunch that when the top twenty names on USA Today pop culture
      blogger Whitney Matheson's "Hot 100" list for 2007 come out later today, J.
      K. Rowling is going to be somewhere close to #1, but for now, the
      highest-ranking author on the list is National Book Award winner Sherman
      Alexie at #23, and Matheson threw in a supplementary interview with Alexie,
      who has done a fantastic job of reinventing himself as a YA author with The
      Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. (Seriously: I don't care how
      old you are. Read this book.)

      She brings up the fact that, while it's easy to think of the novel as
      "Native American YA," it's also a powerful story about the effect of
      poverty on young lives. "There isn't a lot of poverty literature in the
      young-adult world," Alexie concedes. "And I don't know why that is, but I
      think certainly I felt a gap. I don't think there's a whole lot of class
      literature at all. I think most of that has become racially based, and
      people don't think of it as being class literature... I think we're all
      ashamed of it, whether we are poor or we're also ashamed that in this
      incredibly wealthy country, a lot of people could be that poor."

      Alexie also speaks to the book's content, which isn't really any less
      mature than what he's been writing in his "adult" fiction for years, just
      with a slight shift in tone: "The problem is that too many adults think
      their kids' lives are simple, or they try to make their lives simple, when
      their emotional lives are just as complicated as ours. They might have a
      few less tools to deal with it because they're young, but the emotions are
      all the same, and the subject matter is all the same."
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