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Re: Roof Walk boards

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  • derrell
    I would think that the later cars would be more likely not to have painted roof walks - if they were ever painted. You had ICC rules, ARA rules, ARR rules etc.
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 19, 2012
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      I would think that the later cars would be more likely not to have painted roof walks - if they were ever painted. You had ICC rules, ARA rules, ARR rules etc. etc. etc. becoming more and more safety conscious. By the 1920s the rules were pretty well defined against painting wooden roof walks. Eventually, of course, wooden roof walks were prohibited on new builds (and in fact roof walks were done away with altogether as we all know). Perhaps if you are modeling the TOC painting the walks would be prototypical but generally, the modern era, no...

      Derrell
    • Mike S
      You had ICC rules, ARA rules, ARR rules etc. Sweet, that is good enought for me not to paint them. Mike Swederska
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 20, 2012
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        "You had ICC rules, ARA rules, ARR rules etc."
        Sweet, that is good enought for me not to paint them.
        Mike Swederska
      • Keith
        Mike, it is a hobby, and you are welcome to do as you wish. I consulted Dorman s two Rocky Mountain Railroad books. The first (skinny) one has some photos of
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 21, 2012
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          Mike, it is a hobby, and you are welcome to do as you wish.

          I consulted Dorman's two 'Rocky Mountain Railroad' books. The first (skinny) one has some photos of a train from the caboose in color (by Bob Lunoe, I think). Being the RGS, and in the 50s, these cars have seen better days, but I believe the roof walks indicate signs of having been painted. Of great note is the abundance of cinders clinging to the ridges of the Murphy Roof panels.

          The second book has the great OT Davis photo of the 3000-series boxcars being rebuilt in Alamosa, and is taken from the top of a car. The roofwalks on the near car have grain clearly visible leading me to question if they were painted, or just soaked up the paint, or were extra shiny in the sunlight.

          I also looked in the 'High Line' book on the C&S and found a couple images of C&S boxcars that are also inconclusive, though one looks like the roofwalk has signs of paint. Otto Perry may have some good images of boxes in Clear Creek service; looks like John Maxwell may have snapped some good color images too.

          This is a tough issues, as railfans were not apt to get up high to shoot photos of cars, or were far away if they did. It can be tough to discern on B&W photos, and color photos date to after WWII when maintenance was diminished: anything after 1968 is questionable.

          In the spirit of fairness, I am apt to mark this issue 'plausible,' and I believe they were painted or not, depending upon corporate policy, time and or material. This is the most exposed part of the car, and while easier to repair than an end beam or drawbar sill, they still take time. Paint can be slippery, but you could easily mix in some aluminum oxide or even sand to give the walk some bite.

          Check out these sources, and they will give you some excellent tips on how to weather car roofs and roof walks!

          Keith Hayes
        • James S. Brown
          Hi all... First off, a Merry Christmas to each and every one of you, along with all those that you hold dear. But to get back on topic, I wonder whether even
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 21, 2012
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            Hi all...

            First off, a Merry Christmas to each and every one of you, along with all
            those that you hold dear.

            But to get back on topic, I wonder whether even if the roof walks *were*
            painted, would they perhaps not be subject to increased wear with not only
            the elements but the foot traffic? So it would appear on this basis that the
            painted surface might deteriorate more readily so my opinion is that
            anything between scuffed paint and no paint at all would be plausible.

            jim
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