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Roofs, rooves, ruffs. . . .

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  • Bill Adkins
    I have heard it pronounced all different ways but it is about time to put one on the Troublesome Creek Mill. . .a roof I mean. Thus, I would be interested in
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 30, 2000
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      I have heard it pronounced all different ways but it is about time to
      put one on the Troublesome Creek Mill. . .a roof I mean.

      Thus, I would be interested in the members thoughts on prototype
      materials (shingles, corrugated metal, etc.), modeling techniques and
      weathering for such a large structure.

      BTW: The last question I posed the group on striping paint from brass
      locomotives worked like a charm! An ultra sonic clearner, a glass
      container containing acetone immeresed in the water bath, and a very
      little work with an acid brush, plenty of ventilation and all worked
      out perfectly. Thanks, guys!

      Bill
    • Brian Pate
      Hi Bill ... From: Bill Adkins To: Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2000 5:29 PM Subject:
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 1, 2000
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        Hi Bill

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Bill Adkins" <w.s.adkins@...>
        To: <NWNG-Sn3Group@egroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2000 5:29 PM
        Subject: [NWNG-Sn3Group] Roofs, rooves, ruffs. . . .


        > I have heard it pronounced all different ways but it is about time to
        > put one on the Troublesome Creek Mill. . .a roof I mean.
        >
        > Thus, I would be interested in the members thoughts on prototype
        > materials (shingles, corrugated metal, etc.), modeling techniques and
        > weathering for such a large structure.

        In the Yukon, although our gold is placer and we don't need mills, all
        similar roofs (!) would be corrugated iron. The commercial products are
        generally too rigid, and the corrugations get squashed when you try to cut
        them to size. The late Frank McKinney built a machine, based on a washing
        machine ringer, in which aluminum foil precut to size is passed between two
        meshed worms (gears) of opposite sense and of the right pitch. If you want a
        lot of corrugated iron, the production is a bit tedious, but the result is
        near enough to scale to be believable. And the price is right. I did the KMR
        engine house and depot that way, applying the foil with contact cement or
        ACC. Frank used the kind of aluminum sheet that was used in office copying
        machines of that era, but I find that freezer foil works.

        As for finishing, I use a general airbrushing of Floquil reefer gray to get
        a galvanised look, followed by artist oil raw sienna for rust streaks,
        followed by a light overspray of Floquil grime. I imagine there are similar
        colours in the new-fangled latex.

        Regards
        Brian Pate
        bpate@...
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