Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Does Know-Ped Have Air-Filled Tires?

Expand Messages
  • ww77f
    Hi, As others have pointed out, they are solid rubber tires. However, users report it provides a noticeably smoother ride than other scooters (e.g. A5,
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 1, 2011
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi,
      As others have pointed out, they are solid rubber tires. However, users report it provides a noticeably smoother ride than other scooters (e.g. A5, Xooter, not so sure about the "Micro Black" (not many have that model)). The smoother ride is probably due to the use of softer tire material and the fact the tires i think are wider. Here's a user review from Amazon.com comparing the A5 and Knowped. The xooter would be similar to the A5 in ride, I'm told, maybe harsher even.


      http://www.amazon.com/Razor-A5-Lux-Scooter/product-reviews/B004C6BGII/ref=cm_cr_pr_btm_link_next_4?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=0&pageNumber=4&sortBy=bySubmissionDateDescending

      "Scooter Comparison, Razor A5, Go-Peds, Airwalk Grande, December 28, 2010"

      As new reviews are added to the Amazon product page the link above will no longer be accurate, so you'll have then list the reviews by date and find it that way.


      Will
    • Valerie Yaros
      Hello Fernando -- and everyone -- this is the first time I have replied to a post for the group, although I have been reading them for many months. I bought
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 1, 2011
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello Fernando -- and everyone -- this is the first time I have replied to a post for the group, although I have been reading them for many months.  I bought my Know-Ped in August 2009 (without being able to test it out, as no one carried them) and use it constantly -- although I had never been on a scooter in my life before.  Unless you are riding on very lumpy or textured pavement, vibration is no major problem -- I even ride it sometimes in flat semi-dress shoes with thin rubber soles.  The scooter one of the wisest purchases I've ever made -- particularly in these years of high gasoline prices-- AND it is made in the United States, which is a rare thing in itself.
         
        I only test-rode a Xootr once, at a bike shop in El Segundo (CA) and although it had delightful "glide" indeed along the smooth bike shop floor, I felt the hard, narrow tires would be less "safe/stable" over bumps and cracks in the sidewalk than my trusty Know-Ped.
         
        The Know-Ped's large solid rubber tires also give the peace of mind that comes with NO FLATS.  I ride the Know-Ped several times a week on a flat two-mile round trip down Wilshire Blvd. (in the Miracle Mile area of Los Angeles) to the Curves at Wilshire & Highland and also to do short errands around Studio City (flat terrain with one large hill).
         
        My best Know-Ped "story" comes with Pres. Obama's visit to Los Angeles last August which caused a monumental traffic nightmare, as he was at a private home in Hancock Park just a few blocks from my Wilshire/Highland destination -- traffic was at a frustrated crawl and police barricades were everywhere.  But for those on foot/bike/scooter on the sidewalks, no problem -- and I happily glided along on my Know-Ped to my destination. 
         
        Oddly, after nearly two years' use of the know-Ped -- I have never seen another.  And I have only seen a Xootr once (and one small black Kickbike in addition to my yellow one). Los Angeles is filled people on bicycles, but not kick scooters.
         
        Valerie Y.
         
         
      • Filibogado
        Hi Valerie: Thanks for such a helpful post. It came just in the nick of time, as I already had the Xootr MG in my shopping cart, but kept hesitating because of
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 2, 2011
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment

          Hi Valerie:

          Thanks for such a helpful post. It came just in the nick of time, as I already had the Xootr MG in my shopping cart, but kept hesitating because of one troubling review in Amazon, a portion of which I quote below:

          "Unfortunately, (the Xooter)  keeps trying to kill me.

          Every time I hit a discontinuity on the road surface of more than a half-inch (a crack in the pavement, the edge of a metal plate placed on the street for repairs) the Xootr tries to take me on a 360 degree head-over-heels ride with the final destination, no doubt, being my head splashed on the pavement like a watermelon. (So far I've managed to leap off in time.)

          Every time I ride it now it's with intense fear and concentration, scanning the road surface with life-and-death intensity, ready to leap aside and tumble should I hit a bump."

          I am a mature baby boomer, and all I wanted to do was take out a scooter during lunch break, leisurely and safely scoot in front of and around the White House and down the Washington DC Mall area while dressed in my federal worker attire (dress shoes, long-sleeve shirt and tie, leaving the suit in the office). My sense of fashion says that the Xootr would be a more elegant solution because I could slip it into its bag and sneak out of the office without attracting attention, then unfold the scooter incognito once I'm out there, then sneaking back into the office. I've never seen a kick scooter in downtown DC, though there are lots of rental bikes and Segways. I guess there's a guy in the Veterans Admin agency who has one but I haven't seen him ride it.

          Given my probably irrational fear (as in "Help! I'm falling, I can't get up!" ) of  falling, the pendulum is swinging again from the elegance of the Xootr design to the safety of the Goped which your post helped solidify in my mind. As to portability, I plan to take the scooter about once a week from home to the office and back, so as long as it fits in the commuter bus on my lap or between my legs, the Goped might fit the bill.

          Finally, I am such a slow and bad rider that I once took the Virginia Motorcycle Safety course and I flunked because I could not negotiate a curve at high speed without slowing down. So I guess a slow, lumbering Goped would not be so bad after all.

          Thanks again, and I guess I'll wait till this pm in case others want to weigh in on this issue - what will it be: the elegance and portability of the Xootr or the comfort and safety of the Goped? Decisions, decisions, decisions ...tsk, tsk, tsk.

          --- In NYCKickScooters@yahoogroups.com, Valerie Yaros <vyaros@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello Fernando -- and everyone -- this is the first time I have replied to a
          > post for the group, although I have been reading them for many months. I
          > bought my Know-Ped in August 2009 (without being able to test it out, as no
          > one carried them) and use it constantly -- although I had never been on a
          > scooter in my life before.

        • L
          I would like to put in my $0.02 I am somewhat of an avid standup scooter fan (to put it mildly). I have 2 Xootrs, Razors (A5 Lux, A3), several Gopeds (gas and
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 2, 2011
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            I would like to put in my $0.02

            I am somewhat of an avid standup scooter fan (to put it mildly). I have 2 Xootrs, Razors (A5 Lux, A3), several Gopeds (gas and electric) and various other motorized scooters.

            Here's my take on ride comfort:

            Xootr Street - good low rolling resistance, the wheels are wide enough to be safe on the sidewalk and on the street - you should always keep your eye on the road regardless - I always look ahead for any pot holes or cracks - I have not had any problems with falling due to surface imperfections. I have both front and rear brakes on these and overall it works well for stopping - no abrupt locking up of the wheels when braking.

            Razor A5 - also good rolling resistance, wheels are about the same, perhaps a bit narrower, rear brakes work OK, no abrupt stops.

            Goped Sport - this is a similar setup as the Knowped, except for the fact that there's a gas motor in the back. Overall good for the street - the wheels have a definitely wider track for cracks, but again, larger potholes will still be a problem. One thing to note, I had an "incident" last year where I was just riding back/forth in my backyard and hit the front brakes which caused me to fall forward, ending up tearing a tendon on my big toe....ouch.... it was likely mostly my fault, but the brakes are definitely "grippy". I am also currently using my Goped ESR (electric) for commuting to work, this works much better as it has pneumatic tires which cruise through road imperfections.

            Here's my take on portability which I know is another important consideration:

            Xootr Street - My wife and I have each packed our Xootrs in checked luggage and have used them for various vacations in New York (I will definitely try to plan our next trip around a scoot with the group in Central Park - which we did scoot thru during our last trip there), California and New Orleans, they are also relatively light to transport around town - I have the shoulder straps as well.

            Razor A5 - I have used this on business trips, but I do not have a carrying strap for this.

            Goped Sport/Knowped - This is somewhat heavier - I believe the Xootr MG is 9.9lbs (my Street is 10.9lbs), the A5 is 13 lbs, the Knowped is 13lbs, which would make it a bit harder to get around on public transport/travels. The Xootr and A5 handle bars also retract, cutting about 3 inches off the overall length when folded.

            Over the weekend, my wife and I took a 8 mile (round trip) scoot on our Xootrs along the Chicago lakefront, no problems, and especially easy when we can simply stop, fold up the Xootrs and strap them around our shoulders for carrying. It is an elegant and simply setup which just works.

            Hope that helps.

            Leonard

            --- In NYCKickScooters@yahoogroups.com, "Filibogado" <fernando.tonolete@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Hi Valerie:
            >
            > Thanks for such a helpful post. It came just in the nick of time, as I
            > already had the Xootr MG in my shopping cart, but kept hesitating
            > because of one troubling review in Amazon, a portion of which I quote
            > below:
            >
            > "Unfortunately, (the Xooter) keeps trying to kill me.
            >
            > Every time I hit a discontinuity on the road surface of more than a
            > half-inch (a crack in the pavement, the edge of a metal plate placed on
            > the street for repairs) the Xootr tries to take me on a 360 degree
            > head-over-heels ride with the final destination, no doubt, being my head
            > splashed on the pavement like a watermelon. (So far I've managed to leap
            > off in time.)
            >
            > Every time I ride it now it's with intense fear and concentration,
            > scanning the road surface with life-and-death intensity, ready to leap
            > aside and tumble should I hit a bump."
            >
            > I am a mature baby boomer, and all I wanted to do was take out a scooter
            > during lunch break, leisurely and safely scoot in front of and around
            > the White House and down the Washington DC Mall area while dressed in my
            > federal worker attire (dress shoes, long-sleeve shirt and tie, leaving
            > the suit in the office). My sense of fashion says that the Xootr would
            > be a more elegant solution because I could slip it into its bag and
            > sneak out of the office without attracting attention, then unfold the
            > scooter incognito once I'm out there, then sneaking back into the
            > office. I've never seen a kick scooter in downtown DC, though there are
            > lots of rental bikes and Segways. I guess there's a guy in the Veterans
            > Admin agency who has one but I haven't seen him ride it.
            >
            > Given my probably irrational fear (as in "Help! I'm falling, I can't get
            > up!" ) of falling, the pendulum is swinging again from the elegance of
            > the Xootr design to the safety of the Goped which your post helped
            > solidify in my mind. As to portability, I plan to take the scooter about
            > once a week from home to the office and back, so as long as it fits in
            > the commuter bus on my lap or between my legs, the Goped might fit the
            > bill.
            >
            > Finally, I am such a slow and bad rider that I once took the Virginia
            > Motorcycle Safety course and I flunked because I could not negotiate a
            > curve at high speed without slowing down. So I guess a slow, lumbering
            > Goped would not be so bad after all.
            >
            > Thanks again, and I guess I'll wait till this pm in case others want to
            > weigh in on this issue - what will it be: the elegance and portability
            > of the Xootr or the comfort and safety of the Goped? Decisions,
            > decisions, decisions ...tsk, tsk, tsk.
            >
            > --- In NYCKickScooters@yahoogroups.com, Valerie Yaros <vyaros@>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > Hello Fernando -- and everyone -- this is the first time I have
            > replied to a
            > > post for the group, although I have been reading them for many months.
            > I
            > > bought my Know-Ped in August 2009 (without being able to test it out,
            > as no
            > > one carried them) and use it constantly -- although I had never been
            > on a
            > > scooter in my life before.
            >
          • roybassist
            ... A Xootr strap fits the A5 just fine, if you ever care to switch one from one of your Xootrs. ... The weight of the A5 is 8 lb, not 13. This has been
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 2, 2011
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In NYCKickScooters@yahoogroups.com, "L" <lho@...> wrote:
              > Razor A5 - I have used this on business trips, but I do not have a carrying strap for this.
              >

              A Xootr strap fits the A5 just fine, if you ever care to switch one from one of your Xootrs.

              > Goped Sport/Knowped - This is somewhat heavier - I believe the Xootr MG is 9.9lbs (my Street is 10.9lbs), the A5 is 13 lbs, the Knowped is 13lbs, which would make it a bit harder to get around on public transport/travels. The Xootr and A5 handle bars also retract, cutting about 3 inches off the overall length when folded.

              The weight of the A5 is 8 lb, not 13. This has been verified by Dorlene, me, and I think a few others in this group. The published specifications for the A5 are incorrect.
            • L
              Thanks, I have considered using the Xootr strap on the A5 - will try it out. I did think that the A5 weight posted on the Razor site seemed off. The shedding
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 2, 2011
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                Thanks, I have considered using the Xootr strap on the A5 - will try it out.

                I did think that the A5 weight posted on the Razor site seemed off.

                The shedding of a few pounds on these scooters does make a difference....I was carry about 15 additional pounds (in my bag) on our lakefront trip....

                Laurie - You will enjoy the A5, I strongly recommend closed-toed shoes for scooting!

                --- In NYCKickScooters@yahoogroups.com, "roybassist" <roybassist@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- In NYCKickScooters@yahoogroups.com, "L" <lho@> wrote:
                > > Razor A5 - I have used this on business trips, but I do not have a carrying strap for this.
                > >
                >
                > A Xootr strap fits the A5 just fine, if you ever care to switch one from one of your Xootrs.
                >
                > > Goped Sport/Knowped - This is somewhat heavier - I believe the Xootr MG is 9.9lbs (my Street is 10.9lbs), the A5 is 13 lbs, the Knowped is 13lbs, which would make it a bit harder to get around on public transport/travels. The Xootr and A5 handle bars also retract, cutting about 3 inches off the overall length when folded.
                >
                > The weight of the A5 is 8 lb, not 13. This has been verified by Dorlene, me, and I think a few others in this group. The published specifications for the A5 are incorrect.
                >
              • dorlene
                Thank you for posting this amazon.com review, Fernando. In Message #1355, which I posted on 11/15/10, I said: After several years of riding Xootrs and
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 2, 2011
                View Source
                • 0 Attachment
                  Thank you for posting this amazon.com review, Fernando. In Message
                  #1355, which I posted on 11/15/10, I said: "After several years of
                  riding Xootrs and frequent falls: wheel stopped dead when caught in a
                  sidewalk groove, hit a pebble or rut in the road, etc.; three times the
                  pin came apart and the Xootr collapsed; several times the handlebar fell
                  down because the bolt holding it loosened and I lost my balance." I
                  switched to the Razor A5 2 years ago and haven't had a mishap since.

                  I don't know what makes the A5's tires safer: the shape? the wider
                  width? the softness? a combination of all three?

                  The Xootr may be a more elegantly designed vehicle but in my experience
                  it's not as safe as the A5.

                  --- In NYCKickScooters@yahoogroups.com, "Filibogado"
                  <fernando.tonolete@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi Valerie:
                  >
                  > Thanks for such a helpful post. It came just in the nick of time, as I
                  > already had the Xootr MG in my shopping cart, but kept hesitating
                  > because of one troubling review in Amazon, a portion of which I quote
                  > below:
                  >
                  > "Unfortunately, (the Xooter) keeps trying to kill me.
                  >
                  > Every time I hit a discontinuity on the road surface of more than a
                  > half-inch (a crack in the pavement, the edge of a metal plate placed
                  on
                  > the street for repairs) the Xootr tries to take me on a 360 degree
                  > head-over-heels ride with the final destination, no doubt, being my
                  head
                  > splashed on the pavement like a watermelon. (So far I've managed to
                  leap
                  > off in time.)
                  >
                  > Every time I ride it now it's with intense fear and concentration,
                  > scanning the road surface with life-and-death intensity, ready to leap
                  > aside and tumble should I hit a bump."
                  >
                  > I am a mature baby boomer, and all I wanted to do was take out a
                  scooter
                  > during lunch break, leisurely and safely scoot in front of and around
                  > the White House and down the Washington DC Mall area while dressed in
                  my
                  > federal worker attire (dress shoes, long-sleeve shirt and tie, leaving
                  > the suit in the office). My sense of fashion says that the Xootr would
                  > be a more elegant solution because I could slip it into its bag and
                  > sneak out of the office without attracting attention, then unfold the
                  > scooter incognito once I'm out there, then sneaking back into the
                  > office. I've never seen a kick scooter in downtown DC, though there
                  are
                  > lots of rental bikes and Segways. I guess there's a guy in the
                  Veterans
                  > Admin agency who has one but I haven't seen him ride it.
                  >
                  > Given my probably irrational fear (as in "Help! I'm falling, I can't
                  get
                  > up!" ) of falling, the pendulum is swinging again from the elegance
                  of
                  > the Xootr design to the safety of the Goped which your post helped
                  > solidify in my mind. As to portability, I plan to take the scooter
                  about
                  > once a week from home to the office and back, so as long as it fits in
                  > the commuter bus on my lap or between my legs, the Goped might fit the
                  > bill.
                  >
                  > Finally, I am such a slow and bad rider that I once took the Virginia
                  > Motorcycle Safety course and I flunked because I could not negotiate a
                  > curve at high speed without slowing down. So I guess a slow, lumbering
                  > Goped would not be so bad after all.
                  >
                  > Thanks again, and I guess I'll wait till this pm in case others want
                  to
                  > weigh in on this issue - what will it be: the elegance and portability
                  > of the Xootr or the comfort and safety of the Goped? Decisions,
                  > decisions, decisions ...tsk, tsk, tsk.
                  >
                  > --- In NYCKickScooters@yahoogroups.com, Valerie Yaros vyaros@
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hello Fernando -- and everyone -- this is the first time I have
                  > replied to a
                  > > post for the group, although I have been reading them for many
                  months.
                  > I
                  > > bought my Know-Ped in August 2009 (without being able to test it
                  out,
                  > as no
                  > > one carried them) and use it constantly -- although I had never been
                  > on a
                  > > scooter in my life before.
                  >
                • Lisa Stein
                  I always worry about that, but it hasn t happened to me either on my Razor A5! On another note, does anyone get a sore hip when racing around a bit more than
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jun 2, 2011
                  View Source
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I always worry about that, but it hasn't happened to me either on my Razor A5!

                    On another note, does anyone get a sore hip when racing around a bit more than usual?
                    I'm not on my scooter a lot, but a week and a half about I was in a hurry, went a mile plus and then back, switch feet, but feel sore on the left side, climbing stairs...
                    I know, I'm getting old, but still...

                    Lisa

                    On Jun 2, 2011, at 9:04 PM, dorlene wrote:

                    Thank you for posting this amazon.com review, Fernando. In Message
                    #1355, which I posted on 11/15/10, I said: "After several years of
                    riding Xootrs and frequent falls: wheel stopped dead when caught in a
                    sidewalk groove, hit a pebble or rut in the road, etc.; three times the
                    pin came apart and the Xootr collapsed; several times the handlebar fell
                    down because the bolt holding it loosened and I lost my balance." I
                    switched to the Razor A5 2 years ago and haven't had a mishap since.

                    I don't know what makes the A5's tires safer: the shape? the wider
                    width? the softness? a combination of all three?

                    The Xootr may be a more elegantly designed vehicle but in my experience
                    it's not as safe as the A5.

                    --- In NYCKickScooters@yahoogroups.com, "Filibogado"
                    <fernando.tonolete@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Hi Valerie:
                    >
                    > Thanks for such a helpful post. It came just in the nick of time, as I
                    > already had the Xootr MG in my shopping cart, but kept hesitating
                    > because of one troubling review in Amazon, a portion of which I quote
                    > below:
                    >
                    > "Unfortunately, (the Xooter) keeps trying to kill me.
                    >
                    > Every time I hit a discontinuity on the road surface of more than a
                    > half-inch (a crack in the pavement, the edge of a metal plate placed
                    on
                    > the street for repairs) the Xootr tries to take me on a 360 degree
                    > head-over-heels ride with the final destination, no doubt, being my
                    head
                    > splashed on the pavement like a watermelon. (So far I've managed to
                    leap
                    > off in time.)
                    >
                    > Every time I ride it now it's with intense fear and concentration,
                    > scanning the road surface with life-and-death intensity, ready to leap
                    > aside and tumble should I hit a bump."
                    >
                    > I am a mature baby boomer, and all I wanted to do was take out a
                    scooter
                    > during lunch break, leisurely and safely scoot in front of and around
                    > the White House and down the Washington DC Mall area while dressed in
                    my
                    > federal worker attire (dress shoes, long-sleeve shirt and tie, leaving
                    > the suit in the office). My sense of fashion says that the Xootr would
                    > be a more elegant solution because I could slip it into its bag and
                    > sneak out of the office without attracting attention, then unfold the
                    > scooter incognito once I'm out there, then sneaking back into the
                    > office. I've never seen a kick scooter in downtown DC, though there
                    are
                    > lots of rental bikes and Segways. I guess there's a guy in the
                    Veterans
                    > Admin agency who has one but I haven't seen him ride it.
                    >
                    > Given my probably irrational fear (as in "Help! I'm falling, I can't
                    get
                    > up!" ) of falling, the pendulum is swinging again from the elegance
                    of
                    > the Xootr design to the safety of the Goped which your post helped
                    > solidify in my mind. As to portability, I plan to take the scooter
                    about
                    > once a week from home to the office and back, so as long as it fits in
                    > the commuter bus on my lap or between my legs, the Goped might fit the
                    > bill.
                    >
                    > Finally, I am such a slow and bad rider that I once took the Virginia
                    > Motorcycle Safety course and I flunked because I could not negotiate a
                    > curve at high speed without slowing down. So I guess a slow, lumbering
                    > Goped would not be so bad after all.
                    >
                    > Thanks again, and I guess I'll wait till this pm in case others want
                    to
                    > weigh in on this issue - what will it be: the elegance and portability
                    > of the Xootr or the comfort and safety of the Goped? Decisions,
                    > decisions, decisions ...tsk, tsk, tsk.
                    >
                    > --- In NYCKickScooters@yahoogroups.com, Valerie Yaros vyaros@
                    > wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hello Fernando -- and everyone -- this is the first time I have
                    > replied to a
                    > > post for the group, although I have been reading them for many
                    months.
                    > I
                    > > bought my Know-Ped in August 2009 (without being able to test it
                    out,
                    > as no
                    > > one carried them) and use it constantly -- although I had never been
                    > on a
                    > > scooter in my life before.
                    >


                    ~~~~~~~~
                    Lisa Stein
                    718.349.7191







                  • Laurie
                    Most of my shoes are actually open-heeled (i.e., slip-ons), but I do realize that I need both my toes AND heels secured safely inside any scooter shoes!
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jun 2, 2011
                    View Source
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Most of my shoes are actually "open-heeled" (i.e., slip-ons), but I do realize that I need both my toes AND heels secured safely inside any scooter shoes!

                      Yesterday, I got the idea of looking at those shoes that are a cross between sneakers and river rafting shoes -- they kind of look like the skeleton of a sneaker. They should keep my hot feet cool plus be fairly "grippy" for those slippery river rocks. (Makes me miss whitewater rivers and my old days of rafting and kayaking...)

                      -laurie

                      --- In NYCKickScooters@yahoogroups.com, "L" <lho@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > <snip>
                      >
                      > Laurie - You will enjoy the A5, I strongly recommend closed-toed shoes for scooting!
                      >
                    • Lisa Stein
                      Those sound good. I try to wear something with a good solid sole on it. Good for kicking and supporting foot on scooter or kicking. I often end up in sneakers,
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jun 2, 2011
                      View Source
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Those sound good. I try to wear something with a good solid sole on it. Good for kicking and supporting foot on scooter or kicking.
                        I often end up in sneakers, usually wear slip ons for running around, but not for scooting. I have some of those grippy water shoes, Keens. Will try them for summer.

                        Scooting takes a lot more muscle power than you think. Especially on little hills. You don't even realize where the slants are til you scoot, then you KNOW where the slight inclines are!
                        It's fun tho! And definitely faster. I got my A5 from Amazon too. Very happy with it.

                        lisa

                        On Jun 2, 2011, at 9:46 PM, Laurie wrote:

                        Most of my shoes are actually "open-heeled" (i.e., slip-ons), but I do realize that I need both my toes AND heels secured safely inside any scooter shoes!

                        Yesterday, I got the idea of looking at those shoes that are a cross between sneakers and river rafting shoes -- they kind of look like the skeleton of a sneaker. They should keep my hot feet cool plus be fairly "grippy" for those slippery river rocks. (Makes me miss whitewater rivers and my old days of rafting and kayaking...)

                        -laurie

                        --- In NYCKickScooters@yahoogroups.com, "L" <lho@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > <snip>
                        > 
                        > Laurie - You will enjoy the A5, I strongly recommend closed-toed shoes for scooting!
                        > 


                        ~~~~~~~~
                        Lisa Stein
                        718.349.7191







                      • Liam Morland
                        ... Hash: SHA1 ... Very interesting. There is lots of science at work in scooters! The full message has some other interesting comparisons:
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jun 6, 2011
                        View Source
                        • 0 Attachment
                          -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
                          Hash: SHA1

                          2011-05-31 22:25-0400 roybassist <roybassist@...> wrote:
                          >It may not be as comprehensive or as rigorous as you might like, but
                          >John (aka maskedmarvelswat) owns an instrument for measuring hardness,
                          >called a durometer, and he has used it to measure the hardness of the
                          >wheels of a number of different scooters. Below are some of what I
                          >consider to be his most important findings. This is excerpted from
                          >Message #1038 on the group web site: [...]

                          Very interesting. There is lots of science at work in scooters!

                          The full message has some other interesting comparisons:

                          http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/NYCKickScooters/message/1038

                          Liam

                          - --
                          Liam Morland <Liam@...> Canadian Scout Camps Directory
                          http://Liam.Morland.ca/ http://ScoutDocs.ca/Camps/

                          PGP Public Key: http://liam.morland.ca/pgp-public-key.asc

                          -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
                          Version: GnuPG v1.4.11 (GNU/Linux)

                          iEYEARECAAYFAk3tAUoACgkQgtUMElSxnjepuQCdFzBYIQ+qhYrY3y8QRm/zcIDK
                          ZMIAoMa6M8RLdVV4QoLE5aCwX55/+J/w
                          =WBFD
                          -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
                        • Laurie
                          Lisa, Luckily, my route is mostly fairly flat -- with some sections that are so steep that there s NO WAY I m scooting up or down. I ll see in the morning how
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jun 9, 2011
                          View Source
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Lisa,

                            Luckily, my route is mostly fairly flat -- with some sections that are so steep that there's NO WAY I'm scooting up or down. I'll see in the morning how sore my muscles are from my first day commuting to/from work.

                            (If you didn't read my earlier post...) I did notice some of those very slight inclines/declines. It turns out the my first 1/2 mile of my commute to work (well, after getting down LOTS of stairs) is a very slight decline -- so I get to just coast for a while.

                            -laurie
                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.