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BPA-free plastic containers may be just as hazardous : BPS

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  • Teresa Binstock
    BPA-free plastic containers may be just as hazardous By Jenna
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 12, 2014
      BPA-free plastic containers may be just as hazardous

      By Jenna Bilbrey
      Scientific American 12 August 2014

      BPS was a favored replacement for BPA because it was thought to be more resistant to leaching. If people consumed less of the chemical, the idea went, it would not cause any or only minimal harm. Yet BPS is getting out. Nearly 81 percent of Americans have detectable levels of BPS in their urine.

      And once it enters the body it can affect cells in ways that parallel BPA. A 2013 study by Cheryl Watson at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that even picomolar concentrations (less than one part per trillion) of BPS can disrupt a cell’s normal functioning, which could potentially lead to metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity, asthma, birth defects or even cancer.




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