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Re: Grab Iron jig

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  • Mike S
    I transferred the measurements from the car blue print. The holes are centered on the brass so that I can use the drilling jig on the end or side of the car.
    Message 1 of 14 , Nov 26, 2012
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      I transferred the measurements from the car blue print. The holes are centered on the brass so that I can use the drilling jig on the end or side of the car. There is a top and bottom because of the grab irons not being centered top to bottom. Now the jig is only for the grab irons that run up to the fascia and not the single grab iron on the other end. Since I am building box cars from scribe wood the drilling jig worked great. Now the one drawback is that I could not see through the brass to make sure the grab iron holes fell on a board and not a grove. I created the jig with the same six inches on both sides of the holes to be lined up with the car end corner. Because of using the same jig for ends and sides you cannot put an edge or lip on the jig to line up with the end of the car. If you do it will not interchange with the other angle. I used the length of the jig to fit perfectly from the fascia down to the bottom edge of the car. Because of the variable of the wooden scribe siding meeting at the corners. I found myself moving the jig to make sure I was drilling on boards and not groves. I plan to make the next drilling jig from clear plastic. That way I can see the scribed lines and boards when lining up the jig for drilling.
      I drilled all four sides in less than five minutes. Pressed in the preformed grabs in another five minutes hassle free.
      Mike Swederska
    • derrell
      Good information, Mike. It is interesting and educational to find what other modelers do. Of course I work from blueprints - erection drawings - too. But I
      Message 2 of 14 , Nov 28, 2012
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        Good information, Mike. It is interesting and educational to find what other modelers do. Of course I work from blueprints - erection drawings - too. But I don't use scribed wood so much primarily because of its inaccuracy in this smaller scale. It worked well for me in On3 when I built cars in the late '80s and I do enjoy wood more than plastic but in 3/16 scale it seems plastic provides more realistic results.
        I want to point out that when I make a Grab Iron jig it is primarily for a specific location and more or less for a specific type or series of cars. There is a bend in the jig to rest on the corner and it is made to fit between the bottom edges and fascia before I even scribe the hole marks with a digital caliper. This provides a fair amount of consistency - can there be error? Of course. But I think the difference is that of the material used to construct the car. Furthermore most of the cars are from kits that I am modifying (backdating). Being a manufactured product there is an even greater degree of accuracy than cutting my own sides. Unfortunately I must often mitigate pre-marked holes as well as molded on G.I. bolt heads.
        So I find a lip to be quite useful. However it would be nice to have clear material to devise my jig.
        To the problem of drilling on a siding seam, in the early days the G.I.s were often held onto the car body with large screws. However car builders still tried to have something more substantial behind the siding so that the screws bit into more than < an inch of wood. In 1911 Congress outlawed the use of screws and required bolts to hold the G.I.s in place. Having a brace behind the G.I. became even more desirable and the question of a siding seem even less of an issue since holes for the bolts were drilled rather than self tapped (as it were). In looking at blueprints it isn't that unusual that a G.I. might lap over a seam in the siding.

        Derrell
      • Mike S
        Derrel, Thanks for the info on the history of grab irons. That was really cool stuff. Your right about the jig for just a certain type of car. But as time goes
        Message 3 of 14 , Nov 28, 2012
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          Derrel,
          Thanks for the info on the history of grab irons. That was really cool stuff. Your right about the jig for just a certain type of car. But as time goes on once I have it made I can use it that same type of car and it's location.

          I know what your are saying about plastic vs wood. PBL kits are wonderful. I also have build cars from scratch with some styren but I just like working in wood on wood cars. That is one of the reasons I model NG
          Mike S

          --- In NWNG-Sn3Group@yahoogroups.com, "derrell" <onagerla@...> wrote:
          >
          > Good information, Mike. It is interesting and educational to find what other modelers do. Of course I work from blueprints - erection drawings - too. But I don't use scribed wood so much primarily because of its inaccuracy in this smaller scale. It worked well for me in On3 when I built cars in the late '80s and I do enjoy wood more than plastic but in 3/16 scale it seems plastic provides more realistic results.
          > I want to point out that when I make a Grab Iron jig it is primarily for a specific location and more or less for a specific type or series of cars. There is a bend in the jig to rest on the corner and it is made to fit between the bottom edges and fascia before I even scribe the hole marks with a digital caliper. This provides a fair amount of consistency - can there be error? Of course. But I think the difference is that of the material used to construct the car. Furthermore most of the cars are from kits that I am modifying (backdating). Being a manufactured product there is an even greater degree of accuracy than cutting my own sides. Unfortunately I must often mitigate pre-marked holes as well as molded on G.I. bolt heads.
          > So I find a lip to be quite useful. However it would be nice to have clear material to devise my jig.
          > To the problem of drilling on a siding seam, in the early days the G.I.s were often held onto the car body with large screws. However car builders still tried to have something more substantial behind the siding so that the screws bit into more than < an inch of wood. In 1911 Congress outlawed the use of screws and required bolts to hold the G.I.s in place. Having a brace behind the G.I. became even more desirable and the question of a siding seem even less of an issue since holes for the bolts were drilled rather than self tapped (as it were). In looking at blueprints it isn't that unusual that a G.I. might lap over a seam in the siding.
          >
          > Derrell
          >
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