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Report Card rates BC schools on Aboriginal students' academic achievem...

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  • Don
    ... From: CNW Portfolio System To: Portfolio E-Mail Sent: Thursday, February 09, 2006 6:01 AM Subject: Report Card rates BC schools on Aboriginal students
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 9, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: CNW Portfolio System
      To: Portfolio E-Mail
      Sent: Thursday, February 09, 2006 6:01 AM
      Subject: Report Card rates BC schools on Aboriginal students' academic achievem...



      CNW Group Portfolio E-Mail


      THE FRASER INSTITUTE




      Transmitted by CNW Group on : February 9, 2006 09:00
      Report Card rates BC schools on Aboriginal students' academic achievement: some improvement made but more progress needed

      VANCOUVER, Feb. 9 /CNW/ - Academic results among British Columbia's
      Aboriginal students show some improvement, but much more progress is needed to
      narrow the gap between them and their non-Aboriginal classmates, according to
      the Report Card on Aboriginal Education in British Columbia: 2006 Edition,
      released today by The Fraser Institute.
      The province's Aboriginal students still lag behind non-Aboriginal
      students on provincial tests at grades 4, 7, and 12. In addition, fewer
      Aboriginal students complete school and those who do graduate take longer to
      do so. Aboriginal students also take fewer of the core senior level academic
      courses that are often needed for many post-secondary programs.
      "The good news is that there are some encouraging signs of progress,"
      said Peter Cowley, co-author and the Institute's director of school
      performance studies. "Aboriginal results on reading and numeracy tests at both
      grades 4 and 7 are improving, although not enough to close the gap with the
      general student population. In addition, more Aboriginal students in grades 9,
      10, and 12 are successfully completing their school year."
      The Report Card compares the results of Aboriginal students at 65
      elementary schools and 50 secondary schools in BC - both public and private.
      It uses detailed Aboriginal students' academic results, obtained from the BC
      Ministry of Education, to assess how well each school is performing with
      respect to its Aboriginal students.
      Among the schools rated in the Report Card, several have shown
      consistently strong performance over the last five school years. Sk'aadgaa
      Naay in Skidegate, Seal Cove in Prince Rupert, and David Hoy Elementary in
      Fort St. James - all elementary schools - stand out in this regard. Among the
      secondary schools, South Peace Secondary in Dawson Creek, Caledonia Secondary
      in Terrace, and Nisga'a School in New Aiyansh have shown significant
      improvement in their Aboriginal students' academic results in the last five
      years.

      First Ministers' Initiative in Jeopardy

      Following a well-publicized First Ministers' meeting with national
      Aboriginal leaders in November 2005, the participants pledged to ensure that
      the current difference between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students in their
      secondary school graduation rates would be eliminated within ten years.
      "This is a worthwhile but ambitious goal," said Cowley. "The success of
      this First Ministers' initiative depends in large part on the willingness of
      Aboriginal leaders to ensure that all Aboriginal children participate in
      provincial assessment programs and that their results are made publicly
      available."
      Unlike in BC, in most provinces the academic results of Aboriginal
      students are kept hidden from public scrutiny. "In the absence of such public
      disclosure, it is unlikely that the target of graduation rate parity by 2016
      will be met," he pointed out.
      Cowley argues that every successful improvement plan must begin with
      measurement. "By focusing public attention on the results of Aboriginal
      students in every province, we can encourage and assist those parents,
      teachers, school administrators, and Aboriginal and ministry officials who are
      currently working to improve Aboriginal student outcomes," he said.

      About the Report Card

      The overall rating of each secondary school included in the Report Card
      is based on the criteria used in the Institute's annual Report Card on BC's
      Secondary Schools; while the criteria for the elementary schools is the same
      used in the Institute's annual Report Card on BC's Elementary Schools.
      Detailed school results are posted at www.fraserinstitute.ca.

      -------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Established in 1974, The Fraser Institute is an independent public policy
      organization with offices in Vancouver, Calgary, and Toronto.

      The media release and the complete text and rankings of the Report Card
      (in PDF) are available at www.fraserinstitute.ca.




      -30-

      /For further information: Peter Cowley, Director of School Performance
      Studies, The Fraser Institute, (604) 714-4556, Mobile (604) 789-0475, Email
      peterc@...; Suzanne Walters, Director of Communications, The
      Fraser Institute, Telephone (604) 714-4582, Email
      suzannew@.../

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Don
      ... From: CNW Portfolio System To: Portfolio E-Mail Sent: Thursday, February 09, 2006 6:01 AM Subject: Report Card rates BC schools on Aboriginal students
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 9, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: CNW Portfolio System
        To: Portfolio E-Mail
        Sent: Thursday, February 09, 2006 6:01 AM
        Subject: Report Card rates BC schools on Aboriginal students' academic achievem...



        CNW Group Portfolio E-Mail


        THE FRASER INSTITUTE




        Transmitted by CNW Group on : February 9, 2006 09:00
        Report Card rates BC schools on Aboriginal students' academic achievement: some improvement made but more progress needed

        VANCOUVER, Feb. 9 /CNW/ - Academic results among British Columbia's
        Aboriginal students show some improvement, but much more progress is needed to
        narrow the gap between them and their non-Aboriginal classmates, according to
        the Report Card on Aboriginal Education in British Columbia: 2006 Edition,
        released today by The Fraser Institute.
        The province's Aboriginal students still lag behind non-Aboriginal
        students on provincial tests at grades 4, 7, and 12. In addition, fewer
        Aboriginal students complete school and those who do graduate take longer to
        do so. Aboriginal students also take fewer of the core senior level academic
        courses that are often needed for many post-secondary programs.
        "The good news is that there are some encouraging signs of progress,"
        said Peter Cowley, co-author and the Institute's director of school
        performance studies. "Aboriginal results on reading and numeracy tests at both
        grades 4 and 7 are improving, although not enough to close the gap with the
        general student population. In addition, more Aboriginal students in grades 9,
        10, and 12 are successfully completing their school year."
        The Report Card compares the results of Aboriginal students at 65
        elementary schools and 50 secondary schools in BC - both public and private.
        It uses detailed Aboriginal students' academic results, obtained from the BC
        Ministry of Education, to assess how well each school is performing with
        respect to its Aboriginal students.
        Among the schools rated in the Report Card, several have shown
        consistently strong performance over the last five school years. Sk'aadgaa
        Naay in Skidegate, Seal Cove in Prince Rupert, and David Hoy Elementary in
        Fort St. James - all elementary schools - stand out in this regard. Among the
        secondary schools, South Peace Secondary in Dawson Creek, Caledonia Secondary
        in Terrace, and Nisga'a School in New Aiyansh have shown significant
        improvement in their Aboriginal students' academic results in the last five
        years.

        First Ministers' Initiative in Jeopardy

        Following a well-publicized First Ministers' meeting with national
        Aboriginal leaders in November 2005, the participants pledged to ensure that
        the current difference between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students in their
        secondary school graduation rates would be eliminated within ten years.
        "This is a worthwhile but ambitious goal," said Cowley. "The success of
        this First Ministers' initiative depends in large part on the willingness of
        Aboriginal leaders to ensure that all Aboriginal children participate in
        provincial assessment programs and that their results are made publicly
        available."
        Unlike in BC, in most provinces the academic results of Aboriginal
        students are kept hidden from public scrutiny. "In the absence of such public
        disclosure, it is unlikely that the target of graduation rate parity by 2016
        will be met," he pointed out.
        Cowley argues that every successful improvement plan must begin with
        measurement. "By focusing public attention on the results of Aboriginal
        students in every province, we can encourage and assist those parents,
        teachers, school administrators, and Aboriginal and ministry officials who are
        currently working to improve Aboriginal student outcomes," he said.

        About the Report Card

        The overall rating of each secondary school included in the Report Card
        is based on the criteria used in the Institute's annual Report Card on BC's
        Secondary Schools; while the criteria for the elementary schools is the same
        used in the Institute's annual Report Card on BC's Elementary Schools.
        Detailed school results are posted at www.fraserinstitute.ca.

        -------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Established in 1974, The Fraser Institute is an independent public policy
        organization with offices in Vancouver, Calgary, and Toronto.

        The media release and the complete text and rankings of the Report Card
        (in PDF) are available at www.fraserinstitute.ca.




        -30-

        /For further information: Peter Cowley, Director of School Performance
        Studies, The Fraser Institute, (604) 714-4556, Mobile (604) 789-0475, Email
        peterc@...; Suzanne Walters, Director of Communications, The
        Fraser Institute, Telephone (604) 714-4582, Email
        suzannew@.../

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