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Gone digital

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  • cilou.zelkine
    ... Larry It is better to have the original slide or color negative scanned rather than a print. This way, you can rework (and enhance) your old shots with
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 29, 2006
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      >you wrote of the atmosphere you got with the Mamiya camera.
      >Would some of that be preserved by scanning film prints with
      >a high quality scanner?

      Larry

      It is better to have the original slide or color negative scanned
      rather than a print. This way, you can "rework" (and enhance)
      your old shots with Photoshop if necessary.
      However, having 2"1/4 x 2"1/4 transparencies CORRECTLY
      scanned in a professional photo lab is darn expensive!...

      > Larry, who has a couple of good SLR cameras that haven't
      > seen light since I got a digital camera.

      Same thing with me: I haven't used my SLR Nikon's nor my
      M4 Leica's since last summer, when I bought my little Canon
      PowerShot A95. With it I can unreluctantly make a hundred
      shots in a single small occasion, then discard without any
      regret (and at no cost!) all those I don't like.
      A month and a half ago, I went especially to Paris to buy a
      few badly needed one-gallon doses of D76 developer.
      I haven't even opened one yet....
      Oh boy, do I feel ashamed!.....

      Alex
    • Rick Neet
      Gang, There is one thing that truly separates film from digital photography and that s life expectancy of the storage media. I know that are more knowledgeable
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 29, 2006
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        Gang,

        There is one thing that truly separates film from digital photography and
        that's life expectancy of the storage media. I know that are more
        knowledgeable "pro" photographers out there than myself but I think
        they'll agree the survivability of digital images is still a big question.
        While
        digital photography brings us many nice features that we all enjoy, will
        that family photo of your child's first day of school be around when he
        graduates college??? Or of that first scratch built locomotive(for R.R.
        content)? There's a good chance the hard drive it was stored on has
        long since crashed, the CD decayed, and the flash drive "dimmed".

        I don't have a good answer to this issue. I love my Olympus D-cam and
        what I can do with photos, but it sure worries me what I'll have left to
        look at in 20 years. Take a look at your color polaroid shots from the
        60's and 70's. Can you still see everything in the print?

        Rick "still in the 'dark' room" Neet
        Crystal Pass & Pacific RR

        PS. Kodachrome 25 has been discontinued by Kodak FWIW!

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "cilou.zelkine" <cilou.zelkine@...>
        To: <NWNG-Sn3Group@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, January 29, 2006 10:09 AM
        Subject: [NWNG-Sn3Group] Gone digital


        >
        > It is better to have the original slide or color negative scanned
        > rather than a print. This way, you can "rework" (and enhance)
        > your old shots with Photoshop if necessary.
        > However, having 2"1/4 x 2"1/4 transparencies CORRECTLY
        > scanned in a professional photo lab is darn expensive!...
        >
        >> Larry, who has a couple of good SLR cameras that haven't
        >> seen light since I got a digital camera.
        >
        > Same thing with me: I haven't used my SLR Nikon's nor my
        > M4 Leica's since last summer, when I bought my little Canon
        > PowerShot A95. With it I can unreluctantly make a hundred
        > shots in a single small occasion, then discard without any
        > regret (and at no cost!) all those I don't like.
        > A month and a half ago, I went especially to Paris to buy a
        > few badly needed one-gallon doses of D76 developer.
        > I haven't even opened one yet....
        > Oh boy, do I feel ashamed!.....
        >
        > Alex
      • Paul Vaughn
        Rick: Like any saved info, photos can be backed up on a CD disk for safe keeping. You don t have to worry about a hard drive crashing. Every few years check
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 29, 2006
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          Rick: Like any saved info, photos can be backed up on a CD disk for safe keeping. You don't have to worry about a hard drive crashing. Every few years check the CD and make a new one with any new photos.

          I have found that scenery photos like Van Pelt's can not be taken with a 35mm camera. You need a large format camera or a 8/9mp digital camera. My camera shop can make a mural from a digital camera image.

          Therefore I bought a digital camer

          Paul
          Rick Neet <siderod@...> wrote:
          Gang,

          There is still a big question.
          There's a good chance the hard drive it was stored on has long since crashed, the CD decayed, and the flash drive "dimmed".
          I can do with photos, but it sure worries me what I'll have left to look at in 20 years. Take a look at your color polaroid shots from the 60's and 70's. Can you still see everything in the print?

          Rick "still in the 'dark' room" Neet
          Crystal Pass & Pacific RR

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "cilou.zelkine" <cilou.zelkine@...>
          Subject: [NWNG-Sn3Group] Gone digital

          I bought my little Canon
          PowerShot A95. With it I can unreluctantly make a hundred shots in a single small occasion, then discard without any regret (and at no cost!) all those I don't like.

          Alex




          ---------------------------------
          Do you Yahoo!?
          With a free 1 GB, there's more in store with Yahoo! Mail.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • David Keith
          ... Will that old shoe box or photo album be there when you want it? Will the Grandkids have spilled their soda on them? Digital and Film both require storage
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 29, 2006
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            > From: "Rick Neet" <siderod@...>
            > Subject: Re: Gone digital
            >
            > Gang,
            >
            > There is one thing that truly separates film from digital photography and
            > that's life expectancy of the storage media. I know that are more
            > knowledgeable "pro" photographers out there than myself but I think
            > they'll agree the survivability of digital images is still a big question.
            > While
            > digital photography brings us many nice features that we all enjoy, will
            > that family photo of your child's first day of school be around when he
            > graduates college??? Or of that first scratch built locomotive(for R.R.
            > content)? There's a good chance the hard drive it was stored on has
            > long since crashed, the CD decayed, and the flash drive "dimmed".

            Will that old shoe box or photo album be there when you want it?
            Will the Grandkids have spilled their soda on them?

            Digital and Film both require storage processes, you just need a plan....
            Here is my basic process and backup means...

            a) I use an extra external drive to backup all important documents on
            my computer.
            b) I use nightly backups. Some use the XP backups, I use a free-ware
            program called SyncBack. I backup my photos before deleting them
            from the flash card (thus my photos are always backed up).
            c) I sort and tag/categorize my photos using PhotoShop Album
            There are other options, Thumbs Plus comes to mind. Using
            such a tool enables me to find my digital images rapidly, I can
            find all photos containing my son and my mother in 30 seconds
            Try that with a Film storage system. I can also scroll through
            all images sequentially to when they were taken (by the date
            stored within the image).
            d) Periodically, I back up my image directories to CD-ROM.
            I take the CD's off site (how do you do that with film?)
            e) Photos I like a lot (or want to share...) I have printed on a photo
            printer. I do not own a photo printer (I do not want to maintain),
            I upload them to a photo service on the web. Personally, I use
            Wal-Mart and the 1-hour in-store processing. In store Wal-Mart has
            High quality Fuji printer, their regional processing locations do
            not use the same quality printers (I do not like my local Wal-Mart,
            I hate waiting in line, service is not good, but for the photos, they
            are paid over the internet, so I walk back to the photo center,
            collect my images and walk out). I've not yet attempted an 8x10
            for a photo contest...I do use my personal printer for printing
            images which are "modeling inspiration" or similar. I take the prints
            to the workbench.

            Dave K.

            ...Happy with digital imaging...
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