Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Making the Case for Eating Fruit - NYT

Expand Messages
  • Teresa Binstock
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/07/31/making-the-case-for-eating-fruit/ Making the Case for Eating Fruit By SOPHIE EGAN Experts agree that we are eating too
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 1, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/07/31/making-the-case-for-eating-fruit/


      Making the Case for Eating Fruit

      By SOPHIE EGAN

      Experts agree that we are eating too much sugar, which is contributing
      to obesity and other health problems. But in the rush to avoid sugar,
      many low-carb dieters and others are avoiding fruits. But fresh fruit
      should not become a casualty in the sugar wars, many nutrition experts say.

      Dr. David Ludwig, the director of the New Balance Foundation Obesity
      Prevention Center at Boston Children's Hospital, said that sugar
      consumed in fruit is not linked to any adverse health effects, no matter
      how much you eat. In a recent perspective piece in The Journal of the
      American Medical Association, he cited observational studies that showed
      that increased fruit consumption is tied to lower body weight and a
      lower risk of obesity-associated diseases.

      Whole fruits, he explained, contain a bounty of antioxidants and
      healthful nutrients, and their cellular scaffolding, made of fiber,
      makes us feel full and provides other metabolic benefits. When you bite
      into an apple, for example, the fruit's fiber helps slow your absorption
      of fructose, the main sugar in most fruits. But fiber is not the full story.

      "You can't just take an 8-ounce glass of cola and add a serving of
      Metamucil and create a health food," Dr. Ludwig said. "Even though the
      fructose-to-fiber ratio might be the same as an apple, the biological
      effects would be much different."

      Fiber provides "its greatest benefit when the cell walls that contain it
      remain intact," he said. Sugars are effectively sequestered in the
      fruit's cells, he explained, and it takes time for the digestive tract
      to break down those cells. The sugars therefore enter the bloodstream
      slowly, giving the liver more time to metabolize them. Four apples may
      contain the same amount of sugar as 24 ounces of soda, but the slow rate
      of absorption minimizes any surge in blood sugar. Repeated surges in
      blood sugar make the pancreas work harder and can contribute to insulin
      resistance, thereby increasing the risk for Type 2 diabetes.

      "If we take a nutrient-centric approach, just looking at sugar grams on
      the label, none of this is evident," Dr. Ludwig said. "So it really
      requires a whole foods view."....




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.