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Major artifact discovered

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  • Don
    Thursday, February 1, 2007 Major artifact discovered by MARK NIELSEN Citizen staff http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/ The archaeological dig next to the Simon
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 1, 2007
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      Thursday, February 1, 2007



      Major artifact discovered


      by MARK NIELSEN Citizen staff

      http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/

      The archaeological dig next to the Simon Fraser Bridge has turned up at least one potentially significant artifact.

      A 14-centimetre-long bi-face arrowhead has been uncovered at the site, located in the infield off the ramp from Queensway onto the bridge, archaeologist Aidan Burford said Wednesday.

      Precisely how old it may be is still to be determined -- results from carbon dating are not back -- but Burford estimates it's 8,000 years old based on similar findings further down the Fraser River.

      The province wants to twin the bridge and in the days leading up to the start of that project had contracted archaeologists to conduct a dig at the site. After an initial search found nearly 60 cache pits, once used to store everything from salmon to berries, a more intensive investigation was launched.

      Along with the arrowhead, Aidan said plenty of "cobble tools" used for cracking bones, chopping and butchering game have been uncovered. It's believed the location was used primarily as a cooking and food processing site as opposed to a full-fledged village.

      Tony Bennett, the transportation ministry's director for the project, said the findings won't affect plans to twin the bridge. He said archaeologists, assisted by a crew of four First Nations people, will have wrapped up the bulk of their work by early March, although they may return for a further month next spring or summer.

      Contracts for design and construction are still to be awarded, but work on the twinning is expected to start next summer and finish in spring 2009.

      The bridge project was put on hold in September after an attempt to find someone to carry out both design and construction resulted in the lowest bid coming in $15 million higher than the $32.5 million the government had budgeted. The project has since been split into two with separate contracts to be awarded for design and construction.


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