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Re: [NapoleonicFireandFury] Re: Artillery Basing - Russians, etc - AGAIN !!

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  • fabros1
    Or perhaps you should find a set of rules that meets your expectation when it comes to Russian batteries and leave the simplicity and beauty that is Age of
    Message 1 of 49 , Jan 3, 2011
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      Or perhaps you should find a set of rules that meets your expectation when it comes to Russian batteries and leave the simplicity and beauty that is Age of Eagles to the rest of us old dogs who are too old to deal with complicated musings regarding the function of the number of guns, power, training, time of day, weather when it comes to rolling a d10 to determine if I hit a target or not based on the tables the good Colonel has established for his set of rules.



      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Drew Jarman
      To: NapoleonicFireandFury@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, January 03, 2011 2:52 PM
      Subject: Re: [NapoleonicFireandFury] Re: Artillery Basing - Russians, etc - AGAIN !!



      Mike

      Russian batteries are factored as 12 guns in the rules hence their high fire factor compared to other nations. They fire like French Old Guard artillery. Bill has clearly stated that IF you want to deploy HALF a Russian battery as a six gun “unit” feel free to do so but treat it as damaged firing at half effect as it in effect half the number of guns firing. The Russians had major problems with the gun reliability, poor powder and windage of balls which has been covered to death in the past which has been factored out of the rules because they are 12 guns instead of most other nations 8 or 6 gun batteries.

      Now if the fire points for artillery was done on a small table based on range to target, gunner quality [like the troops], tube size [heavy and light] and number of barrels firing then a lot of these problem would vanish overnight but that is not something Bill wishes to consider as it goes against the simplified nature of AoE when it comes to firing resolution.

      Perhaps it is something you might consider looking at as an exercise for your own satisfaction?

      Drew

      From: SPAR Prestatyn
      Sent: Monday, January 03, 2011 10:13 PM
      To: NapoleonicFireandFury@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [NapoleonicFireandFury] Re: Artillery Basing - Russians, etc

      I think you have to be carful in this instance
      Russian batteries were probably deployed
      As 2 separate batteries. It is more than likely
      As I have just done, they will be refered to as batteries
      After all a Prussian Brigade is a Division no matter
      what you call it.
      Today the 1st. Mercians are the Cheshires
      as far as the old hands are concerned.
      It's a matter of task not the name.

      Regards

      Mike

      Sent from iPhone

      On 3 Jan 2011, at 16:13, "Drew Jarman" <mailto:andrewjarman%40ntlworld.com> wrote:

      > Davout deployed pairs of guns at Auerstadt but the rules are not written at that sort of micro level. Bill did say feel free to deploy half batteries as per the rules for the Russians and make them count as damaged, you pays your money and takes your choice.
      >
      > Drew
      >
      > From: william haggart
      > Sent: Monday, January 03, 2011 3:01 PM
      > To: mailto:NapoleonicFireandFury%40yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [NapoleonicFireandFury] Re: Artillery Basing - Russians, etc
      >
      > Drew wrote:
      > "Yes the Russians COULD deploy as two six gun half batteries but in reality
      > they didn't do it that much..."
      >
      > Drew:
      >
      > Well, I don't know what 'do it much' means statistically, but the Russians
      > seem to have done it at will 1812 and after. Read Zhmodikovs' 2 volumes on
      > Russian Tactics and
      > Mikaberidze's book on the Battle of Borodino. Lots of examples of six gun
      > sections being used independently.
      >
      > And I second Bill's Aaaaaargh! This is an old issue. Archives to the front!
      >
      > Bill H.
      >
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      >
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      >
      >

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    • Allan F Mountford
      Hi Mike Position batteries consisted of four medium 12 lb. guns, four short 12 lb. guns, and four half-pood unicorn gun-howitzers. Light batteries consisted of
      Message 49 of 49 , Jan 21, 2011
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        Hi Mike

        Position batteries consisted of four medium 12 lb. guns, four short 12 lb. guns, and four half-pood unicorn gun-howitzers. Light batteries consisted of eight 6 lb. guns and four quarter-pood unicorn gun-howitzers.

        Position batteries formed up from the right as two unicorns, four medium 12 ib, guns, four short 12 ib. guns and two unicorns. Light batteries formed up from the right as two unicorns, eight 6 ib. guns and two unicorns.

        Intervals between pieces was either 15 paces axle to axle or 22 paces between centrelines of barrels.

        There is a mountain of detail in the Zhmodikov work on the Russian army. Highly recommended.

        - Allan


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: SPAR Prestatyn
        To: NapoleonicFireandFury@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, January 21, 2011 1:39 PM
        Subject: Re: [NapoleonicFireandFury] RE: Russain 1/2 batteries



        Hi Allan,
        Do you know how the Batteries were formed
        ie. Guns, licorns and howitzers?
        Also did the mixed batteries fire every piece
        At the same target, or split the fire?
        Shot on one formation, shells at another?

        Regards

        Mike

        Sent from iPhone

        On 20 Jan 2011, at 19:50, "Allan F Mountford" <allan.mountford@...> wrote:

        > Simon
        >
        > Absolutely correct. The Russians deployed 18 guns in the Great Redoubt: 12 guns from the 26th Battery Company and 6 guns from the 47th Light Company.
        >
        > ;-)
        >
        > - Allan
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Simon Jennings
        > To: NapoleonicFireandFury@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Thursday, January 20, 2011 7:30 PM
        > Subject: Re: [NapoleonicFireandFury] RE: Russain 1/2 batteries
        >
        > Ahhh,
        >
        > that explains why the French were twice able to storm the grand redoubt - that pesky 1/2 battery was giving the russians a -2 modifier!
        >
        > --- On Wed, 19/1/11, Drew Jarman <andrewjarman@...> wrote:
        >
        > From: Drew Jarman <andrewjarman@...>
        > Subject: Re: [NapoleonicFireandFury] RE: Russain 1/2 batteries
        > To: NapoleonicFireandFury@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Wednesday, 19 January, 2011, 22:26
        >
        > Well I think the whole point is if you deploy half batteries using the original AoE FP table then they fire and fight as damaged.
        >
        > If you want to use a half battery thats the penalty within the rules as currently written.
        >
        > So are some Russian commanders now claiming they are hard done by by the old FP table and want their cake and eat it?
        >
        > Drew
        >
        > From: Simon Jennings
        >
        > Sent: Wednesday, January 19, 2011 9:42 PM
        >
        > To: NapoleonicFireandFury@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Subject: [NapoleonicFireandFury] RE: Russain 1/2 batteries
        >
        > How would the 6 gun russian batteries fare in bayonet and sabre - given they have comparable strength to other nations 6 gun batteries, should they count as damaged?
        >
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